ADB to fund air pollution study in Cebu industrial town with $1-million grant

THE ASIAN DEVELOPMENT Bank (ADB) said it approved a $1-million technical assistance (TA) grant to reduce air pollution in Naga City, Cebu. ADB project documents available online show that it approved on Monday the grant for Air Quality Management in connection with the Visayas Base-Load Power Development Project. “This TA aims to improve air quality […] The post ADB to fund air pollution study in Cebu industrial town with $1-million grant appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource: bworldonline bworldonlineMar 13th, 2018

The Mindanao Trust Fund: Supporting Reconstruction and Development in Conflict-affected areas in Mindanao

MAGUINDANAO – Conflict-affected communities in Mindanao are among the poorest in the Philippines suffering from poor infrastructure and lack of basic services, including education and health, weak local governance, and minimal private sector investment, according to a report by the World Bank. It said insecurity has been a major challenge. Frequent armed clashes driven by multiple and inter-related forms of conflict—insurgent groups, clan disputes, and quasi-ideological criminal banditry—have created severe economic dislocation and displacement of people. Armed conflict and poverty are inextricably linked. The Autonomous Region in Muslim Mindanao (ARMM), one of the most heavily conflict-affected regions, has poverty incidence of 52.9 percent, almost double the national average. Based on the peace deal with the Philippine government in 2012, the Moro Islamic Liberation Front (MILF) is expected to transition into a social and political movement. One of the key challenges for a successful transition is to help the MILF build development planning, budgeting, and public administration skills within its ranks. The Mindanao Trust Fund or MTF works to enhance access to services and economic opportunities and build social cohesion while enhancing the capacity of local institutions in conflict-affected areas. It supports the Bangsamoro Development Agency (BDA), the development arm of the MILF. Based on a 2001 agreement between the Government of the Philippines and the MILF, the BDA is tasked to determine, lead, and manage relief, rehabilitation, and development projects in the conflict-affected areas. It’s a unique project that enables various stakeholders—government, the World Bank, and other development partners—to work with a revolutionary movement in delivering development results even before the signing of a final peace agreement. With an enhanced role of women, the program helps the BDA to deliver community development and income-generating subprojects in communities. This enhances access to basic services such as clean water, roads and day care centers. BDA also works to strengthen community enterprises for employment and income generation. The community-based approach brings people from different groups—Muslims, Christians, and Indigenous Peoples—together for the common good, building social cohesion and trust. Over time the program has expanded beyond community development to assist the BDA to develop skills in macro-development planning. A broad package of engagement complements the MTF promoting inclusive growth across Mindanao. For example, US$121 million for farm-to-market roads in Mindanao is included in the nation-wide PRDP while the National Community Driven Development Project is financing US$190 million for CDD activities in Mindanao. Over a decade, 650,000 people (52% of whom are women) in 284 villages have benefitted from 641 subprojects financed by the MTF. The subprojects have included water systems, community centers, sanitation facilities, access roads, post-harvest facilities, and farming and fishing equipment. Eighty-six percent of the beneficiaries say that the project reflected their needs. The subprojects have reduced travel time to market, increased agricultural productivity, reduced post-harvest costs, and increased access to basic services such as clean water. Beneficiaries of income-generating subprojects reported a 10 to 20 percent increase in incomes. About 330,383 women beneficiaries learned skills in community planning and implementation. And 42 community enterprises in 11 villages have been trained in business development to generate sustainable employment and income. The Bangsamoro Development Agency has evolved from a small group of volunteers with no development experience to a leading development agency in Mindanao with 300 staff across seven regional management offices. BDA cooperates with multiple national and international partners, including JICA, WFP, and UNICEF. Bangsamoro Development Plan: the MTF provided technical assistance to help the BDA formulate the first comprehensive economic development blueprint prepared by a non-state armed group. Under the Alternative Learning System project, about 1,832 former combatants, housewives and out-of-school youth reported increased confidence because of improved reading, writing and numeracy abilities. These contributed to their more active participation in community meetings, stronger support for their children’s schoolwork, and better fair farm pricing transactions in city markets. The MTF has remained an important mechanism for consolidating peace and development in Mindanao. Beyond the impact of subprojects at the community level, the program’s ability to converge government and international support to empower Bangsamoro people and institutions to lead in community development seeks to lay the foundation for future sustainable and inclusive development in the Bangsamoro. The program fostered social cohesion by creating spaces for dialogue between Muslims, Christians, and Indigenous Peoples, as well as a diverse mix of local, regional, and national institutional actors. In many remote locations, the project provided the only opportunity for different groups to interact. The increased familiarity built mutual understanding—the basis of trust. Project policies also ensured active and meaningful participation of indigenous peoples and women, who are often otherwise marginalized from decision-making processes at the village level. The participative approach fostered social unity and built trust among stakeholders. In tri-people communities, minority groups shared better understanding and more harmonious relations with Muslims due to the consensus-building nature of CDD/CDR. While residents of remote communities—who had had little to no government access—disclosed growing trust towards government institutions at the end of the project due to the assistance provided by officials. The Bank’s technical and analytical support through the MTF and other engagements supporting peace and development in Mindanao have produced a significant body of literature that helps inform policy dialogues among various stakeholders. For instance, the Land Conflict study prepared for the Transitional Justice and Reconciliation Commission provides short- and medium-term recommendations that can help address land conflict in Mindanao. Also, the Public Expenditure Review in […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJan 26th, 2018

