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A BLISSFUL FOREVER

Page Maker: Zedrick Señeres THEIR love story unfolded in Singapore when the charming Ilongga Princess Carollyn Anne Sazon was working as a full-time nurse and the debonair Spain-based lawyer Francisco Javier Colomer met. “We started dating in September 2015 and I went home to Iloilo while he went back to Spain. His distance, there and […] The post A BLISSFUL FOREVER appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource: thedailyguardian thedailyguardianJun 13th, 2018

WATCH: Kitkat stuns Japanese with ‘BAAM’ dance in Kyoto streets

Momoland's "BAAM" dance craze has taken the Philippines by storm. Comedienne Kitkat brought the fever to Japan during her impromptu dance numbers in the streets of Kyoto. While on a vacation with her husband Waldy Fabia in the land of the rising sun, Kitkat made sure she will forever be remembered by locals and tourists alike with her all outperformances, videos of which she shared via Instagramlast Monday, Sept. 17. Kitkat, who was channeling Korean fashion with her skin-toned, knee-length romper, printed sneakers and hair in pigtails, moved to the beat of the K-pop girl group's latest track at theFushimi Inari Taisha. Curious onlookers watched as she danced like no one's watc...Keep on reading: WATCH: Kitkat stuns Japanese with ‘BAAM’ dance in Kyoto streets.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 19th, 2018

In Focus: Why LaurDIY and Alex Wassabi Will Forever Be Our Favorite YouTube Couple

#PrettyLittleWassabians are going to miss seeing Wachubby and Chicken Nugget together!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 17th, 2018

Palparan’s conviction a warning to human rights violators — lawyers, activists

Several lawyers and activists hailed the conviction of Major General Jovito Palparan on Monday, saying it is a warning to "all human rights violators." "We welcome the verdict rendered against "The Butcher". We congratulate the families, lawyers and human rights advocates who worked tirelessly to achieve justice for Karen and She," Bayan Secretary General Renato Reyes said in a statement. "This is a warning to all human rights violators. Impunity is not forever. The time of reckoning has come," Reyes added. The National Union of People's Lawyers (NUPL) seconded Reyes' statement, warning other violators of a retribution. "We really do wish he faces perdition that he brought up...Keep on reading: Palparan’s conviction a warning to human rights violators — lawyers, activists.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 17th, 2018

Grace in Brokenness: The Story of Teacher Nicole

“Amidst the roughness in the many facets of life, it is always a blessing to continue enjoying the beauty of God’s wonders, and have a prayerful patience to adhere to God’s plan and purpose of our existence. So, be a teacher in His blissful grace even in brokenness,” Morishka Nicole Dela Torre Uy (Teacher Nicole) […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Here s why Chris Webber should be in the Hall of Fame

