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Action meets comedy on & lsquo;Switch& rsquo;

Action meets comedy on & lsquo;Switch& rsquo;.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource: thestandard thestandardOct 11th, 2018

ONE Championship: A win away from a second title run, greatness once again within reach for Eduard Folayang

Eduard Folayang’s mixed martial arts career can best be described as ‘up-and-down.’ Throughout his eleven year career as a professional MMA fighter, Folayang has reached the highest of highs and has fallen to the lowest of lows, and his current run in ONE Championship is no different. In 2016, following a run that saw him go 6-3 in the promotion, Folayang reached pinnacle of his career after dethroning Japanese MMA legend Shinya Aoki to become the ONE Lightweight World Champion. Another high in the career of the Baguio City native, who many considered to be the face of Philippine MMA at that point. Then, a year later, as the trend in his career goes, Folayang was knocked off from his spot at the top and was sent crashing down courtesy of a right hand from Martin Nguyen. Just like that, Folayang was again in a valley. The 35-year old is no stranger to adversity. He was able to rise back up in 2016, and now, he’s done just that again. A little over a year after losing the belt to Nguyen in Manila, Folayang gets a shot at history, but more importantly, he gets a shot at redemption. At ONE: Conquest of Champions in Manila, Folayang has the opportunity to become a two-time world champion when he meets Singapore’s Amir Khan for the vacant ONE Lightweight World Champion. If Folayang pull it off, he becomes the first two-time ONE Lightweight World Champion in the promotion’s history. If Folayang pulls it off, he recaptures the crown in the very same arena that he lost it in, just twelve months prior. “Siyempre masayang-masaya ako, kasi it took me one year ulit para maka-balik sa title picture, and pinag-hirapan naman natin,” Folayang told ABS-CBN Sports. “We faced two undefeated Russians and naging dominant naman yung performance natin, and for sure, napaka-exciting yung magiging laban na ito, especially since tinalo ni Amir Khan yung teammate natin na si Honorio Banario, so it will be a good fight for both of us.” Folayang knows all too well how his career has gone, and the former Wushu standout says that in order to be able to keep moving forward, one must not keep himself in the past. Whether wins or losses, “Landslide” says that he does not dwell on them too much. “Hindi tayo nagde-dwell sa past, kasi kung magde-dwell ako sa mga past victories tsaka mga defeat, parang hindi ako magmo-move on.” “ Kaya dun natin na-aappreciate ang martial arts, it’s really a journey kung saan sasabihin natin na tapos na tayo or na-achieve na natin yung highest na standard kasi in some ways, we will win some and some ways we will lose, pero  yung napaka-ganda doon ay kapag natatalo tayo, mayroon at mayroon tayong chance para ayusin yung areas na nagkamali tayo at magkaroon ng chance para manalo ulit and as much as possible maibalik natin yung nawala sa atin,” he continued. As far as second chances go, Folayang has had his fair share. Now, he gets another chance at being the top lightweight in the promotion, and he believes it’s all because he never quit, even after all the adversity he has faced in his career. “Yun yung pinaka-masaya dito sa pagiging isang martial artist, we are given a second chance as long as we are breathing and as long as we never give up.” Folayang’s road back to the championship picture took him a little over 365 days. In that period, Folayang proved that he was still a top-tier lightweight after defeating a pair of undefeated Russian grapplers in Kharun Atlangeriev and Aziz Pahrudinov. When Martin Nguyen vacated the belt back in September, immediately, Folayang was in the front of the line in terms of contenders. In that 12-month period, Folayang admits that it wasn’t the easiest. Having to deal with such a loss and then having to work your way back isn’t a walk in the park. But the former champion believes that it was necessary for him to go through that in order to evolve even more. “Yung journey, every day talaga, kailangan mo din mag-struggle, mag-struggle na kung saan you will always aim to improve, you will always aim to learn kung ano yung strengths and weaknesses ng kalaban mo until you will go on that day na parang mag-eexam ka ulit and you will see na if you have improved after a year or not,” he shared. 378 days removed from his title loss, Folayang gets to test himself again, and if he passes, he becomes the top dog in the lightweight division. “Yung pinaka-test ko ulit after losing that belt is this coming November 23, and I’m excited going into that battle again. Sana maging two-time world champion.” Very rarely do fighters go undefeated in their professional careers, and they say that the true test of a champion is how he or she bounces back from adversity or defeat. Time and time again, Folayang has managed to bounce back. When people thought that he would never reach the top, he proved them wrong by becoming a champion. When people thought that he was done, he again proved them wrong by being where he is now. It’s through these kinds of struggles, Folayang says, that one learns about himself. It’s this kind of pressure that molds one to become a champion. “I believe na nakakatulong din [yung mga setbacks], although as much as possible din, ayaw natin ng ganun,” he said. “Pero siguro sa buhay hindi mo talaga masasabing upward palagi yung improvement, minsan talaga madudulas ka para makita mo yung space kung saan mag-iimprove ka pa, and makikita din talaga natin na everyone is improving, hindi lang tayo yung nag-iimprove tapos tapos na, no. “Everybody is chasing greatness, and kapag nagkamali tayo, maabutan tayo, pero we need to come up stronger ulit,” he added. At ONE: Conquest of Champions, Folayang once again finds himself one win away from a second run as the ONE Lightweight World Champion. Once again, greatness is within reach for Eduard Folayang.   Eduard Folayang meets Amir Khan for the vacant ONE Lightweight World Championship at ONE: Conquest of Champions this Friday, November 23rd at the Mall of Asia Arena in Manila. Catch the action LIVE on ABS-CBN S+A channel 23 beginning at 8:30 PM! .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 23rd, 2018