Great Barrier Reef funding boost to tackle predatory starfish

A multimillion-dollar campaign to stop the predatory crown-of-thorns starfish devouring the Great Barrier Reef was announced by the Australian government Monday in a push to preserve the World Heritage-listed ecosystem. The coral-eating starfish are naturally occurring but have proliferated due to pollution and agricultural run-off at the struggling reef. Their impact has been profound: a major study of the 2,300-kilometer (1,400-mile) long reef's health in 2012 showed coral cover has halved over the past 27 years, with 42 percent of the damage attributed to the pest. Prime Minister Malcolm Turnbull said Aus$60 million ($48 million) would go into the new drive, with just ove...Keep on reading: Great Barrier Reef funding boost to tackle predatory starfish.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJan 22nd, 2018

Heavy air pollution shuts down schools in Iran

  TEHRAN, Iran – Iran shut schools around Tehran Sunday, December 17, and cancelled sporting events as thick smog blanketed the capital despite curbs on road traffic and industrial activity. The authorities shuttered primary schools in the province of Tehran, home to 14 million residents, before ordering them to remain closed ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 18th, 2017

As Olympics near, South Korea agonizes over post-Games costs

By Kim Tong-Hyung, Associated Press GANGNEUNG, South Korea (AP) — South Korean officials have ruled out turning a state-of-the-art Olympic skating arena into a giant seafood freezer. Other than that, not much is certain about the country's post-Winter Games plans for a host of expensive venues. As officials prepare for the games in and around the small mountain town of Pyeongchang, there are lingering worries over the huge financial burden facing one of the nation's poorest regions. Local officials hope that the Games will provide a badly needed economic boost by marking the area as a world-class tourist destination. But past experience shows that hosts who justified their Olympics with expectations of financial windfalls were often left deeply disappointed when the fanfare ended. This isn't lost on Gangwon province, which governs Pyeongchang and nearby Gangneung, a seaside city that will host Olympic skating and hockey events. Officials there are trying hard to persuade the national government to pay to maintain new stadiums that will have little use once the athletes leave. Seoul, however, is so far balking at the idea. The Olympics, which begin Feb. 9, will cost South Korea about 14 trillion won ($12.9 billion), much more than the 8 to 9 trillion won ($7 to 8 billion) the country projected as the overall cost when Pyeongchang won the bid in 2011. Worries over costs have cast a shadow over the games among residents long frustrated with what they say were decades of neglect in a region that doesn't have much going on other than domestic tourism and fisheries. "What good will a nicely managed global event really do for residents when we are struggling so much to make ends meet?" said Lee Do-sung, a Gangneung restaurant owner. "What will the games even leave? Maybe only debt." ___ TEARING THINGS DOWN The atmosphere was starkly different three decades ago when grand preparations for the 1988 Seoul Summer Games essentially shaped the capital into the modern metropolis it is today. A massive sports complex and huge public parks emerged alongside the city's Han River. Next came new highways, bridges and subway lines. Forests of high-rise buildings rose above the bulldozed ruins of old commercial districts and slums. The legacy of the country's second Olympics will be less clear. In a country that cares much less now about the recognition that large sporting events bring, it will potentially be remembered more for things dismantled than built. Pyeongchang's picturesque Olympic Stadium — a pentagonal 35,000-seat arena that sits in a county of 40,000 people — will only be used for the opening and closing ceremonies of the Olympics and Paralympics before workers tear it down. A scenic downhill course in nearby Jeongseon will also be demolished after the games to restore the area to its natural state. Fierce criticism by environmentalists over the venue being built on a pristine forest sacred to locals caused construction delays that nearly forced pre-Olympic test events to be postponed. Gangwon officials want the national government to share costs for rebuilding the forest, which could be as much as 102 billion won ($95 