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst C-Webb needs to be in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. My Turner colleague Chris Webber has always brought out polarizing opinions -- first as a player, and now as a broadcaster. And I’m not objective when it comes to him, either. I love the guy. He’s a true student of the game, not afraid to speak his mind on and off the court, and is someone whose love for the game knows no equal. It’s just a matter of time before he gets his chance to run a team, either in the front office or as a part-owner. But it will and should happen. And, after his impactful career as a player, he should be enshrined in Springfield. Everyone’s criteria for the Hall is different. To me, getting in the Hall as a player requires a yes answer to two questions: 1) were you among the very best at your position for a substantial period of time during your career, and 2) did your presence and/or play change the game in a meaningful way while you played? (This is why a guy like Sixers guard Andrew Toney, in my view, is HOF-worthy, even though “The Boston Strangler” played from 1980-88 and was limited significantly by injury in two of those seasons.) Webber is a “yes” to both of those questions. In the NBA, Webber was a five-time All-Star, four times with the Kings, and was Rookie of the Year in 1993. He was first- or second-team All NBA four times. His career PER of 20.9 is the highest of any non-retired and Hall of Fame eligible player that isn’t currently in the Hall. (Tim Duncan, Kobe Bryant and Kevin Garnett each have higher PERs than Webber, and each is an obvious HOF lock, but they aren’t Hall of Fame eligible until 2020.) Webber’s career PER is better than those of Hall of Famers including Allen Iverson, Bob McAdoo, Ed McCauley, George McGinnis, Billy Cunningham, Steve Nash, David Thompson, Connie Hawkins, Alex English, Walt Bellamy, Cliff Hagan and many others. Yet in his fifth year of eligibility, Webber was again passed over by the Hall of Fame voters this year. That needs to change. His impact on the game, from high school to being a member of the “Fab Five” at Michigan in college and during his 15 NBA seasons, is undeniable. The Hall encompasses all of a person’s basketball achievements, and Webber’s career is Hall-worthy. At Country Day High School in Michigan, he led his team to three state championships, averaging 29 points and 13 rebounds per game his senior season, when he was a consensus national player of the year. He then decided to cap an incredible recruiting class, which had three of the top 10 players in the country, among a group of freshmen that came to be known as “The Fab Five.” (Also on that Michigan team was a junior guard who averaged 2.9 points per game, who had no future as pro player, but who carved out a place for himself nonetheless in the NBA -- Rob Pelinka, who became a high-powered agent representing the likes of Kobe Bryant before becoming the Lakers’ General Manager in 2017.) “The Fab Five”, like it or not -- and, I liked it very much -- changed basketball forever. And Webber was the lynchpin of those Michigan teams that reached consecutive NCAA championship games in 1992 and ‘93. Across the board, the Fab Five had long-lasting impact. Aesthetically, they were vanguards, wearing long, loooong shorts that became all the rage throughout basketball.  And while trash talking has been at the heart of hoops for generations, Michigan raised it to a team-wide art form. It drove traditionalists crazy, while kids watching at home loved it. They were the accelerant to the “one-and-done” era, even though none of them left Michigan after their freshman season. But seeing five freshmen start games and play the lion’s share of minutes rippled throughout the college game. Going forward, teams didn’t just recruit blue-chippers, they put them on the floor immediately. What John Calipari does annually at Kentucky now is but the logical conclusion to what Michigan started, and every Power 5 team in college basketball has had to follow suit or get left behind. Of course, “The Fab Five” era wound up being star-crossed. I’m well aware of the penalties assessed to the Michigan program because of the money that Ed Martin gave to players, including Webber. The university vacated the ‘92-93 season, including all of its NCAA Tournament games that year, and took down the banners commemorating “The Fab Five” and their two Final Four runs. (Michigan also vacated all of its games from 1995-96 because of Martin’s associations with other players on teams during those seasons, and its ‘93, ‘96 and ‘98 NCAA Tournament appearances, as well as its ‘97 NIT title and ‘98 Big 10 Tournament championship.) It’s obvious to me that if not for his involvement with Martin, Webber would have been on the 2000 U.S. Olympic team, which won the gold medal in Australia, as well -- another potential feather in his cap that would bolster his Hall of Fame credentials. I will say, as delicately as I can, that there are coaches and players in the Hall that have been accused of doing some of the very things that got Michigan and Webber in so much trouble. That, in and of itself, should not be disqualifying. Webber’s NBA career also did not include a championship. But he was just as impactful on the pro game. Beginning in Golden State and Washington, C-Webb was a category all his own -- a big man with catcher’s mitts for hands who could pulverize in transition, yet was also an incredibly deft passer, both from the post or out front. As a rookie, Webber elevated Golden State from a 34-48 record in 1992-93 to 50-32 the next season. Traded to Washington after that one season with the Warriors, having conflicted mightily with Coach Don Nelson, Webber helped get the then-Bullets to the postseason for the first time in nine years. Once there, the Bullets went toe-to-toe with the defending-champion Bulls in a tough, three-game first-round series in ’97. But it wasn’t until Webber was sent to what was then the equivalent of Siberia in the NBA -- Sacramento -- that his game reached full flower. Playing with another excellent passing big man in Vlade Divac, and a flashy savant of a point guard in Jason Williams, Webber and the Kings were the vanguard of the modern NBA game, coming to fruition years before the Suns’ Seven Seconds or Less attack led by one of last week’s Hall of Fame inductees, Steve Nash. The Kings moved the ball with flair and purpose. The Warriors have changed the game forever by stretching the floor to the breaking point for opposing defenses with their 3-point proficiency, but even they didn’t have what Sacramento possessed -- two bigs who could initiate and finish from anywhere inside the 3-point line. No one could do what the Kings could do, and with Webber, Sacramento changed almost overnight from perennial joke to perennial championship contender. The Kings made the playoffs six straight seasons, reaching the Western Conference finals in 2002 before losing in controversial fashion to the Lakers in seven games. Webber’s knee injury during the Kings’ semifinal playoff series with Dallas in 2003 marked the beginning of the end for him and the Kings. If he hadn’t gotten hurt, Sacramento probably would have beaten the Mavericks and played San Antonio in the West finals. And while San Antonio would have been favored in that series, the Kings would have had a chance, with the winner facing the Nets in The Finals that year. And a championship would also have made C-Webb’s pro career look much different. But, that didn’t happen. It doesn’t matter, though. Webb’s career stands on its own merits. At all levels, he has had impact and changed the game, and he deserves to have his moment in the sun in Springfield. Sometimes it takes players of merit a little longer, for various reasons -- think Spencer Haywood, or, this year, Mo Cheeks. Chris Webber is a Hall of Famer, and it isn’t a close call. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