Draw of another title lights postseason path of Warriors

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst One of the Golden State Warriors’ people, walking out of Smoothie King Center Sunday (Monday, PHL time), summarized the team’s season so far in detailing Kevin Durant’s 38-point performance against the Pelicans in Game 4 of the Western Conference semifinals. “Sometimes, people forget,” he said, a wry smile on his face -- and, yes, they do. With all that has gone on around the league this season, the Warriors’ storyline hasn’t been quite as eyeballed nationally this season compared with previous years. (Not that they should care. It’s just an observation.) The Cleveland Cavaliers blew things up last summer and reformed in the fall, blew it up again in the winter and reformed again in the spring. The Boston Celtics are displaying amazing resilience through seemingly devastating injuries to put themselves on the brink of another conference finals. The Philadelphia 76ers have their Fun Bunch. There was Paul George’s trade to Oklahoma City (and all that entailed, now and later) and the Toronto Raptors’ dramatic and successful changes throughout the year. And, at the forefront, there was the Houston Rockets’ rise as a legit and serious challenger to the Warriors in the Western Conference. During the regular season, the Warriors’ energy and productivity dropped off ever so slightly, like the planet killer in “The Doomsday Machine,” one of the all-time best original “Star Trek” episodes, after the doomed Commodore Decker drove a Shuttlecraft right down its throat. (Of course, Captain Kirk figured out to destroy it. Dude, come on. This is James Tiberius Kirk we’re talking about.) And at the end of the regular season, they were hit with a series of body shot injuries: Stephen Curry’s MCL strain, Durant’s ribs, Klay Thompson’s thumb injury, Draymond Green’s hip, and on and on. Those all sapped their continuity and made them look mortal down the stretch of the 2017-18 season, and the Warriors went 7-10 as the season waned. But, after dispatching the Kawhi Leonard-less Spurs in five games in the first round, and taking a 3-1 lead on the Pelicans now, they’re again on the precipice of the Western Conference finals. A date with Houston is looming and a chance at a third title in four seasons is still on their racket. “I think as the playoffs go on, every series requires a different intensity level,” Green said last week. “I think we met that standard that it takes to win playoff games at the level we’re at right now, which is the second round. It’s not our first rodeo. We’ve been here a lot of times and we know what it takes.” Steve Kerr rolled the “Hamptons Five” lineup out Sunday (Monday, PHL time), the Lineup Formally Known as Death -- Curry, Thompson, Andre Iguodala, Green and Durant. It’s been their trump card for almost two years, the lineup that can’t be solved by the opposition, even as it’s chipped away at most of Golden State’s other conventional units. Durant went for 38, and the Warriors rolled to a 118-92 win and a 3-1 series lead. They didn’t use it much this season -- that quintet only played 127 minutes together this season, after logging 224 minutes last season -- because of all the injuries, because they tried to limit their biggest players’ minutes and because using Iguodala as a starter thins out Golden State’s bench. The Warriors’ most frequently used five-man unit this season featured Zaza Pachulia at center; among five-man units leaguewide that played 200 minutes or more together this season, per NBA.com/Stats, that quintet was third in the league in Offensive Rating, at 118.6. But Pachulia hasn’t played a minute in the playoffs, and if the Rockets are the Warriors’ next opponent, he may not play much then, either, against Clint Capela. Kerr often points out that the Warriors have six centers on the current roster, and most of them have gotten at least a little run at various points. But after JaVale McGee was ineffective in Game 3 against New Orleans Friday (Saturday, PHL time), Kerr pulled his trump card. It’s still a game-changer, and when a season comes down to a best-of-seven series, one game can be the difference. “We all bring the best of each other,” Curry said of the Hamptons unit. “We increase the pace of the game, but the versatility [is] at the defensive end -- Andre, Draymond, KD shoring up the paint, switching a lot of the screens and the action from the offense and Klay doing what he does on the perimeter. I think the biggest thing offensively is that we’re all playmakers, try to look for the best shot, stay within ourselves and just make the right play.” Going back to the old playlist may give the Warriors comfort in what has been another drama-filled season, with the contretemps about being disinvited from the White House by President Trump in September getting things off to a rollicking start. But the end of the season was what raised eyebrows around the league. Curry’s absence down the stretch combined with a teamwide ennui -- “I really don’t like talking about it,” Thompson said -- that gave potential playoff opponents hope they might be able to catch Golden State napping. The Warriors’ boredom showed up most at the defensive end. After being in the top seven in both unadjusted and adjusted Defensive Rating in each of the last four seasons -- including first in the league in both categories in the first championship season of 2014-15 -- Golden State fell to 11th and 12th, respectively, in the regular season. They came out of the All-Star break focused -- they were fifth in the league in Defensive Rating on March 1. But all the injuries blunted their momentum, and the scariest of all -- a serious injury to second-year guard Patrick McCaw in Sacramento March 31 (April 1, PHL time) -- shook the team more than people on the outside realized. “Throughout that time, we had spurts,” Durant said. “We played a great OKC team. We went in there and won. Then we lost to Indiana by 20, and then it’s like, when you’re riding just on emotion a lot, you tend to go up and down. It’s like a roller coaster. I think that’s what it was. We had those spurts where we played well and played a focused game, but then Patty goes out, boom, and there was just so much that went on with that. Then Steph goes out with a freak injury. So much went on with that. I think we were just so up and down emotionally it kind of blinded us from our goal, which was to be good every single night as basketball players.” McCaw’s injury -- a bone bruise suffered when he fell after a dunk attempt against the Kings, which required him to be carried off the court in Sacramento on a stretcher -- hit everyone hard. “When Pat got injured, I think that took a little bit out of us,” Durant said. “It took a little bit out of Steve as well. You could just feel it, when Steph went out, then I went out, then Draymond, then Klay. Our emotions were so up and down. When your emotions are, you have too many emotions in the game of basketball, it can kind of blind you from what you really have to do. This is a technical game. So when you put too many emotions into it, it kind of took us away from what we wanted to do.” McCaw, who played in 57 games this season, was not only a part of Kerr’s rotation. He is also a well-liked person who was getting better on the floor. He was re-evaluated last week and will be checked out again in a month. Though he’s been traveling with the team during the playoffs, his season is almost certainly over. And as his injury came during the Warriors’ many injuries down the stretch, its chilling effect was multiplied. “It definitely got to everybody,” Green said. “Kind of the uncertainty of not knowing what’s going on with him. The rotations. Everybody’s like, ahh, kind of tiptoeing around, trying to make sure you get to the playoffs healthy. A lot of that makes a difference. I mean, that’s our brother. To see him down like that, not be able to walk off the court under his own power, him not being around us for two or three weeks, it was kind of like the unknown. It sucked. And I think it definitely had an effect on everything.” But Durant doesn’t like the metaphor of the proverbial switch being turned on at playoff time explaining the team’s improvement the last couple of weeks. “I don’t like when you call it a switch,” he said. “Because guys come in and get extra work in every single day. They work on their bodies every day, they get treatment. You come in here any time, you see guys in here working on their games. I think when you say ‘a switch turned on,’ if guys went cold turkey on everything as professionals during the season, and just tried to pick it up in the playoffs, I think that’s turning on a switch. Mentally, focus-wise, game plan-wise, I think you can turn on a switch, because you can lock in on an opponent, you know their tendencies, you can just focus in on one group of players instead of one day it’s San Antonio, the next day it’s Phoenix, next day it’s Sacramento. You’re going so up and down. If that makes sense. “So I think everybody’s putting in that work individually all year, and as a team, you know, stuff has to come together. We have to focus in on what we need to do, game plan wise, tendency wise, just try to take away things. I think that’s where you kind of turn it up just a bit.” Golden State has performed in fits and starts in the first two rounds. The Spurs didn’t have enough firepower to be a serious threat, but they played hard and were increasingly effectively on defense as the series went on. The Warriors didn’t really have an answer for LaMarcus Aldridge after Game 1. New Orleans had, until Sunday (Monday, PHL time), been more and more successful at making the Warriors shoot contested shots. That certainly gibes with Curry’s return after five weeks. He’s healthy, but rusty. After his adrenaline-filled return last Tuesday (Wednesday, PHL time) in Game 2 against the Pelicans, he made just 14-of-33 from the floor in the two games in New Orleans. There was talk afterward about breakthroughs for Curry cardiovascularly. The next few games will tell whether Curry is truly recovered and ready to be two-time Kia MVP Steph … or will he just be on the floor (as he was for long and important stretches in the 2016 playoffs after returning from a Grade 1 knee sprain). The Warriors still made The Finals, but Curry wasn’t Curry against Cleveland, and everyone, starting and ending with LeBron James, knew it. No one in NBA history has changed the geometry of basketball more than Curry, and when he’s on the floor, the ball starts flying around. “Our formula is simple: if we out-pass people, we win,” Warriors forward David West said. “Ball movement. With guys going in and out of the lineup, it causes moments where guys try to carry the load, maybe try to shoulder the load individually. But the strength of the group is the group.” But the Warriors can still throw so many different things and people at you. Iguodala shot a career-worst 28.2 percent on three-pointers in the regular season. He’s at 39.3 percent in the 2018 playoffs. Does anyone doubt he was biding his time until the postseason? No one wearing an NBA uniform is in better shape than the 34-year-old Iguodala, no one is smarter about the game or matchups, and no one is a prouder, fiercer competitor. The 2015 Finals MVP brings his bag of intangibles with him on the road even more than at home, as he did Sunday. In that game, he was making life miserable for the Pelicans’ Nikola Mirotic, creating deflections, making the right reads and impacting the game despite scoring just six points. Kerr likened him to Scottie Pippen after Game 4, but Iggy wasn’t buying it -- “Steve just does that to make sure I don’t get mad ‘cause I don’t shots,” Iguodala quipped. He may be right. But Iguodala and Green have a mind meld defensively that’s at the heart of the Hamptons’ effectiveness. “Andre and I, we’re usually on the same page,” Green said. “Two guys who really think the game, especially on that side of the ball. Sometimes we can talk things out and it works perfect and not say a word, and know what each other’s going to do. It definitely helps our team out defensively kind of having two coaches out there on the floor on that side of the ball.” Whether it’s switching to guard each other’s man, running at an open shooter to close before the ball gets there with the other man rotating, they know what the other guy is going to do. And that second or so the Warriors save defensively keeps them from being broken down. “How fast can you make that decision?,” Green says. “How demonstrative are you going to be about that decision? Are you going to second guess that decision? That’s usually when it doesn’t work; if you’re going to go, just go. That’s kind of the motto that Andre and I go by. If you’re going to go, just go; everybody else fall in line and rotate, and we’ll work it out from there.” And while Green and Rajon Rondo have been exchanging pleasantries throughout this series, Green didn’t pick up his first postseason technical foul until Sunday (Monday, PHL time). He’s been under control, coming up to the edge without going over. Someone without access to the internet asked Kerr if he’d ever played with anyone who instigated or tried to get under the skin of opponents. It’s a testament to Kerr’s comic timing that he actually did wait a beat before answering. “I did play with Dennis Rodman,” he said. Never be fooled by Kerr’s overall pleasant disposition and quick-with-a-quip acuity, though. He is a fierce competitor that wants to win big, the same as his current point guard, who is similarly underrated on the competition scale. Kerr has seven rings as a player and coach, and it’s not a coincidence he’s frequently been around teams that got it done in June. But the Warriors are playing for even bigger stakes than just winning the 2018 title. Legacies are created this time of year. A third title in four seasons, with four straight Finals appearances, would put Golden State in very rarified air in the modern game. San Antonio won three titles from 2002-07. But the Spurs, famously, never have won back-to-back titles. The Kobe Bryant-Shaquille O’Neal-led Lakers, which won three straight from 2000-02, are the closest modern-day team to pulling off what the Warriors are trying to accomplish. Before then, you’re talking about the Michael Jordan-led Chicago Bulls, with six titles in eight seasons -- the two non-title seasons coinciding with Jordan’s sojourn to the minor leagues of baseball. Moreover, the Warriors are the hub around which the modern NBA now spins. And that is an even bigger legacy. Almost everyone (hi, Thibs!) tries to play the way Golden State does now -- the quick hitters, ball movement, pace. Teams do it in different ways. The 76ers look very different than the Warriors, with Joel Embiid their centerpiece of operations, and with 6'10" Ben Simmons taking up so much space with the ball in the halfcourt. The Rockets look different still as there’s not a ton of ball movement. There’s just an unending series of screen and rolls with Chris Paul and James Harden with the rock, looking for the inevitable open man in the corner or way, way behind the three-point line. A lot of things have happened the last 15 years to lead us where we are now. The league changed almost all the rules regarding zone defense, and got rid of almost all defensive contact on the perimeter. Rockets GM Daryl Morey and others led the burgeoning analytics movement, which championed shooting more and more three-pointers as a primary means of scoring, not as a novelty. Mike D’Antoni’s Phoenix Suns went with Amar’e Stoudemire at center, surrounding him with four smalls that could all shoot it from deep, and scoring came out of its coma leaguewide. Kerr and Pelicans Coach Alvin Gentry have always been quick to credit D’Antoni’s influence on the modern game, starting in Phoenix and working through his current team in Houston. “He’s the guy that just eliminated the center position -- let’s just go small and fast and shoot more threes,” Kerr said of D’Antoni. “I was inspired by Mike, but I was also inspired by Pop (the Spurs’ Gregg Popovich) and Phil Jackson in terms of basic ball movement, screening. But pace is the name of the game these days, and people go about it in different ways. Ironically, Mike’s team (in Houston) is the slowest team in the league now. I didn’t see that coming.” But no one has put all of it together -- pace, small ball, shooting and defense -- like the Warriors have the last four seasons. The Rockets are the closest thing we’ve seen to Golden State, and they’re hungry, and they’re coming. And the Warriors and Rockets are just a win apiece away from seeing the clash of the Western Conference titans. They are in the middle of it, so they can’t stop and think about what it all means. We get that. But everyone wants to put a marker out there that’s hard to catch. LeBron is chasing a ghost. The Warriors have already made their mark on the game. They’re almost in position to do more. History is forever. “It’s important, because it’s what’s right in front of us,” Curry said Sunday. “We don’t think about the historical context of anything. For us, we have an amazing group of guys, amazing coaches sitting behind us. We’re appreciating the moment. That’s really all it is. You have tunnel vision for Game 5 at home, then a new series, hopefully (after that). The historic context doesn’t really seep into the locker room when it comes to what that means. It’s just about this year.” Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMay 8th, 2018