million). ___ NO FISH Despite more than a decade of planning, Gangwon remains unsure what to do with the Olympic facilities it will keep. Winter sports facilities are often harder to maintain than summer ones because of the higher costs for maintaining ice and snow and the usually smaller number of people they attract. That's especially true in South Korea, which doesn't have a strong winter sports culture. Not all ideas are welcome. Gangwon officials say they never seriously considered a proposal to convert the 8,000-seat Gangneung Oval, the Olympic speed skating venue, into a refrigerated warehouse for seafood. Officials were unwilling to have frozen fish as part of their Olympic legacy. Gangwon officials also dismissed a theme park developer's suggestion to make the stadium a gambling venue where people place bets on skating races, citing the country's strict laws and largely negative view of gambling. A plan to have the 10,000-capacity Gangneung Hockey Center host a corporate league hockey team fell apart. Even worse off are Pyeongchang's bobsleigh track, ski jump hill and the biathlon and cross-country skiing venues, which were built for sports South Koreans are largely uninterested in. After its final inspection visit in August, the International Olympic Committee warned Pyeongchang's organizers that they risked creating white elephants from Olympic venues, though it didn't offer specific suggestions for what to do differently. Cautionary tales come from Athens, which was left with a slew of abandoned stadiums after the 2004 Summer Games that some say contributed to Greece's financial meltdown and Nagano, the Japanese town that never got the tourism bump it expected after spending an estimated $10.5 billion for the 1998 Winter Games. Some Olympic venues have proved to be too costly to maintain. The $100 million luge and bobsled track built in Turin for the 2006 games was later dismantled because of high operating costs. Pyeongchang will be only the second Olympic host to dismantle its ceremonial Olympic Stadium immediately after the games — the 1992 Winter Olympics host Albertville did so as well. ___ 'MONEY-DRINKING HIPPOS' Gangwon has demanded that the national government in Seoul pay for maintaining at least four Olympic facilities after the Games — the speed skating arena, hockey center, bobsleigh track and ski jump hill. This would save the province about 6 billion won ($5.5 million) a year, according to Park Cheol-sin, a Gangwon official. But the national government says doing so would be unfair to other South Korean cities that struggled financially after hosting large sports events. Incheon, the indebted 2014 Asian Games host, has a slew of unused stadiums now mocked as "money-drinking hippos." It would also be a hard sell to taxpayers outside of Gangwon, said Lee Jae-soon, an official from the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism. Unlike the 1988 Olympics and the 2002 World Cup, which were brought to South Korea after bids driven by the national government, the provincial government led the bid for the Pyeongchang games and it did so without any commitment from Seoul over footing the bill. Under current plans, Gangwon will be managing at least six Olympic facilities after the games. These facilities will create a 9.2 billion won ($8.5 million) deficit for the province every year, a sizable burden for a quickly-aging region that had the lowest income level among South Korean provinces in 2013, according to the Korea Industrial Strategy Institute, which was commissioned by Gangwon to analyze costs. Hong Jin-won, a Gangneung resident and activist who has been monitoring Olympic preparations for years, said the real deficit could be even bigger. The institute's calculation is based on assumptions that each facility would generate at least moderate levels of income, which Hong says is no sure thing. He said that could mean welfare spending gets slashed to help make up the lack of money. South Korea, a rapidly-aging country with a worsening job market and widening rich-poor gap, has by far the highest elderly poverty rate among rich nations, according to Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development figures. If Seoul doesn't pay for the Olympic facilities, and Gangwon can't turn them into cultural or leisure facilities, it might make more sense for Gangwon to just tear them down. Park said the national government must step up because the "Olympics are a national event, not a Gangwon event.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 15th, 2017