The CEO as financial educator

  For TransUnion Phils CEO Pia Arellano, financial literacy leads to fiscal responsibility Credit assessment and rating remain unknown entities to many Filipinos, unlike in the United States where millions of credit card owners have a healthy awareness of how much their credit (or lack of it) impacts their economic lives. The blissful ignorance is [...] The post The CEO as financial educator appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsSep 8th, 2018

Reuniting tandem examines breakups in ‘Exes Baggage’

  Actor Carlo Aquino said he and Angelica Panganiban are thrilled about the public's support for their onscreen tandem and hope this would translate to their film's box-office success.   "Whenever I would post something about me and Carlo on social media, I'm excited to read the comments because I'm confident that all of them are positive. Some of the posts are hilarious," Angelica told the Inquirer over lunch on Tuesday.   "One said 'OK lang na 'di ako magka-love life, magkabalikan lang kayo.' It's like they will finally believe in 'forever' if Caloy (Carlo's nickname) and I reconcile. Sa amin nakasalalay ang forever nila," she added.   Carlo...Keep on reading: Reuniting tandem examines breakups in ‘Exes Baggage’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 7th, 2018

Trillanes reminds Calida, Guevarra: Duterte will not be forever president

Sen. Antonio Trillanes on Thursday vowed that he will run after officials of the administration if they will continue to stand by President Rodrigo Duterte’s Proclamation No. 572......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 6th, 2018

Walang forever sa amnesty?

Walang forever sa amnesty? By: Jose Mari BFU Tirol, Ll.M. (The author is the dean of the University of San Agustin’s College of Law) The President has the power to grant amnesty with the concurrence of a majority of all the Members of the Congress (Art. VII Sec. 19, Philippine Constitution). Criminal liability is totally extinguished […] The post Walang forever sa amnesty? appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsSep 5th, 2018