Harden, Rockets pass first postseason test

By Sekou Smith, NBA.com HOUSTON — If the long road to June basketball is to come to fruition for the best regular-season team in basketball, it had to start like this for the Houston Rockets. That first step, that first foray into the great postseason abyss, required this sort of confirmation from the No. 1 overall seed in the entire tournament, so to speak. There’s no room for Cinderellas around here, no slaying of Goliath, not on Clint Capela’s watch. Not with James Harden on the case when the Rockets needed it most, and especially at crunch time. And not with Chris Paul, chip planted firmly on his shoulder as always, eyeballing bigger and better things than being the best from late October to mid-April. So it won’t be easy. Nobody said it would be. And let’s be clear, the Minnesota Timberwolves are not a normal eight seed. Not really. A healthy Jimmy Butler and the infusion of veteran talent that helped end the second longest playoff drought in NBA history this season makes that big a difference. They certainly did Sunday night (Monday, PHL time) at Toyota Center, when the Rockets were forced to battle until the very end for a 104-101 win despite a 44-point masterpiece from Harden. But like everyone else who dealt with these juggernaut Rockets all season long, Harden and his crew proved to be too much with the game on the line. With Harden on the bench and the game tied at 85 with 6:49 to play, the script was already written. He came in for Paul with 6:07 to play and the Rockets up a point, and promptly scored on a driving layup. He stole the ball and then scored on a driving floater. After a Capela block, he scored on a driving layup. By the time he knocked down a three-pointer with 4:27 left, the Rockets’ lead was back up to eight points, 94-86, and it was clear that Harden was going to do whatever it took — scoring, playmaking and even defending — to keep Game 1 from going awry. It was vintage work from the maestro who has owned the floor most every night since the season opener, when Harden and the Rockets went into Oracle Arena as the reigning champion Golden State Warriors hung another banner and collected those diamond-laced title rings and walked off the floor winners. “Another day for James,” Rockets coach Mike D’Antoni said after Harden finished one point shy of his playoff career-high. “He’s done it all year and he really stepped up. We were struggling to make shots, struggling to really have any kind of rhythm of play and James put us on his back and he’s been doing it for a while now.” D’Antoni will have to forgive the rest of us, including the frontrunner for the Kia MVP this season, for not digesting his theory about the playoffs being something other than a referendum on his team’s magical regular season. Harden operated like someone keenly aware of what was at stake with the Timberwolves, each and every one of them, trying in vain to slow him down. “Honestly, I just try to be aggressive and make the right play,” Harden said. “Things got slowed up a little bit, just try to be aggressive with my shot and fortunately it went in.” Jimmy Butler is an All-Star and one of the league’s best two-way players. Derrick Rose is a former Kia MVP himself, and still has enough juice left to make things difficult for someone when he locks in the way he did on this night. And neither one of them had any luck slowing Harden down during his second-half blitz. He scored 25 of his points in the final 18 minutes, making play after play when the Timberwolves appeared to be on the verge of potentially pulling off a shocker. “There were several plays in which I thought we defended well and he made shots,” Timberwolves coach Tom Thibodeau said. “James is that type of player and we’ve seen it all year, [he’s] very difficult to guard. Basically, you have to guard him with your whole team. And it’s not just his scoring, but his playmaking and all the things that he does.” The Rockets won on a night when they shot a brutal 27 percent (10-for-37) from beyond the three-point line, where they’ve feasted on the opposition all season. They roasted the Timberwolves from distance during their regular season match ups to the tune of 43.4 percent and more than doubled them up in three-point makes during those games, but made just two more Sunday night (Monday, PHL time). Harden was 7-for-12 from deep, a playoff career-high for makes, while the rest of the Rockets shot a combined 3-for-25. And he was draining his shots with hands in his face routinely. “He’s an MVP candidate and you know why,” said Timberwolves big man Taj Gibson. “Every time the game was ‘mono e mono’ and they were in a tight spot, he just took over the game. He made some tough shots, he played phenomenal tonight. We were trying to throw everything at him, he’s a talented player.” He’s clearly much more than that. “I mean yeah, he’s a hell of a player,” Butler said. “Everyone knows that. But you don’t just guard him with one guy. It’s everybody out there, everybody has to be in the correct position. Challenge shots; contest them at the rim, but more than anything, if there is a miss we’ve got to get the rebound and take off the other way. But we didn’t do any of that tonight, we’ve got to be better [in Game 2] on Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time).” Thibodeau had to turn to his bench to stay in the game before halftime and they delivered, scoring 19 points and playing with an energy level that matched what the Rockets did regardless of who was on the floor. Rose (nine points), Jamal Crawford (seven) and Gorgui Dieng (three) did all that bench scoring, which was the only way to offset the furious 49 points Capela and Harden combined for before the break. Jeff Teague’s three fouls and Butler’s defensive task, trying to keep Harden under wraps, required so much of his attention that the scoring load had to be picked up by someone else. He went scoreless in the first quarter and just never seemed to get untracked early on, finishing with just 13 points on 4-for-11 shooting. It’s an issue the Timberwolves won’t be able to scheme their way out of in this series, not as long as Capela is the most energetic and effective young big man on either team. He outscored the All-Star Towns 20-3 before the break and out rebounded him 10-5, adding two blocks and a steal to drive home the point that he’s up for this challenge all series long. “Man, Clint was all over the place, both ends of the court offensively and defensively,” Paul said. “You see him defending KAT, who’s a tough cover in the post. You know I’m low, and I weak side and I’m watching him go up for the hook, and then I’m watching Clint block it, and then he’s running. he was unbelievable tonight and we’re going to need that all season.” Capela finished his night with 24 points, 12 rebounds and three blocks while Towns didn’t crack double digits in the scoring column (eight points on 3-for-9 shooting, 12 rebounds in a team-high 40 minutes of action). Chalk it up as a lesson learned for the playoff rookie. That must-win game the Timberwolves won at home over Denver Wednesday night had all the hype and intensity of a playoff game, only it wasn’t. Thibodeau credited the Rockets’ defense, the swarming and double-teaming of Towns, for slowing the big man down. “He has to be more active,” Thibodeau said, before praising the Rockets for perhaps their most underrated trait this season: The ability to lock down defensively. “They’re good, they’re very good. They’re tied together, they do a lot of switching and after the switch they read the ball extremely well. They react, they swarm, and so you have ti make good decisions, you have to make good plays. You have to have the ability to read and react.” Funny, that’s what the Rockets’ best player does perhaps as well as any other player in the league right now. Harden reads and reacts accordingly, always seemingly coming up with the right play at the right time. That’s how you know he’s in the moment right now, as are the rest of the Rockets. No matter how many times and how many different ways anyone tries to deflect attention from the obvious, they comprehend every bit of what lies ahead for a team riding into the postseason on the strength of a 65-win regular season that saw them run away from the competition. They wouldn’t have souls if they didn’t. They wouldn’t be human if they hadn’t already calculated the weight of the best regular season in franchise history times a wide-open postseason equaling something that’s never been done here, which says a lot for a franchise that has two Larry O’Brien trophies to show off. They know how important each and every step on this current journey is, starting with Sunday night’s very first choppy ones. Any suggestion to the contrary is, shall we say, a distant cousin of the truth. But we’ll play along for now, at the beginning. Sekou Smith is a veteran NBA reporter and NBA TV analyst. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsApr 16th, 2018