Best performing LGUs in WV receive P470-M in projects

THE Department of the Interior and Local Government (DILG-6) has released P470 million worth of projects to best performing local government units in Western Visayas since 2010. The Performance Challenge Fund (PCF) is a financial grant awarded to LGUs that passed the Seal of Good Local Governance (SGLG). DILG-6 Regional Director Anthony Nuyda said the […] The post Best performing LGUs in WV receive P470-M in projects appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsNov 7th, 2017

Town exec sacked over fertilizer scam

THE municipal treasurer of Guimbal, Iloilo was dismissed from service by the Office of the Ombudsman relative to the P728-million fertilizer fund scam during the Arroyo administration. Ma. Asuncion Isabel Gargalicano, who served as municipal treasurer in 2004, was removed from her post after she was found guilty of grave misconduct in the alleged anomalous […] The post Town exec sacked over fertilizer scam appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsNov 6th, 2017

Tale of 2 cities: Olympics sponsors in Pyeongchang and Tokyo

em>By Youkyung Lee and Mari Yamaguchi, Associated Press /em> SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — The Winter Olympics coming to South Korea in February offer an example of the Olympian efforts often required to meet corporate sponsorship goals. Tokyo tells a different story: The coffers are already overflowing for the 2020 Summer Games. It's a tale of two cities and two Olympics — winter and summer. Pyeongchang is a little-known destination in one of South Korea's poorest provinces. It is the 'little town that could,' bidding twice unsuccessfully for the Winter Olympics before winning on its third try. A final push enabled it to reach its sponsorship target of 940 billion won ($830 million) in September, with just five months to go. Tokyo is an established global capital, and the Summer Games usually generate more excitement — and more money. Organizers have raised 300 billion yen ($2.7 billion) in sponsorship, twice any previous Olympics. International Olympic Committee Vice President John Coates describes it as a remarkable achievement. The divergent experiences of two Asian host cities illustrate the challenges that smaller bidders face, as well as South Korea's dependence on the big family-owned companies that dominate its economy. Not that Tokyo is home-free. The cost of the 2020 Games has nearly doubled from initial projections. As with most Olympics, taxpayers will have to foot a good part of the bill. ___ strong>WHERE 'CHAEBOLS' RULE /strong> Starting with the 1988 Seoul Olympics, South Korea has used mega-events such as the soccer World Cup to raise the profile of the country and its manufacturing exporters. Pyeongchang is different. The project was initiated by local politicians in an area long alienated politically and economically in South Korea's rise to prosperity. Some feared people would confuse the city's name with Pyongyang, the North Korean capital. They couldn't count on the automatic support of the huge family-run conglomerates, known as 'chaebol,' such as Samsung, Hyundai and LG. 'When such mega-events were the nation-state's key project, the chaebol were called on and were expected to become the leading participants,' said Joo Yu-min, a professor at the National University of Singapore who co-authored a book on South Korea's use of mega-events. In the end, the national government brought the conglomerates in, first in the bid process, and then for sponsorship. That underscores both the outsized role they play in the economy and their close ties with government. They owe a debt to special treatment from the government, which in turn used them to industrialize the country after the devastating 1950-53 Korean War. After Pyeongchang's bid was rejected a second time, the government called on Samsung and others to help. The president even pardoned Lee Kun-hee, the patriarch of the Samsung founding family who had been an IOC member but voluntarily suspended his membership after being indicted for tax evasion. The IOC reinstated Lee in 2010 with a reprimand and some restrictions, allowing him to lobby heavily for what became Pyeongchang's winning bid in 2011. It took three years for the organizing committee to sign its first domestic sponsor, KT Corp., the country's second-largest mobile carrier. Again, the national government asked the conglomerates for help. All the major ones signed on, after the office of then-President Park Geun-hye made a special request and multichannel pressures for financial assistance, Joo said. Elsewhere, companies may weigh sponsorship decisions based more on the marketing benefits. 'In South Korea, companies make donations out of a sense of duty that they are being part of the national event,' said Park Dong Min, the executive director overseeing membership at the Korea Chamber of Commerce and Industry. Sponsors who signed up late weren't willing to give as much, because there was less time to enjoy the marketing benefits. A bank that signed on less than a year before the Games significantly reduced its sponsorship. To top it off, a massive sports-related political corruption scandal rocked South Korea in 2016, just when Pyeongchang was making last-ditch efforts to raise sponsorship. 