Worth a thousand words: NBA photographer Andrew Bernstein details his best shots

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Andrew Bernstein knew he wanted to be a sports photographer or maybe a documentary filmmaker. Trouble was, he recalled recently, his school at the time – the University of Massachusetts Amherst – offered courses in neither photography nor film. Not exactly a well-planned start to his chosen career. So Bernstein transferred to the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, Calif. And once the native of Brooklyn stepped off the plane into 85-degree sunshine, he was hooked. Thus began a professional path that has taken him around the world, yet kept him Los Angeles-centric as the NBA’s senior photographer. A part-time job as an assistant to Sports Illustrated shooters helped Bernstein score his first NBA gig as a photographer the 1983 All-Star Game at L.A.’s famous Forum. He’d eventually serve as team photographer for the city’s Dodgers, Lakers, Clippers and Kings, but it was in his work for the NBA that Bernstein made his greatest mark. In 1986, Bernstein helped create NBA Photos as the league’s in-house licensing agency, for which he served as senior director until 2011. He chronicled Team USA through its 1992, 1996 and 2000 Olympic championships, and has worked 36 NBA Finals and All-Star Games. Next month, his hardcover collaboration with Kobe Bryant -- “The Mamba Mentality: How I Play” -- will hit bookshelves everywhere. This week as part of the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame induction ceremonies, the 60-year-old photographer will be honored as a recipient of the 2018 Curt Gowdy Media Award. To shed light on his craft and share some behind-the-scenes tales, Bernstein -- prior to heading to Springfield, Mass. -- talked with NBA.com about some of his favorite and most famous images. Come fly with him ... Details: Michael Jordan soars with several Lakers in futile pursuit at the 1988 Hall of Fame preseason game between Chicago and Los Angeles at the Springfield Civic Center. Bernstein: “It was one of those crazy moments -- in those days, I could only do one remote camera. Now I can do almost an infinite number because it’s all done by radio. But back then, you had to hard-wire into the strobe [lighting] system for the big flashes, and you could only fire one. I chose the one shooting through the glass, behind the backboard. A lot of things could have gone wrong. His hand could have been in his face. He could have been out of the frame instead of just on the edge. I could only take one shot every four seconds [with the strobe] -- it’s not like I could lean on the motor drive and then pick one frame out of 10. … But it became known as “Come Fly with Me.” It did kind of define him at the time as being able to fly.” Back story: Bernstein added: “If you have a microscope, you can actually see me on the other side of the court, sitting there with a little trigger button. Then there’s the trivia question of all time -- who’s the other guy? That No. 3 happens to be [University of Virginia star and NBA role player] Jeff Lamp.” MJ: Champion, finally Details: Michael Jordan and his father, James, in the visitors’ dressing room at the Forum, after Game 5 of the 1991 Finals. Bulls 108, Lakers 101. Bernstein: “The network would do the trophy presentation in the winning team’s locker room, and the visitors’ side at the Forum was about the size of a closet. There seemed to be a thousand people in there, and all hell was breaking loose. I got up on top of a table in the middle of the room for a vantage point. When they came back live from a commercial, they wanted to have Michael on -- but they couldn’t find Michael. Some sixth sense said, ‘Look to your left,’ and there he was, in the locker, hugging that trophy, crying his eyes out with his dad next to him. I always felt, if he’d had to play that whole season for free to get to the mountain top, he would have. I knew this was a special moment. I banged a couple of frames really quick.” Back story: After James Jordan was murdered in 1993, Bernstein got a phone call from Michael’s office saying he “would love it if I made a print and sent it to him,” Bernstein said. “Which I did. I was very close with my dad and Michael Jordan knew him -- my dad was with me through the entire Dream Team experience [in 1992]. And I knew his dad. So it was a poignant moment in my career to have him request that photo. If I had to pick one photo to put on my tombstone, this would probably be it.” ‘Mamba’ coiled to strike Details: Shot from a camera suspended in the rafters at the Forum, a Hasselblad 120mm with a 350mm lens. “A heavy rig,” Bernstein called it, anchored with multiple clamps and safety cables on the catwalk, aimed straight down. Bernstein: “I love the composition of this photo and how everything just came together. The Forum had that beautiful Laker-gold ‘key.’ This was young Kobe, his first or second year, and he was a dunk machine back then. Look how he’s cocked back like that and flying thorugh the air, the basket right there. All the elements came together. When I saw this the next morning -- I had to take the film to the lab after the game, drop it off, then go back in the morning after sweating it out all night, hoping that I’d see something like this -- I was like, ‘Wow!’ All the preparation, hours and hours, setting the equipment up, and it all paid off.” Back story: It’s not common to see the top of a player’s head and the bottom of his sneakers in the same shot. Bernstein knew he had to share it and, thanks to the large-format film, he knew he could share it big. “As soon as I saw this,” he said, “I immediately made a giant print for Kobe -- I mean, like 50 [inches] by 70. Huge. I framed it and drove it to his house. He was living with his parents in Pacific Palisades at the time. I hope he still has it. I had given players like Magic [Johnson] and whomever 8x10s, but I never had framed something I was super-proud of.” Old Kobe ‘dunking’ again Details: Kobe Bryant, deep in his career, before a game against the New York Knicks at Madison Square Garden in January 2010. Bernstein: “During a long East Coast trip, the Lakers had played the night before in Cleveland and were at the Garden less than 24 hours later. Kobe was banged up that year. This was an hour and a half to game time, and he was literally willing himself to play that night. Both ankles are in ice. He’s got the finger in a little cup of ice. During my pregame routine, walking from the locker room to the training room, I just saw him there. Other guys were coming and going, but he was in this meditative state. I took one frame -- God forbid the click of the camera disturb or distract him. Phil [Jackson] called this ‘The Thinker,’ like Rodin’s sculpture.” Back story: A skilled photographer learns how quickly how to be unobtrusive, a “fly on the wall.” Said Bernstein: “You have to, to get behind-the-scenes intimate photos of players away from the bright lights, and what goes on in the bowels of the arena or during travel. In 2009-10, Phil and I collaborated on a book called ‘Journey to the Ring,’ which took the Lakers from media day to whenever their season would end. They ended up winning it all that year, which was unbelievable for the project. The photos were in black-and-white, which was a conscious decision Phil and I made.” Photographer, shoot thyself Details: Kobe Bryant and Andrew Bernstein before the 2016 NBA All-Star Game, Western Conference locker room at Toronto’s Air Canada Centre. Bernstein: “This was his last All-Star Game and it was a true Kobe love-fest. I spent the entire weekend just with him, followed him everywhere he went. I mean, I didn’t cover it like I normally do for the NBA, and NBA Photos was very generous for letting me cover it through him. It was a beautiful weekend. He took it all in and was very appreciative. His humility came out -- a lot of people don’t think Kobe is humble, but I think he was. And he was very grateful, that he had an impact on all these All-Stars who were grateful to him.” Back story: The locker room was closed to the media, but as the league’s guy, Bernstein always has special access. “A couple of people were coming over to get photos with him -- Gregg Popovich, Russell Westbrook, Chris Paul and a couple others,” the photographer said. “And I just jumped in myself. Very, very rarely -- I mean, four times in our 20 years together -- did I jump in the picture with him. But I couldn’t resist.” Shadowing the superstars Details: Another overhead shot at the Forum, this time during the 1991 Finals, with Magic Johnson and Michael Jordan fighting for what eventually will be a rebound. Bernstein: “With this angle, it’s always a crap shoot what you’re going to get. The rim could be blocking a guy’s face. Somebody could be too far under the basket. The focus point is so critical -- you have to be right on where it’s focused. As for the shadows, if you can imagine lights in each corner of the court, way up high. It just depended on where the players were placed. If one of them is blocking the light on one side, you get a shadow off to the other side. It’s always dramatic with the strobe. But just to get these two icons in the same frame was