Warriors keep evolving in rivalry with Cavs

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com CLEVELAND -- You might expect, given the familiarity from what’s gone on for four years now, that the Golden State Warriors and Cleveland Cavaliers have worked up some serious mutual contempt. They both covet what the other wants -- in fact, the Warriors or the Cavs could make a persuasive case that, if not for the other guys, one already would have notched a three-peat and be chasing Bill Russell’s Celtics in pursuit of a fourth consecutive championship. They both have poured buckets of blood, sweat, tears, money, Gatorade and offseason counter moves into their nouveau NBA rivalry. And they both, well, as Golden State coach Steve Kerr phrased it to the San Jose Mercury News Sunday (Monday, PHL time), “We just want to kick each other’s ass.” And yet the Warriors and the Cavaliers -- who play again Monday (Tuesday, PHL time) at Quicken Loans Arena in the NBA’s prime-time MLK showdown -- have more in common with each other than they do with any of the league’s other 28 teams. Playing 100 games or so every year. Locking in mentally and surviving physically longer than anyone else. Showing up each night targeted as a measuring stick, even a season maker, by the opponents. While trying like heck to keep things fresh. Renew. Find and tap into a new source of energy, because old ones wane over time. “It’s the biggest challenge of this whole season,” Kerr told NBA.com late last week, with the Warriors starting a back-to-back in Milwaukee and Toronto on their way back to The Land. Even if it were possible -- and it realistically is not, given free agency, injuries, trades, the salary cap, luxury taxes, hirings and firings each NBA offseason -- playing a pat hand from one championship-level season to the next isn’t desirable. Voices, locker rooms, relationships get stale. Rivals adjust and escalate in the arms race. Some players ebb in the pecking order, others flow. It’s important to inject new faces, add skills and even find fresh themes to fend off monotony, even boredom, through the 82-game slogs. The Warriors, in winning 20 of 23 games over the past seven weeks, largely have managed to do that. The Cavaliers, at 26-15 after 2-7 stretch that started at Golden State on Christmas (Dec. 26, PHL time)? Not so much. Golden State shifts gears after each season It’s easy to think of Golden State’s success since Kerr’s hiring before the 2014-15 season as one uninterrupted run of excellence. Three-pointers, “death lineups,” and the rest. But the differences from one year to the next have been fairly pronounced. “In Year 1, we were trying to prove ourselves to the world,” Kerr said. “Then we win the championship -- it was all so fresh. There were no letdowns at all that year. It was the most exciting, it was the most energized, it was the most refreshing. It was brand new to all of us. It felt like we were riding this wave all year -- we were all giddy, like, ‘Oh my God, we’re really good!’ We didn’t know we could be like that. And for me, it was my first year coaching.” Steph Curry won his first MVP award. He and Klay Thompson generated considerable conversation about the best shooting backcourts in league history. Draymond Green forever changed the old NBA notion of “’tweeners.” The Warriors finished 67-15, ranked second in the league in offense (111.6) and first in defense (101.4) and beat Cleveland in the Finals in six games. “It was maybe like the first stages when you fall in love,” Kerr said. “You’re just on Cloud 9 and she can’t do anything wrong. There’s infatuation and then you truly fall in love, and it’s amazing. “The second year, we sort of rode that wave of euphoria of being the best team in the league and having won the title. The next thing you know, we’re 24-0 and we’ve got a chance to set an all-time record. That 73-win mark carried us all year. We were going to prove that, not only were we the champs but we were one of the best teams ever.” The Warriors were -- by regular season standards. Curry won his second MVP award. Kerr missed the first 43 games due to health issues but assistant coach Luke Walton steered them to a 39-4 mark. They bought into the chase for 73 victories fairly late, but instead of a 16-5 playoff run like the previous spring’s, the Warriors went 15-9 -- coming up one victory short when the Cavaliers became the first team to claw back from a 3-1 deficit. That led directly to Golden State’s next new wrinkle, a reconfiguration that came close to buckling the league’s knees. “We got KD,” Kerr said. “Now we’re changing our team, right? Last year was about incorporating KD, welcoming this incredible player into our organization and our roster. Figuring how to do it, how we were going to adjust. I felt like there were times last year that were tiring, where our guys were done a little bit. But it was ‘new’ again.” Even the challenges were fresh, like counting Curry’s or Klay Thompson’s touches relative to Durant’s or closing ranks around Golden State’s thin man as his reputation took blows for the first time in his NBA career. Not interested in shooting for 74 victories, the Warriors simply took care of business and stayed coiled for the postseason. Then it was a 16-1 dash to title No. 2, Durant snagging the Finals MVP trophy after the five-game dispatching of the Cavs. All of which just set the Warriors’ bar higher, requiring them to search for something new, somebody borrowed, presumably nothing blue. “This year it’s just survive and advance,” Kerr said. “It’s ‘let’s get to April, May, June in one piece.’ There’s a reason we’ve lost six home games already. We don’t have the driving force that we had the last few years. We’re dealing with what any team in NBA history that’s tried to do this has dealt with. The Lakers (1982-85), the Celtics (1984-87, 1957-66)... It’s just really hard and you need that driving force.” Said Warriors vet Andre Iguodala: “Your body is mindful of it, because it hurts.” A couple of young guys -- Patrick McCaw, Kevon Looney -- have taken on bigger roles. Nick Young brings some sort of buzz into any locker room that will have him. Still, as veteran guard Shaun Livingston said: “We’re not chasing any records. We’re not adding another All Star. We’re just trying to make it through the marathon.” Cavs' challenges mount during 2017-18 The Cavaliers are just trying to make it through the marathon, too. But if they could, they might do it like Rosie Ruiz, the 1980 women’s “winner” of the Boston Marathon who perpetrated a hoax by hopping the subway and running only the final mile of Beantown’s famous race. The 2017-18 has been anything but fun for Cleveland so far. It began with the departure of All-Star point guard Kyrie Irving, a not-so-funhouse mirror image of Durant’s arrival a year earlier in the Bay Area. Irving, for reasons still not quite explained, made it known in the offseason that he wanted out. He wanted to be the man on his own team. Or he didn’t want to be left in the lurch if (when?) LeBron James took his talents elsewhere again. Or both. Or neither. Regardless, once the Cavaliers made his request come true by dealing him to Boston for All-Star point guard Isaiah Thomas and Brooklyn’s coveted first-round pick this June, their task got tougher and their season longer. Losing one of the league’s best ball handlers and shot makers doesn’t qualify as “renewal” any more than what went on in Oklahoma City when Durant packed up. There’s been more. Shooting guard J.R. Smith seemingly got old overnight. Jae Crowder, who came from the Celtics in the Irving deal, hasn’t meshed with the Cavs’ style. Kevin Love has been moved to center but hasn’t done anything to satisfy the Cavs’ need for rim protection. Thomas only returned to action from a hip injury as the calendar turned to 2018 and has played only four games in these two weeks. Even with so many new faces -- seven of the top 12 in coach Tyronn Lue’s rotation weren’t here 12 months ago -- it’s a group heavy on veterans, players a little too established or mature to naturally instill raw energy. James said recently that none of this is new, it’s another case of the Cavs biding their time for the “second” season that means everything. But Lue also introduced the topic of “agendas,” suggesting that some of his guys were looking out for their own responsibilities and performances -- particularly on defense -- rather than the group’s. At best, this is another dose of the midseason blahs, the Cavs in their doldrums in need of an All-Star break. At worst, though, they might be honing some bad habits that won’t be so easy to break in May or June. Especially if East rivals such as Toronto, Boston or Washington are emboldened after witnessing or administering some of the Cavs’ more embarrassing beat downs this season. Will any of this matter come spring? It will if the switch each team is minding stubbornly decides not to flip. “That’s the key. You’ve got to find that balance,” Kerr said. “Are you flipping the switch or are you navigating? The idea is, don’t let bad habits slip in. Right now, this moment, we’re into some bad habits. Our defensive efforts  the last five, six games [before the weekend] were awful. We got away with it because Steph was going nuts.” The Cavaliers repeatedly have not gotten away with bad defensive habits, even on nights when James has been dominant. “It’s tough,” Livingston said. “They’re a team that’s built for the playoffs. But our core guys still are in there prime. Their core guys are still good. But we’re talking about ‘prime.’” Most still would pick both Golden State and Cleveland to advance all the way to a “Finals Four” (after last year’s “Rubber Match” series). But one of these years, most will be wrong -- about one or both. That alone might be motivation enough. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 15th, 2018

It took literally a minute to book Askren versus Aoki superfight

On Friday night, fans at the Singapore Indoor Stadium will have the fortune of witnessing two legends in the sport of mixed martial arts collide when Ben Askren meets Shinya Aoki for the ONE welterweight world championship.  At 17-0 in his professional career and with two lengthy world championship runs under his belt, Askren will be taking to the cage one last time.  Standing opposite him will be former long-time ONE lightweight world champion Aoki, who's already considered a legend in the sport because of his deadly submission skills.  This is a superfight in every sense of the world.  A fight of this magnitude, one would assume, would have taken weeks, probably even months to book, given that they both represent EVOLVE MMA, and that Aoki would have to move up in weight, right?  Not quite.  According to ONE Championship chairman and CEO Chatri Sityodtong, the Askren-Aoki superfight was booked in 'literally a minute'.  "You know how long it took me to get this fight together? It took me literally one minute." Sityodtong told the media present at the ONE: Immortal Pursuit pre-fight press conference at the Marina Bay Sands.  "I was messaging Ben, Ben said ‘Chatri, I want to have my retirement bout.’ I was like ‘Wow, really?’" Sityodtong continued, saying that Askren wanted 'the biggest name possible'. When offered to fight Aoki, Askren's response was quick and simple.  "Yeah, let’s do it." As for Aoki's side, accepting to fight Askren was easy as well, said Sityodtong.  For the ONE boss, this was a perfect example of the true spirit of martial arts. No need for trash talk, no need for drama. It was simply two warriors wanting to test themselves against each other.  "This is martial arts, right? It’s not about beating each other up, these guys wanted to prove to themselves that their life journey of being martial artists, they wanted to be the best versions of themselves, and they wanna test themselves against the best." Friday night, MMA fans in Singapore and all over the world will get to see two of the best ever, test themselves against each other.    Legends collide as Ben Askren defends his ONE welterweight championship against former ONE lightweight champion Shinya Aoki at ONE: Immortal Pursuit.  Catch the exciting MMA action LIVE on Friday, November 24th, 8:30 PM on S+A channel 23!   .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 22nd, 2017

WATCH: Jimuel Pacquiao drops opponent in first amateur bout

The apple doesn't fall far from the tree, so they say.  While eight-division boxing world champion and current reigning WBA (Regular) Welterweight World Champion Manny "Pacman" Pacquiao may be at the tail end of his long and storied boxing career, it looks like the next generation Pacquiao is getting ready to carry on the legacy.  Manny's eldest son, Emmanuel Jr., or Jimuel is already into the sweet science, and over the weekend, showed off a tiny bit of what he can do inside the squared circle.  Taking on schoolmate Lucas Carson in a two-round sparring session, Jimuel - who showcased the aggression of a young Pacman - dropped his opponent, much to the delight of Team Pacquiao, who was in attendance.        View this post on Instagram                   Emmanuel ‘Jimuel’ Pacquiao Jr aggressive in Rd 1 knocks down opponent schoolmate Lucas Carson . It was an action packed bout of just 2 rounds with entire team Pacquiao supporting Jimuel who dreams to represent Phils in the future . #itsintheblood #boxing A post shared by Dyan Castillejo (@dyancastillejo) on Feb 8, 2019 at 10:34pm PST Obviously, Jimuel has a long way to go, but if this is any indication of the kid's potential, then it looks like the boxing world will have another Pacquiao to look forward to.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 11th, 2019

UAAP Season 81: Ang nagpabalik ng korona sa Espana -- Rondina on her legacy

Graduating Sisi Rondina would like to be remembered by fans, especially by the true University of Sto. Tomas supporters, for just one thing. “Ang nagpabalik ng korona sa Espana,” Rondina’s bold statement heading into another action-packed and exciting UAAP Season 81 women’s volleyball tournament set to open on February 16. The Cebuana hotshot has been lording it over in the beach volleyball tournament, snaring four championships in her five years of service for UST on the sand highlighted by a three-peat this season. Rondina may have enjoyed success in beach volleyball, but the passionate Tigress has yet to bite a mint in the indoor event – the only missing crown in her colorful career. Now in her last dance for the black and gold, Rondina vowed to leave a winning legacy.      “’Yun ang gusto ko, always naman eh, first year pa lang ako. Siyempre ang tagal ng hindi nag-cha-champion ang UST. Goal namin ang maibalik ang korona,” the team captain said. Last season, Rondina averaged a season-best 21.1 points per game with 38.44% success rate in attacks and three digs per frame. Unfortunately, a series of injuries, inconsistency and lack of on-court support for Rondina doomed UST to its worst finish in the Final Four era. The Espana-based squad tallied a disappointing 4-10 win-loss record at seventh place.            'Please cooperate' Rondina knows that UST will need total team effort to win a championship and end a nine-year title drought so the very vocal leader wants just one thing from her teammates. “Before sabihin sa akin ni coach na ako ang captain ball sinabi ko sa kanila na, ‘Please cooperate. If may sasabihin kayo sa akin feel free to approach me. Puwede kayong maglabas ng sama ng loob. Anything. Basta ang gusto ko lang maayos ko kayo and sana ‘yung gusto kong mangyari ay may ganoon din kayong attitude,’” she said. “Kasi siyempre gusto ko rin na ‘yung willingness (na manalo) talaga sa team siyempre hindi yun mabubuo sa sarili namin kung wala kaming ganoon. Sana magsimula sa sarili namin and sana nga mag-cooperate ang mga bata. Kasi mga bata kami ngayon eh. More on rookies.” After singlehandedly carrying UST’s campaign last year, Rondina is expected to get all the help she needs with the return of Milena Alessandrini, who was named Rookie of the Year last season despite missing a couple of games because of a shoulder injury, Dimdim Pacres, Caitlyn Viray, Alina Bicar and Rica Rivera and the arrival of prized rookie Eya Laure.    “Sabi ko sa kanila na, ‘Hindi ko na kayo papakialam sa labas basta sa loob (ng court) mag-perform lang kayo ng maayos. I-commit nyo ang self nyo sa kung saan kayo naka-commit,’” added Rondina. For her part, Rondina promises to play with the same heart and passion she has been displaying all these years while donning the UST jersey. “Same pa rin po na igi-give ang best at masasabi ko na mas igi-give ko pa ang best ko in my final roar for UST,” she said. “Mindset ko talaga ngayon ‘yung gusto naming mangyari (na mag-champion). Everybody wants naman talaga ‘yun. Sa amin sana makuha namin.”   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 9th, 2019