'Companies showed some reluctance' to sponsor the Olympics, said Eom Chanwang, director of the Pyeongchang organizing committee marketing team. 'Nevertheless, they still joined.' The scandal brought down Park, the president. Lee Jae-yong, the heir to the Samsung group, received a five-year sentence for bribery. Lee, who has appealed, had become de facto chief of the Samsung group after his father Lee Kun-hee, the IOC member pardoned in late 2009, fell ill. It was the younger Lee who signed an agreement with IOC President Thomas Bach to extend Samsung Electronics' sponsorship of the Olympics globally through 2020. Samsung declined interviews for this story. With the scandal still fresh in people's minds, major companies have held back from launching full-fledged marketing to promote the Games. 'Samsung traditionally has done consumer marketing through the Olympics, but because its chief is in jail, it cannot do as much these days,' said Kim Do-kyun, a sports professor at Kyung Hee University Graduate School of Physical Education. The Pyeongchang Games were the biggest victim of the scandal, he said. ___ strong>SUMMER OF '64 /strong> The president of Japan's biggest toilet manufacturer was seven years old when the Olympics first came to Japan. TOTO Ltd. made news in 1964 for its prefabricated toilet-and-bath units that helped speed the construction of a luxury hotel, the New Otani, in time for the Games. The company, now known for high-tech toilets that baffle some foreign visitors, is back as a sponsor of Tokyo 2020. 'I feel our company and the Olympics have been bonded by fate,' TOTO president Madoka Kitamura said at a sponsorship signing ceremony at the same hotel last year. The $2.7 billion in sponsorship for Tokyo 2020 is more than three times the original estimate. By comparison, sponsorship revenue was $848 million in Rio de Janeiro last year, and about $1.2 billion for both London 2012 and Beijing 2008. The Winter Olympics typically attract less, though Sochi, Russia, raised $1.2 billion in 2014. Analysts attribute Tokyo's success to both patriotism and a sense of nostalgia for the 1964 Summer Games. They were much more than a sports contest for Japan. They were a moment of pride, marking the country's return as an industrial power after the devastation of World War II and a seven-year U.S. occupation. 'All of Japan still recognizes the unique role that the 1964 Olympics played in Japan's stepping out onto the world stage,' said Michael Payne, a former IOC marketing director who now works as a consultant. 'Many of the CEOs of top Japanese companies would have been young kids back in '64 and are very aware of the role those Games played for the psychological recovery from the Second World War.' They grew up with the high-speed 'Shinkansen' bullet train, inaugurated in 1964; modern expressways and western-style toilets, all symbols of Japan's postwar economic growth. 'Now they have become business leaders, they want to contribute and leave something behind that can be remembered for the next 50 years,' said Masahiko Sakamaki, executive director of marketing for the Tokyo organizing committee. He said that memories of the recovery may have boosted interest in sponsorship, as Japan was still reeling from a deadly 2011 earthquake and tsunami when Tokyo won the bid in 2013. Sakamaki said the organizing committee started receiving sponsorship inquiries as soon as it was established in 2014, before the official start of sponsorship contracts in 2015. There is so much interest that the IOC is allowing Tokyo to have multiple sponsors in some categories, instead of the usual one, including in aviation, newspaper publishing, electronics and banking. TOTO officials won't say how much they are contributing, but media reports say companies in its sponsorship category give between 6 billion and 15 billion yen ($53 million to $133.5 million). Tokyo 2020 wouldn't comment on those reports. 'We believe our presence as part of an all-Japan effort toward a successful Olympics will enhance our favorable brand image,' said Mariko Shibasaki, the company's senior planner for sports communication. Thanks in part to robust sponsorship revenue, the organizing committee has increased its contribution to the cost of the games from 500 billion to 600 billion yen ($5.3 billion). The sponsorship revenue makes up half of the income in the privately-run organizing committee's operating budget. Other revenue comes from the International Olympic Committee, marketing and ticket sales. The overall cost of the Tokyo Olympics is estimated at 1.4 trillion yen (12.4 billion) with the Tokyo government shouldering 600 billion yen ($5.3 billion) and the remaining 200 billion yen (1.8 billion) paid by the national government and local governments hosting events. ___ em>Yamaguchi reported from Tokyo. Associated Press writer Stephen Wade in Rio de Janeiro contributed to this story. /em> .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsOct 12th, 2017