UAAP Season 81: Ayokong makilala ng tao na kapatid lang ni Ate EJ -- Eya Laure

Celebrated rookie Eya Laure hopes to make waves in the collegiate ranks and prove her worth as part of University of Sto. Tomas’ volleyball team. A multi-awarded player in high school, she is determined to make her own mark and step out of the shadows of her sister EJ and her father, former PBA player Eddie Laure come the UAAP Season 81 women’s volleyball tournament. “Super excited kasi syempre ayoko rin naman makilala ng tao as kapatid lang ni Ate EJ or anak ni Daddy ganyan,” said the former UAAP girl's volleyball Most Valuable Player. “Gusto ko rin naman makilala kahit papano ng tao kung ano talaga kayang gawin ng isang Eya Laure and ma-perform,” said Laure, a versatile player who has collected recognitions both as a setter and a wing spiker. “Siyempre, ayokong andun lang ako sa shadow nilang dalawa.” Arguably, this season’s finest recruit, Laure gave a glimpse of what she can offer on the table during the pre-season including helping the Tigresses capture the UniGames crown.       A feisty competitor, passionate with high volleyball IQ and undeniable charisma, Laure could complement another fierce Tigress in Sisi Rondina, who is hoping to leave a winning legacy in her swan song. With Eya Laure on board to help Rondina and last year’s Rookie of the Year Milena Alessandrini on offense, the season looks bright for UST to end a nine-year title drought.     “Ako naman siguro it's an honor na rin na maglalaro ako for UST and matutulungan ko yung seniors team din, gagawin ko talaga yung best ko na matulungan sila every game,” she said. Laure is a favorite among fans and pundits but is quick to deflect the tag as a shoo-in for the Rookie of the Year award – the recognition her sister EJ captured back in Season 77. “Ewan ko ha. Hindi ko siya priority talaga eh, I mean ‘yung pagiging Rookie of the Year big deal siguro sa ibang tao pero sa akin,” said Laure. “Hindi kasi siya ganun ka big deal (sa akin) kasi more on andun kasi ako sa bigger picture, na mas madaming matutuwa kung mag-champion kami or magka-place kami this year. ‘Yun ang mas okay sa akin, sa kung saan mas maraming masaya, hindi yung ako lang ang masaya.” Unfortunately, the much-awaited team up of the Laure sisters won’t materialize this year as EJ skipped action for the second straight season following a long layoff after suffering a shoulder injury two years ago.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 9th, 2019

PBA: Classic rivalry games on deck for February

PBA basketball will continue even as the league takes a break in mid February to give way for Gilas Pilipinas. A pair of classic games will be played at the Big Dome on February 17 as San Miguel, Alaska, Purefoods, and Ginebra are all set to field a collection of All-Stars from the yesteryears. Four-time PBA MVP Alvin Patrimonio returns to action for Purefoods as they take on ‘90s rival Alaska led by Johnny Abarrientos. Powerhouse San Miguel will have players like Benjie Paras, Danny Ildefonso, and Allan Caidic to go up against Ginebra’s Bal David, Eric Menk, and head coach Sonny Jaworski. The pair of games is organized by the Samahan ng mga Dating Propesyonal na Basketbolista ng Pilipinas (SDPBP) in partnership with the PBA for the benefit of the player’s union. Here are the complete lineups for all four teams: PUREFOODS # 1 Bong Ravena # 3 Bonel Balingit  # 4 Paul Artadi  # 5 Ronnie Magsanoc # 7 Rey Evangelista # 8 Al Solis # 9 Elmer Cabahug # 10 Dindo Pumaren # 12 Glen Capacio # 13 Roger Yap # 16 Alvin Patrimonio # 19 Joey Sta. Maria # 31 Peter Naron # 44 Jerry Codiñera # 55 Richard Yee Coach: Ramon Fernandez ALASKA # 6 Jojo Lastimosa # 7 Roehl Gomez # 9 Rodney Santos # 11 Willie Miller # 11 Eddie Laure # 14 Johnny Abarrientos # 16 Bong Hawkins # 19 Kenneth Duremdes # 22 Jeff Cariaso # 32 Poch Juinio # 33 Bogs Adornado - Captain # 34 Wesley Gonzales # 35 Tony de la Cruz # 55 John Ferriols Earvin Sotto Coaches: Joel Banal/Aric del Rosario SAN MIGUEL # 2 Denok Miranda # 6 Ato Agustin # 8 Allan Caidic # 10 Alvin Teng # 10 Danny Ildefonso # 11 Nelson Asaytono # 11 Biboy Ravanes # 17 Olsen Racela  # 18 Art de la Cruz # 22 Arnold Gamboa # 23 Bong Alvarez # 25 Freddie Abuda # 25 Dondon Hontiveros # 42 Danny Seigle # 88 Chris Calaguio # 14 Benjie Paras Coach: Norman Black GINEBRA # 1 Bal David # 6 Noli Locsin # 8 Bennet Palad # 9 Leo Isaac # 11 JV Gayoso # 12 Vince Hizon # 13 Marlou Aquino # 16 Benny Cheng # 17 Rudy Distrito # 18 Wilmer Ong # 22 Romulo Mamaril # 25 Pido Jarencio # 30 Eric Menk # 32 EJ Feihl # 33 Bobby Jose Coach: Robert Jaworski   — Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 31st, 2019

UAAP Season 81: Arado, Mendrez lead U-23 hopefuls

Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc. has formally extended its invitation to all UAAP schools to allow their girls’ and women’s volleyball players to try out for the national pool. University of the East athletic director Rod Roque, also the UAAP representative to the LVPI, distributed the invitation letters to members of the UAAP Board during their meeting Tuesday.   “Sa akin pinadaan ni Mr. Ariel Paredes (LVPI SecGen) and tamang-tamang may UAAP Board meeting kami. So i-disseminate ko na sa kanila ‘yung info na open ang tryout for Under 23.” LVPI earlier this month announced a two-day tryout on January 24-25 at the Arellano University Gym in Taft Ave for the purpose of expanding the national pool that will see action in a number of international tournaments including the Asian Women’s U-23 Volleyball Championship in Hanoi, Vietnam on July 13 to 21. Leading the list of hopefuls are Lady Warriors Kat Arado and Me-Anne Mendrez, who both represented the country in the 2016 Asian Women’s U-19 Volleyball Championship in Nakhon Ratchasima, Thailand back. The PHI finished 10th in the 15-nation field.      “Dito sa akin number one na very, very qualified si Kat Arado,” said Roque, who will accompany his players in the tryout. Arado was also invited in the seniors national team tryout last year.   “Kasi siya lang ‘yung nag-decline last year kasi ‘yung studies niya tapos may Generika, may UE siya sabi niya ‘sir hindi ko na kaya’. So nag-back out muna siya sa national team but this year tapos na ‘yung Generika nila tapos last playing year niya sa UAAP sabi niya sa akin, ‘sir ready na ko sa national team,’” Roque said. “So dadalhin ko siya sa 25 tapos si Me-Anne Mendrez. Silang dalawa kasi silang dalawa ang pinaka-qualified.” LVPI hopes to see other young talents like Cocolife's Kalei Mau, DLSU-Zobel's Angel Canino, University of Sto. Tomas' Milena Alessandrini and Eya Laure, Faith Nisperos and Alyssa Solomon on National U, University of the Philippines' Tots Carlos, and Air Force's Dell Palomata in the two-day tryouts. The federation has also extended invitations to the Philippine Superliga, Premier Volleyball League and the NCAA.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 15th, 2019

UAAP Season 81: UAAP Board looking to switch to FIVB individual awards format

The UAAP Board is highly considering changing its volleyball individual awards format into the FIVB standards in Season 81. Board member Rod Roque revealed that the change in the awarding format will be one of the main topics that the Board will tackle when they convene on Tuesday and Wednesday. Roque is optimistic that the change will be implemented this season. “Well, isa ‘yan sa napag-usapan naming innovations sa volleyball. Sabi namin susundan namin ‘yung international (standard) kasi by position ang international e,” said the UE athletic director. “So we might do it this year. So depende tomorrow kung ma-approve namin ‘yun then we will implement right away kasi mas marami kang mabibigyan kung position e. Pabor sa players mas maganda,” added Roque, who is also the representative of the UAAP in the Larong Volleyball sa Pilipinas, Inc. For the longest time, the UAAP has been feting players by skills: scorer, attacker, blocker, server, setter, digger and receiver as well as the Most Valuable Player. Other local leagues like the NCAA, Philippine Superliga and Premier Volleyball League and UAAP high school have already adapted the FIVB’s by positon individual awards of best two outside hitters, two middle blockers, an opposite hitter, setter, libero and the MVP. “Kami sa eligibility kasi kami ‘yung naga-update ng rules and regulations,” he said. “Sabi namin we follow the international kasi we’re using the international (rules and format) in all sporting events. We might as well do also for the awarding di ba?” Roque is optimistic that the change will be approved as other schools also showed positive response during their previous meetings. “Favorable naman yung response ng walong schools kasi mas maraming mabibigyan ng award e so I think ma-approve ‘yun,” he said. Roque said that it has been on the table years. “Alam mo na ‘yung tradition, tradition we keep on following the tradition, tradition,” sad Roque. “Well hi-tech dapat sumusunod tayo sa panahon, sa trend and that is the trend now we might as well do what is right.”     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 14th, 2019

UAAP Season 81: NU willing to be patient this time

National University’s management has learned the hard way that it takes years to mold and develop a women’s volleyball team that would yield the results they wanted. The Lady Bulldogs for the past six years gambled with coaching changes that saw the squad play under five different mentors. Yet the outcome were the same: NU season after season came away empty-handed in the UAAP.     When NU approached Norman Miguel and laid out a long-term program, the Lady Bulldogs seemed to be looking at the right direction this time. “Well, actually, when the sports director approached me, nu’ng in-explain niya sa akin ‘yung parang long-term program doon parang medyo na-open ‘yung mind ko na it’s very challenging pero why not accept it,” said Miguel, who was took the reins after former coach Babes Castillo parted ways with NU. Castillo handled the Lady Bulldogs last year as a replacement for Roger Gorayeb, who was with the team for two seasons and a half. Under Castillo, NU made a strong run in the first round of UAAP Season 80 after winning six of their first seven games in 6-foot-5 star Jaja Santiago’s swan song. But their campaign turned sour as the squad managed to win only one game in the second round to land at no. 4 seed in the Final Four and eventually bowed down to grand slam champion De La Salle University.    Overall, NU saw its women’s team switch hands from one coach to another. Francis Vicente steered the Lady Bulldogs to a Final Four stint in Season 75 but received the boot the following year and was replaced by Edjet Mabbayad, whose short stint will be always be remembered as Ateneo de Manila University’s second to the last step before claiming its breakthrough title in Season 76. Dong Dela Cruz took over Mabbayad’s position in Season 77 but was replaced by Gorayeb halfway into the season. Gorayeb left the Lady Bulldogs after NU failed to reach the semis for two straight years. “Alam naman nating lahat na ‘yung NU women’s parang looking forward to you know bag a title sa UAAP kasi hanggang ngayon medyo wala pa talaga,” said Miguel, who handled DLSU’s men’s team last season. “So parang ‘yun yung pumasok sa mind ko na malaking challenge siya pero masarap trabahuhin di ba?” he added. However, Miguel will have a young roster to work with. Rookies Princess Robles, Joyme Cagande, Ivy Lacsina and Jennifer Nierva show a lot of promise. Holdovers Roselyn Doria, Risa Sato and Audrey Paran will return while Rica Diolan is back in the fold after skipping two seasons. Miguel said that the NU management set a realistic goal this season, just one step at a time.     “Naniwala ako doon sa gusto nilang mangyari not this year, probably next year or at the third year parang ganun na kailangan na meron nang mangyari (championship),” he said. There’s no short cut to success and NU this time is willing to take a long drive to the promised land.   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsJan 13th, 2019

UAAP Season 81: EJ Laure’s return still up in the air

More than a year after sustaining a shoulder injury that prevented her from suiting up for the University of Sto. Tomas in UAAP Season 80, EJ Laure’s return with the Tigresses remains up in the air. Head coach Kungfu Reyes told reporters that the open spiker is still with the Espana-based squad, but she will need to work doubly hard to regain her spot on the team.  For her first step back to being a Tigress, Laure must show up on Thursday for UST’s first training day after their long break.   “Visible naman (siya). Nag-exam nitong nakaraan pero ‘yung pagbalik after ng Christmas break ang pinakaimportante sa December 27, nandun na dapat siya,” said Reyes. But of course, the mentor would want to see Laure back in good form as they prepare for Season 81. “So hopefully makikita niyo na siya ulit in action kung makaabot siya sa cut,” said Reyes. The Season 77 Rookie of the Year last saw action last year but sustained a right shoulder injury months before Season 80. Without one of the Tigresses’ top hitter, UST struggled in its campaign and finished with a 4-10 win-loss slate. UST faithful are hopeful for Laure’s return this season especially with Sisi Rondina playing in her last year and sister Eya Laure suiting up for her rookie season. “Si Ate andun naman siya. Process pa rin siya. Siyempre di naman kailangan madaliin meron talagang time kung panahon mo, panahon mo,” said Eya.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 26th, 2018