Asia under water: How 137 million people’s lives are being put at risk – CNN News

Khorsheeda Khatun had been left with nothing &'8212; then that too was washed away. The 28-year-old fled her home country of Myanmar in January with her two daughters, escaping the latest outbreak of violence, and was living in the Kutupalang Makeshift Settlement in Bangladesh when cyclone Mora arrived five months later and displaced up to 500,000 people. &'8220;My house was shattered. It broke the wooden planks supporting my hut and blew away the polythene rooftop. The wind and water destroyed whatever little possessions we had,&'8221; she told UNICEF workers in June. Several weeks later, across the Himalayas in South China, over 12 million people were forced to flee their homes as flood waters rose for yet another year. In China's southeastern Jiangxi province alone, flooding this year has so far caused $430 million in damages and economic losses. In neighboring Hunan province, 53,000 homes have been destroyed &'8212; and the flooding has yet to fully recede. Increasingly severe weather, triggered by climate change, is putting hundreds of millions of people at risk across the rapidly developing countries of southern Asia. &'8220;In the next 30 years, it is projected that heavy rainfall events will be increasing &' in Asia, by about 20% for sure,&'8221; climate scientist Dewi Kirono at Australia's Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) told CNN. Southern Asia is already the wettest area on the continent and one of the wettest regions in the world,receiving an average of at least 1000mm of rainfall a year. As the rains fall harder, more than 137 million people in India, Bangladesh and China will be put at risk of coastal or inland flooding, more people than in the rest of the Asia-Pacific combined, a study in 2012 found. Aggravating flooding through poor drainage and short-sighted planning is the sprawling, rapid urban growth across South Asia, built to accommodate the millions of rural residents moving to cities. &'8220;You still have to have proper draining. It was a green field and now it's an urban area. Quite often, if you don't do that, (because) you've concreted everything the flood run-off is so much higher and the deaths are much worse,&'8221; Oxford University visiting fellow and WWF advisor Paul Sayers told CNN. The majority of flood-related deaths and injuries worldwide since 1950 have been in three countries: China, India and Bangladesh. According to statistics from Belgium's Universite Catholique de Louvain's Emergency Events Database, since 1950, more than 2.2 million people in these countries have been killed by flooding. That includes the estimated two million people who died during the disastrous 1959 floods in China. The world's leading authority of climate change, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), wrote in its latest report the Asia region was already suffering &'8220;huge economic losses&'8221; from weather and climate disasters, with one quarter of the entire world's economic losses from disasters in Asia alone. As flood swept through central China in July 2017, leaving devastation in its wake and almost 90 people dead or missing, locals took to Weibo to express their horror. &'8220;The road is blocked, the electricity is downed, water is polluted, no phone signal is detected, elderly (people) and children are waiting for food,&'8221; said one user living in Shilong Village in Hunan province. Photos accompanying the post showed cracked walls, piles of trash and mud everywhere. &'8220;The major district has turned to a dead city,&'8221; another user said. Almost every year in the past decade, more than 1,000 people have died in China, India and Bangladesh from flooding, according to the Database, and millions of dollars in damage has been done. The problem centers around