THROWBACK: Top PBA rookie draft picks through the years

After 33 years, the tradition of PBA teams selecting promising players from the amateur ranks, patterned after the NBA draft process, heralded a balanced influx of talent to even out the league’s competitiveness. But what makes the draft process interesting is the choice of the number 1 pick, who is considered the most in-demand player seen to bolster the chances of the worst performing or a newly established team in the PBA. With Columbian Dyip’s selection of Lyceum stalwart CJ Perez as the number one pick in the 2018 PBA Draft,  let’s look back at the top draft picks through the years, from its beginnings in 1985 to the controversial selection last year, and how they made their mark in the league. 1985 – Sonny Cabatu Sonny Cabatu was the PBA’s first-ever number one draft pick, selected by the expansion club Shell Azodrin Bugbusters, which took over the Crispa Redmanizers franchise. An intense bruiser inside the paint, Cabatu was Shell’s starting center known as “Mr. Quality Minutes.” He would then play for Great Taste, Purefoods, Sarsi, and Ginebra in a respectable career. 1986 – Rey Cuenco A member of the guest Northern Cement Corp. (NCC) team coached by Ron Jacobs that played in the pro league’s 1984 season, Rey Cuenco was picked in the 1986 draft by another new, expansion ballclub Alaska Milkmen to lead their charge.  His pro playing career blossomed from 1989 to 1992 under the tutelage of Ginebra playing coach Robert Jaworski. In 1990, he was adjudged the Most Improved Player and part of the Mythical Second Team. He also became a member of the Big J-coached, first all-Filipino, all-professional “Dream Team” in the 1990 Asian Games in Beijing that won a silver medal for the country with Allan Caidic, Samboy Lim, Benjie Paras and Ramon Fernandez among others. 1987 – Allan Caidic Considered the greatest Filipino basketball marksman ever, Allan Caidic was already a big name before he strutted into the PBA. Having won titles for the UE Red Warriors and among the top players of the Ron Jacobs-mentored national team, the Triggerman was definitely one big prized addition for any team. And Great Taste, having the privilege of selecting first in 1987, made Caidic a hands-down choice. He would later suit up for San Miguel Beer and Ginebra San Miguel in a storied career. He had since become a PBA Hall of Famer and among the Top 25 Greatest Players of All Time. 1988 – Jack Tanuan A vital cog of the FEU Tamaraws and a member of the 1986 Seoul Asian Games squad that took home the bronze, Jack Tanuan was a feared scorer who made a living with his inside game. It was no surprise that new franchise Purefoods selected him as their top pick in 1988, in addition to other direct hires from the amateur ranks that formed their strong core—Alvin Patrimonio, Jerry Codinera, Jojo Lastimosa and Glenn Capacio—on top of having the Franchise, Mon Fernandez, as playing coach. He would later play for the Sarsi, Swift and Pop Cola teams under the RFM franchise, and later on for Sta. Lucia, Mobiline, and Alaska. 1989 – Benjie Paras It was the year of Benjie Paras, a valiant, hardworking center called “The Tower of Power,” who led the UP Maroons to its historic 1986 UAAP title. After being selected by Shell as the number one pick in the 1989 draft, Paras would achieve the impossible of being both the league MVP and Rookie of the Year, while being named to the Mythical Five. Paras along with fellow Hall of Famers Ronnie Magsanoc and long-time import Bobby Ray Parks Sr. became the triumvirate that led Shell to the First Conference championships in 1990 and 1992. And, even with the onset of Fil-foreign players in the PBA, Paras remained dominant and won his second MVP plum in 1999. 1990 – Peter Jao Peter Jao was the first Cebuano player to be drafted as a rookie top pick in the league, selected by Presto Tivoli. He would then become a member of Presto’s champion team in the 1990 All-Filipino conference with Allan Caidic and Gerry Esplana. 1991 – Alex Araneta The former Ateneo Blue Eagle suited up for Alaska Air Force/Milkmen until 1995, after which he was hired in the company as a management trainee, eventually becoming one of Alaska Milk Corp.’s sales managers. Of Alaska’s 14 championships in the league, Araneta was a veteran of 2 of them (1991 Third Conference and 1994 Governors’ Cup). 1992 – Vergel Meneses An ex-seminarian who became among the PBA’s Top 40 Greatest Players, the “Aerial Voyager” was known for his show-stopping moves and is considered among the best one-on-one players. The former JRU Heavy Bomber and 1995 PBA MVP was also a member of the all-pro Centennial Team coached by Tim Cone that won the William Jones Cup in Taipei and placed 3rd in the 1998 Asian Games in Bangkok. 1993 – Zandro Limpot After his years as a King Archer for De La Salle, Zandro Limpot entered the 1993 draft and was chosen first overall by the expansion ballclub Sta. Lucia Realtors.  Limpot was named Rookie Of The Year that season as well as reaping All-Star, Mythical Second Team and All-Defensive Team honors. Limpot won his first and only PBA championship (2006 Philippine Cup) with the Purefoods Chunkee Giants. 1994 – Noli Locsin Another former Green Archer, Noli Locsin was picked by Tondeña 65 as the league’s top draft pick in 1994. He became a 4-time PBA All-Star (1994, 1995, 1996, 1999) in a high-flying career with Ginebra. Bacolod-born Locsin was famous for his barrelling game before the arrival of Filipino-Americans in the PBA. Spent 6 seasons with the Ginebra San Miguel franchise; won the 1997 Commissioner’s Cup with Jaworski as coach. He later suited up for Pop Cola, Tanduay, Red Bull, Talk ‘N Text and Sta. Lucia. 1995 – Dennis Espino After leading the UST Growling Tigers to their monumental four-peat, Dennis Espino would later bring his winning ways to the PBA. Sta. Lucia got the first crack at the 1995 draft and picked him first overall to form a menacing one-two punch with Zandro Limpot, and later with Marlou Aquino. He had a sterling career with Sta. Lucia for 15 years and yielded the following achievements:  4-time PBA All-Star, 2-time All-Defensive Team, 2-time Mythical First Team, 2004-05 Defensive Player of the Year and 2007-08 Philippine Cup Finals MVP. He won the 2001 Governors’ Cup and the 2007-08 Philippine Cup for Sta. Lucia. 1996 – Marlou Aquino Picked by Gordon’s Gin as first overall in the 1996 draft, Marlou Aquino had an exceptional maiden year gave him Rookie of the Year, Defensive Player of the Year, Best Player of the Conference (1996 Governors’ Cup), Mythical First Team, All-Star and All-Defensive Team honors. He also became the second Ginebra player (after Dondon Ampalayo in 1986) to win the Rookie of the Year award.  Aquino then was part of Gordon Gin’s 1997 Commissioner’s Cup and Sta. Lucia Realty’s 2001 Governors’ Cup championship teams.  1997 – Andy Seigle The first Fil-Am top pick, chosen by Mobiline in 1997, Andy Seigle won Rookie of the Year and was part of the 1999 All-Star Game. The Scranton, Pennsylvania native was twice a member of the National Team in the 1998 and 2002 Asian Games and was one of the most dominant and best defensive players in the 1990’s era. 1998 – Danny Ildefonso  Danny Ildefonso was picked by San Miguel Beer first overall in 1998, the year he also won Rookie of the Year. One of only four pro players to win back-to-back MVP awards (2000 and 2001), Ildefonso had a prolific 15-year career with the San Miguel ballclub with 8 championships (1999 and 2000 Commissioner’s Cups;  1999, 2000 and 2011 Governors’ Cups; 2001 All-Filipino; 2005 and 2009 Fiesta Cups). He is among the PBA’s Top 40 Greatest Players. 1999 – Sonny Alvarado Selected by Tanduay as its top pick in the 1999 Draft, Sonny Alvarado was poised to dominate the league as a gritty Fil-Am all-around player. He was however embroiled in the “Fil-Sham” controversy, that revealed that he had filed two alleged birth certificates of his mother when he applied for the draft. This prompted immigration officials to initiate deportation measures against Alvarado because of such failure to directly prove his Filipino parental links. 2000 – Paolo Mendoza Paolo Mendoza was a hot-shooting guard who led the UP Fighting Maroons to two Final Four appearances from 1996-1997. He then applied for the 2000 draft and was chosen the overall first pick by Sta. Lucia Realty. Together with Dennis Espino and Marlou Aquino, Mendoza was one of the main factors behind the 2001 Governor’s Cup title win of the Realtors. 2001 – Willie Miller The diminutive Willie Miller is considered the first player from the PBA’s rival league, Metropolitan Basketball Association, to become the top overall pick in a PBA Rookie Draft, in which he was selected by the Batang Red Bull Thunder. He was part of three teams that copped PBA titles—Red Bull (2001 and 2002 Commissioner’s Cup), Alaska (2007 Fiesta Cup), and Talk ‘N Text (2015 Commissioner’s Cup). His career highlights in his 15 years in the PBA were 2-time MVP (2002 and 2007), 2-time Finals MVP, 9-time All-Star,  3-time Mythical First Team member, and 2014 Sportsmanship Awardee. 2002 – Yancy de Ocampo The “Post-Man” as he is called, Yancy de Ocampo is a shifty, reliable center who delivers the goods at crunch time. He was the number one draft pick in 2002 by the FedEx Express. He was part of several champion teams, namely Talk ‘N Text, BMeg Llamados, San Mig Coffee and eventually San Miguel Beer. 2003 – Mike Cortez The “Cool Cat” Mike Cortez, a former La Salle standout, brought his court savviness to the PBA after Alaska picked him first overall in the 2003 draft by and immediately went to work. Cortez helped the Aces win the Reinforced Conference that year. He would then move on to San Miguel Beer, and was part of a hefty push to win the 2007 and 2009 Fiesta Conferences. A journeyman in his 15-year PNA career, Cortez currently plays for the Blackwater Elite. 2004 – Rich Alvarez The Japan-born and U.S.-raised Rich Alvarez had a blast on his maiden year with Shell, which selected him first overall in the 2004 draft, collecting Rookie of the Year, All-Star, All-Defensive Team and All-Rookie Team honors. Played for 13 seasons in 8 different teams, Rich was successful in winning 4 championships with the TNT Tropang Texters (2010-11, 2011-12, 2012-13 Philippine Cups and 2011 Commissioner’s Cup) 2005 – Anthony "Jay" Washington This Zambales-born journeyman was first chosen by Air21 in the 2005 draft then traded to Talk ‘N Text. But his stint with San Miguel Beer made him flourish with two titles in the 2009 Fiesta Conference and the 2011 Governors Cup. He would return to the TNT Tropang Texters and help the, win the 2015 Commissioner’s Cup. He currently plays for the Rain or Shine Elastopainters. 2006 – Kelly Williams Picked first overall by Sta. Lucia Realty in 2006, Kelly Williams immediately made his presence felt that year bagging Rookie of the Year and All-Rookie Team honors. He first won a championship with Sta. Lucia in the 2007-08 Philippine Cup and would then lead his present ballclub, the TNT Tropang Texters to five championships, notably the three-peat Philippine Cups from 2010 to 2012, and the 2011 and 2015 Commissioners’ Cups. 2007 – Joe Devance While it was Welcoat that originally drafted Joe Devance as the first pick overall in the 2007 draft, he would earn the distinction of being the league’s winningest coach Tim Cone’s most trusted trooper. Devance has won nine championships with Cone as his coach, starting with Alaska (2010 Fiesta Cup), B-Meg/San Mig Coffee (2012 and 2014 Commissioner’s Cup, 2013 and 2014 Governors’ Cup and Philippine Cup); and currently, Ginebra San Miguel (2016 and 2017 Governors’ Cup, and 2018 Commissioners’ Cup).  2008 – Gabe Norwood Chosen by the only team has played for up to now, the Rain or Shine Elastopainters, as its number one draft pick in 2008, Gabe Norwood would then etch a rich career with his ballclub, having won 2 championships (2012 Governors’ Cup, 2016 Commissioner’s Cup). He had also notched numerous awards, including Rookie of the Year, Defensive Player of the Year, and was part of the All Star Game nine times, and the All-Defensive Team six times.  2009 – Japeth Aguilar   “Jumpin’ Japeth” starred for the Ateneo Blue Eagles for two years then moved to the Western Kentucky University Hilltoppers during his university years.  In 2009, Aguilar was selected by Burger King and only played one game with the Whoppers, after which he was traded to Talk `N Text.  Japeth has become a Team Gilas mainstay since the beginning of his pro career, of which the Philippines’ participation in the 2014 FIBA World Cup in Spain became one of his national team career highlights. 2010 – Nonoy Baclao   “Mr. Swat” was among the vital cogs of the Ateneo Blue Eagles’ back-to-back UAAP men’s basketball championships in 2008 and 2009. After college, Baclao led the Philippine Patriots as the inaugural champion of the 2009-10 Asean Basketball League (ABL) season prior to entering the PBA rookie draft. In 2010, Nonoy was selected by Air21 then he was traded to Petron (San Miguel) where he had one championship in his sophomore year in the league.  2011 – JVee Casio  The former De La Salle Green Archer playmaker who was Rookie of the Year (2003), Finals Co-MVP (2007) and Mythical Five member (2007 & 2008) in the UAAP was a Gilas pioneer before deciding to turn pro in 2011. By far Casio “G-Shock” is the shortest among the active PBA players to have been picked first overall by the Powerade Tigers. JVee was traded to Alaska Aces in 2012 and has since then became a mainstay in the team which he helped win the Commissioner’s Cup title in 2013. 2012 – June Mar Fajardo  The burly Cebuano was star center at the University of Cebu of which he steered to back-to-back titles in 2010 and 2011 at the CESAFI league. “The Kraken” has played for only one team throughout his pro career in the Asean Basketball League (ABL) and the PBA – San Miguel. As one big reason to “Fear the Beer,” Fajardo gave San Miguel six championships to date and became the first and only PBA player to win the MVP award in four straight seasons (2014, 2015, 2016, 2017).  2013 – Greg Slaughter  “GregZilla” stomped rivals with his huge presence when he helped lead the Ateneo Blue Eagles to two consecutive UAAP championships in 2011 and 2012 -- completing a five-peat for the Loyola Heights squad. Picked by Barangay Ginebra in 2013, Slaughter got his pro career to a fast start with ROY and All-Rookie Team honors. He won 3 championships under coach Tim Cone (2016 and 2017 Governors’ Cups; 2018 Commissioner’s Cup). He also saw action for the first time with Gilas this year in the 2019 FIBA World Cup Asian Qualifiers. 2014 – Stanley Pringle  Drafted by NorthPort Batang Pier, “The Beard” exploded into the local basketball scene with Rookie of the Year and All-Rookie team honors, after stints with Belgium, Poland, Ukraine and Indonesia ballclubs.  A 4-time All-Star (2015, 2016, 2017, 2018), Pringle is considered among the best guards and high scorers in the play-for-pay league, gaining raves from other coaches and close followers of the sport.   2015 – Moala Tautuaa  He applied and went undrafted in the 2012 NBA draft, then moved to Asia to resume his basketball career by playing as an import for the Westsports Malaysia Dragons in the ABL.  After which, the Fil-Tongan made the “Big Mo(ve)” to the Philippines and spent a fruitful season with the D-League, ending up as its 2015 Foundation Cup MVP.  Talk N` Text selected Tautuaa as overall pick of the first round but traded him later on to NorthPort Batang Pier in 2018. 2016 – Raphael Banal  Since the first round of the 2016 PBA draft was dedicated to PBA teams choosing Gilas Pilipinas players to join their ranks, the regular draft started in the second round. Here, the Blackwater Elite chose as its first pick Raphael Banal, a contemporary of Kiefer Ravena and Von Pessumal in the Ateneo Blue Eaglets juniors team who went to the Hope International University-California for college.  His surname rings a bell, being the youngest child of former PBA player and TNT coach (2003 All-Filipino Conference champion) Joel Banal.  Yet “Ael” held his own in the PBA D-League for two conferences with Racal Motors.  2017 – Christian Standhardinger  The American-schooled Fil-German played in the ProA and Basketball Bundesliga tournaments in Germany as well with Hong Kong Eastern in the ABL.  Although he was selected by San Miguel Beer in the overall draft of 2017 in a controversial trade with Kia Picanto, the rightful owner of the number one pick, Standhardinger joined the Beermen in the 2018 Commissioner’s Cup after completing his ABL tour of duty.  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 18th, 2018

NCAA Season 94 volleyball: CSB continues win streak, snaps San Beda’s romp

Klarisa Abriam played clutch in the closing stretch of the fourth set to star in College of St. Benilde’s come-from-behind 17-25, 25-22, 25-19, 29-27, win over the erstwhile unbeaten San Beda University in the NCAA Season 94 women’s volleyball tournament Monday at the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan.   The open hitter scored the Lady Blazers’ last three points of the game to hand CSB its fourth straight win for a 4-1 record while putting a stop on the Lady Red Spikers’ 5-game romp. Abriam scored all but one of her game-high 19 points off attacks while adding 17 digs for CSB. Rookie Michelle Gamit and Maritess Pablo scored 12 each while Jan Daguil had seven markers for the Lady Blazers. “Very big siyempre (ang panalo). If everything goes as planned at least hanggang rank no. 2 ka na. Better ‘yun kaysa sa three or sa four ka magsisimula kung papasok ka (sa Final Four),” said CSB coach Jerry Yee, whose squad will go on a long holiday break before marching back into action on January 4 against Lyceum of the Philippines University. “Every game counts dito, one round lang, mabilis eh. So a’yun nakapakaimportante.” Turning the tables around after recovering from a sluggish first set, the Lady Blazers were able to control the fourth set with an 8-3 blitz for a 20-15 lead. But San Beda behind the efforts of Nieza and Jiezela Viray rallied the Lady Red Spikers in a scorching counterattack to take the lead, 21-20. It was a tight race to the finish for both squads before Gamit put CSB at match point, 24-23, off a soft tip. San Beda made a last stand saving four match points including a crosscourt hit by skipper Cesca Racraquin that tied the frame at 27. Abriam broke the Lady Red Spikers’ defensive wall in the next play before sealing the win with a dink off San Beda overreceive. Jeziela Viray led the Lady Red Spikers with 16 points while Nieza Viray and Racraquin had 13 markers each. Meanwhile, the Blazers swept the Red Spikers, 25-21, 25-21, 25-19, in men’s play. Georgie Juani finished with 14 points, Joshua De Sequera got 12 while Francis Basilan and Roneiy Adviento posted 10 each for CSB, which improved to 4-1 card. San Beda fell to 1-5 mark. In juniors division, CSB-La Salle Greenhills beat San Beda, 22-25, 21-25, 25-18, 26-24, 20-18.     The Greenies improved to 2-3 card while the Red Cubs dropped to 3-3.   ---     Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 17th, 2018

Foregoing PBA Draft all worth it for UAAP 81 Finals-bound Desiderio

Paul Desiderio is playing his last year for the University of the Philippines in the UAAP Season 81 Men’s Basketball Tournament. A year from now, the top gun of the Fighting Maroons may very well be seeing action in the PBA – as a surefire first round draft pick, no less. That’s not happening just yet, however, as Desiderio has led State U into the Finals with games scheduled for December 1 and December 5 as well as December 8, if necessary. The deadline for applications in the 2018 PBA Draft? December 3. “Wala. ‘Di aabot,” he candidly told reporters after shooting his squad over Adamson on Wednesday and into the championship round. Desiderio isn’t sweating at all, however, as he has no regrets in leading UP in continuing to make history. “Actually, gusto ko nan gang magpa-draft kaso ‘di ako aabot sa deadline,” he said. He then continued, “Okay na okay lang din naman kasi ang tagal-tagal na ‘tong inantay ng UP community.” After all, sacrifice has been the signature of the Fighting Maroons in the season – sacrifice best encapsulated by their new mantra of “16 Strong.” Of course, it was the skipper himself who came up with the mantra. “Sobrang proud ako sa ginawa naming ’16 Strong.’ Ako talaga, sinacrifice ko lahat, pero para sa UP lahat ng sakripisyong ‘to,” he shared. Indeed, throughout the tournament, Desiderio has allowed Nigerian transferee Bright Akhuetie and second-year stud Juan Gomez de Liano to shine under the spotlight. And yet, whenever it matters most for the Fighting Maroons, it’s their graduating captain who has the ball. That’s the way it should be for Desiderio who will live on in history as the player who guaranteed all of this for State U. What did he say then? “Atin ‘to, papasok ‘to.” --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 28th, 2018

& lsquo;Saxophone Idols Live in Action& rsquo; at Music Museum

& lsquo;Saxophone Idols Live in Action& rsquo; at Music Museum.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 19th, 2018

How could La Salle still make the UAAP 81 Final Four?

De La Salle University assured itself of at least a playoff for a Final Four berth in UAAP 81 last Wednesday. A week later, however, they are in danger of missing the playoffs entirely. Losing by double-digits to the University of the Philippines on Wednesday at the MOA Arena, the Green Archers ended the elimination round at 8-6. Technically, they are tied with the Fighting Maroons in the standings and Far Eastern University still has a chance to join them there if it downs Adamson University on Sunday. In case of that three-way tie, though, UP has the highest quotient among the three teams and has therefore taken the third-seed. Meaning, La Salle and FEU will have to figure in a playoff for the fourth and final playoff berth in such scenario. That is if, and only if, the Tamaraws triumph over the already second-seed Soaring Falcons. Whatever it is, it’s safe to say that the Taft-based team has no idea what will happen in the coming four days. Nonetheless, whether there will be a knockout bout with FEU or not, head coach Louie Gonzalez isn’t sweating. “Sa akin, ‘di naman problema yung kalaban,” he told reporters after their loss to the Fighting Maroons – their second straight to end the eliminations. He then continued, “Ang problema sa ngayon, yung team ko e. Yung integration namin.” Coach Louie was talking about the chemistry his wards will have to work on with returning reinforcement Taane Samuel. As he put it, “Kahit na wala kaming (reinforcement), nagko-compete yung team ko. Dapat ngayong may (reinformcent) na ako, dapat mas lumakas.” He then continued, “Kailangan naming ma-integrate si Taane and use it to our advantage, not to our disadvantage. Once naglalaro siya, dapat mas lumalakas kami.” Samuel missed 12 games of the season due to a Jones fracture on his left foot. He was back in action for the green and white up against archrival Ateneo de Manila University and then versus the Fighting Maroons – both matchups ending in losses. “The four guys around him need to figure out also kung ano yung adjustment,” coach Louie said. The good news is that he and his wards have more than enough time to figure things out. The possible playoff between La Salle and FEU is scheduled next Wednesday. And if the Tamaraws lose, they will have even more time to figure things out as by then, they will be the fourth-seed and will take on the top-seed Blue Eagles the Saturday after next. --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 14th, 2018

PVL: I don’t care –- Almadro on bashers

Ateneo-Motolite head coach Oliver Almadro isn’t bothered with the flak he received from fans on social media after giving Deanna Wong a tongue-lashing Saturday in a straight sets loss to BanKo in the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Open Conference. “I don’t care!” Almadro quickly answered even before reporters could finish their question about him trending on social media as he entered the pressroom for a post-game interview Sunday. Twitter went abuzz Saturday night following a clip during Ateneo-Motolite’s timeout where the very animated Almadro lashed out at Wong as the Lady Eagles trailed the Perlas Spikers, 7-11, in the third set with BanKo controlling the match, 2-0. Grabe naman. pic.twitter.com/H3CtjifrnI — PINOY BALIBOLISTA (@pinoybalibol) November 10, 2018 Fans went to social media to express their criticisms on Almadro. But the mentor, who steered the Blue Eagles to three straight UAAP titles, just brushed everything off.      “Few people don’t matter for me, what’s important for me is I use them as our strength,” said Almadro, whose squad recovered from a 24-26, 22-25, 16-25 loss to the Perlas Spikers with a 25-23, 16-25, 25-14, 25-20 win over Adamson-Akari. “I use them as a creative criticism for me and of course I don’t put energy in the things I don’t have control rather I put all my energy at things I have control, which is my team so yun ang importante.” Almadro said that even before the game his team was already dealing with off-court issues. “Natatawa ako kasi hindi naman nila alam ‘yung problema namin e, we have internal problems prior to the match medyo pagod kasi kami. Maraming players ang hindi dapat a-attend yesterday because of biglaang ‘Binhi’ it’s a school activity so talaga three players, four players will not come yesterday so everybody’s bothered,” he explained. “So they don’t know Deanna is bothered, everybody’s bothered pero good thing, Ateneo community, Ateneo professors, Binhi for mentors are really supporting the program so they opted to finish the Binhi earlier so nakapunta lahat pero of course bothered.” The mentor admitted that he took some time reading the fans’ reactions but kept firm on his action to discipline the UAAP Season 80 Best Setter.    “I read all of that but what matters for me sabi ko nga I will sacrifice my kindness so that my players will know what is right or wrong because life is cruel if you will just be kind all the time, they will not understand what is right or wrong,” he said. “As a parent sometimes I have to sacrifice kindness because life is cruel in the end because they have to know is right or wrong.” He scolded Wong, Almadro added, so that the playmaker will know her mistakes for her to address it. Wong only had 13 excellent sets out of 64 attempts against BanKo with five markers and seven digs. To make amends for her subpar performance, Wong tallied 28 excellent sets with four markers against the Lady Falcons. “Now Deanna is in the right position now. Deanna is gambling with the set now. We are receiving right today, so ibig sabihin we learned yesterday,” Almadro pointed out. Upon learning about the bashing he received, Wong apologized to Almadro, who then told his ward not to worry about it. “Deanna cried to me ‘coach sorry’. Bakit ka magso-sorry? It's my job,” he said. “And it’s your job to play now what's important is kaya mong bitbitin yun kaya mong dalhin.” “And what did she do now? She played well, it’s because hindi kami nagpapa-bother sa mga nandiyan. What’s important for us are those who believe in us, those who fight for us win or lose,” Almadro added. “I will always reiterate to my players right motivation, right motivation every time because ‘pag pinasukan ng wrong motivation ang utak mawawala sa pwesto, hindi kikilos. It’s because walang meaning sa ginagawa so kailangan talaga right motivation.” Almadro still gave some kind words to his bashers.   “Those who do not support us when we lose, it’s okay with us. We still pray for them,” he said.     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 11th, 2018

Non-stop action in & lsquo;Hunter Killer& rsquo;

Non-stop action in & lsquo;Hunter Killer& rsquo;.....»»

Category: entertainmentSource:  thestandardRelated NewsNov 2nd, 2018