three of the great Himalayan rivers of South and East Asia: The Ganges, Brahmaputra and Yangtze. About 500 million people, or 50% of the population in India and Bangladesh, and about 300 million people, or about 25% of the population of China, live within the flood basins of these three rivers. Taken together, the three waterways support an estimated 14% of the world's total population. In China alone, the enormous Yangtze flood plain, full of fertile soil and easy river access, is responsible forabout 40% of China's GDP. &'8220;Many Asian cities, and especially some megacities, have been built in the deltas of major rivers where ports could link the cities to the global economy,&'8221; a report by the Asian Development Bank in 2012 said. When the heavy rains higher up in the flood plains flow into these rivers, water levels rise dramatically &'8212; and floodwaters pour into the surrounding cities and towns. For example, this year, torrential rains caused a Yangtze tributary in Hunan to rise a record 3.2 meters above the warning level, bursting its banks and swamping crops and houses. Still, these factors have been here for years. Why is the danger growing now? Flooding in urban environments is more costly in terms of lives and loss of property because without a natural way to disperse the floodwaters they can cause damage &'8220;beyond the scope of the actual (flood),&'8221; experts say. &'8220;A lot of the urbanization &' has happened in a largely unplanned matter. For instance they don't have risks adequately taken into account, they don't invest enough in sustainable drainage,&'8221; Abhas Jha, the World Bank sector manager for Transport, Urban and Disaster Risk Management for East Asia and the Pacific, said. Of course the huge rush of rural residents to China and India's cities hasn't helped, as cities expand deeper into floodplains and build hurriedly to accommodate their citizens. [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJul 25th, 2017

DA: P1.12-billion grant from Hungary to fund study on cleaning up Manila Bay, rivers - Business Mirror

DA: P1.12-billion grant from Hungary to fund study on cleaning up Manila Bay, rivers - Business Mirror.....»»

Category: newsSource:  googlenewsRelated NewsMay 25th, 2017

Fish port, flee market rise in Zamboanga town

ZAMBOANGA CITY – The Bureau of Fisheries and Aquatic Resources (BFAR-9) in tandem with the municipal government  of Sibuco, Zamboanga del Norte will formally inaugurate  on Tuesday,  the newly completed   P4.8 Million fish landing and flee market in Sibuco. &'160; Sibuco Mayor Norbideiri B. Edding said the newly completed fish landing coupled with a flee market will  jointly inaugurate by BFAR officials, his  government and members of the Sangguniang Bayan on Tuesday morning. &'160; Edding said  the place which is strategically located at  Barangay Poblacion   will also served as  flee market where farmers and fishermen can both sell their  catch   and  farm produce products. &'160; “The place can served as fish landing site at the same time the  flee market  will served as  a convergence of farmers where they can sell their farm produce products,” Edding said. &'160; According to Edding, few people knows that the  town is supplying farm  products to Zamboanga City like bananas, sweet potatoes and others. &'160; Fishermen of the  town also supplies high valued fish of various varieties to Zamboanga City while some of the fishermen  are selling  their catch to  fish traders who are engaged in  transporting fish to other major cities in the country like Cagayan de Oro, Davao City Cebu City and Manila for a good market price. &'160; Sibuco consist of 28 barangays and   is treated like a suburb of neighboring Zamboanga City. (ely dumaboc) 78&'160;total views, 77&'160;views today.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsApr 21st, 2017

$228.5-million Cebu bus transit system gets funding support

MANILA, Philippines - Funding for the conduct of feasibility study and transaction advisory services for the Cebu Bus Rapid Transit (BRT) project has been ap.....»»

Category: financeSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 5th, 2017

China gives P4-B aid for infra, drug rehab

MANILA, Philippines -  The Chinese government is providing the Philippines a grant worth 550 million yuan (about P4 billion) to fund an “iconic” infrastructu.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 15th, 2017

Cops nab suspect in P3.4-M CCT fund heist in Albay

LEGAZPI CITY, Philippines – After nearly 6 months, police finally caught one of the alleged robbers of the P3.4-million state aid to over a thousand poor families in Rapu-Rapu town in Albay, under the Pantawid ng Pamilyang Pilipino Program (4Ps), o.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsJul 17th, 2016

Cebu-based developer invests PHP430M to build 709 townhouse units in north Cebu town

CEBU CITY, Dec. 17 (PNA) — Cebu-based developer Primary Homes Inc. (PHI) is investing PHP430 million to build 709 townhouse units in its 5.4-hectare property in Poblacion, Compostela town in........»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinestodaRelated NewsJul 17th, 2016

Aklan students into shipbuilding

MANILA, Philippines — The Department of Science and Technology (DOST) has allotted a funding grant of P66.5 million to an effort of the Aklan State Universit.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 22nd, 2018

BJMP to construct 8 new jails in Region 2

TUGUEGARAO CITY, Cagayan, March 21(PIA) -- TheBureau of Jail Management and Penology (BJMP)has allotted at least P260 million fund for the construction of eight additional jails and facilities regionw.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsMar 21st, 2018

BJMP to construct 8 new jails in Region 2

TUGUEGARAO CITY, Cagayan, March 21(PIA) -- TheBureau of Jail Management and Penology (BJMP)has allotted at least P260 million fund for the construction of eight additional jails and facilities regionw.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsMar 21st, 2018

Dominguez urges LGUs to tap climate change project funds

THE Department of Finance (DoF) has advised local government units (LGUs) to tap its funding programs for climate change adaptation and disaster risk reduction. These programs include the People’s Survival Fund (PSF) and the Municipal Development Fund (MDF) administered by the DoF’s Municipal Development Fund Office (MDFO). “The first one is a grant that we […] The post Dominguez urges LGUs to tap climate change project funds appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsMar 19th, 2018

Villar hails passage of bill creating the coconut industry trust fund

March 18, 2018. Sen. Cynthia Villar said that the passage of the bill creating the coconut industry trust fund addresses the decades-old issue surrounding the coconut levy fund and how it can be used for the direct benefit of 3.5 million coconut farmers in the country. The Senate passed on Second Reading Senate… Source link link: Villar hails passage of bill creating the coconut industry trust fund.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsMar 19th, 2018

Cebu s Alegria Oil Field can power 60-megawatt gas plant – DOE

MANILA, Philippines – The Alegria Oil Field in southern Cebu can power a 60-megawatt (MW) gas plant, said Energy Secretary Alfonso Cusi. "Initial study shows that it can support a 60-MW plant. They are working on it, preparing. This will help the power supply in Visayas, especially Cebu," Cusi told ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsMar 18th, 2018