difficult.” Back story: Just as the famous parquet court at Boston Garden looked so iconic on TV and from afar, the Forum was best viewed from a distance. The paint worn off the top of the rim by balls and hands was something few ever saw. “The Forum was a dump,” Bernstein said. “The walls were caked with dirt. Nobody ever cleaned it. They used to feed us under the stands where the rodents were. It was like a Hollywood impostor, and it’s in Inglewood, which is not your glitzy Hollywood location. But they made it look good on TV. It was a tough place to work, I have to tell you.” Brothers in arms Details: A fisheye lens captures the moments immediately after Game 5 of 2017 Finals, with Golden State’s Kevin Durant and Stephen Curry front and center. Bernstein: “I’ve gotten good at getting out and being the first guy in the scrum. When a championship is won, I sharpen my elbows and just go for it. I try to be right next to the TV guy and well, I guess people know me and I make my way to wherever I have to be. This particular time, I knew there had to be a moment in there where Curry and Durant had an interaction. And it was amazing -- they’re almost like one body. It’s Kevin’s first championship and Steph is so happy for him as his teammate. And the pressure that was on the whole team to win this championship. I love this picture. It shows so much about the way I work and how I think about what I need to do in the moment.” Back story: Bernstein’s camera captured Durant’s mother Wanda to the left, crying and enjoying the moment. But a few seconds earlier, he said, “his mom came up and grabbed him by the front of the jersey. She kept yelling, ‘We did it! We did it!’ That’s a great picture too.” ‘Uncoachable?’ Unforgettable Details: Kobe Bryant and Phil Jackson share a moment after beating the Magic in Game 5 and winning the 2009 NBA championship at Orlando’s Amway Arena. Bernstein: “If you remember the 2008-09 season, there was a lot of pressure on Kobe. People had been saying that he couldn’t win without Shaq, Phil had actually written that he was ‘uncoachable.’ But there’s such a paternal father-son thing going on in this picture. … I know I’ve got to go to the star player immediately at the buzzer. So I ran out and found Kobe. Phil and he had just come together and they were hugging, which is a nice picture. But I knew the instant after a hug can be just as special. Something told me to wait till after the hug -- because [with the limitation of the strobe lights] I can’t shoot rapidly -- and bing! They broke the hug and Phil’s looking like, ‘Job well done, son.’ And Kobe has this amazing look of relief and sense of accomplishment and exhaustion.” Back story: Bernstein said this is the only print of his work that his wife, Mariel, allows him to hang in their house. “We have three teenagers [at the time] who basically were the same age, all within a year of each other, and when all hell was breaking loose at our house, we’d stand the kids in front of this photo. My wife would say, ‘Look at that! If those two guys can get along and be respectful, we can do it in this house.’ ” Forever linked Details: The Celtics’ Larry Bird and the Lakers’ Magic Johnson fight for rebounding position along the foul lane at Boston Garden in the 1987 Finals. Bernstein: “This is probably my most well-known image, other than the one of Jordan hugging the trophy. Remember, these guys played different positions. They never really matched up. You’d never see Magic D-ing up Bird like you would with Michael or Isiah Thomas. And you’d never, ever see Bird D-ing Magic. I had to be unbelievably conscious of when they were on the court together, where they were on the court and somehow, if they would end up in my frame. The only times, honestly, I could ever get them in the same frame was the ‘captains’ meeting’ five minutes before tip at center court, shaking hands, and a free-throw situation. When, by the grace of God, they would line up facing me. That’s what this was. Back story: Just as Bird and Johnson were linked literally, arm in arm, in this photograph, their careers were linked figuratively through the NBA of the 1980s. “It kind of defined the era,” Bernstein said. “These two great guys intertwined, neither of them looking superior to the other. Jostling for position, just like the Celtics and the Lakers did. I love this picture, and I know both of those guys love it. This picture is hanging in the Hall of Fame.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 4th, 2018

JC Bonnin: Forever Bagets

JC Bonnin in the US For those who grew up in the neon-drenched '80s, JC Bonnin was the dream boy to beat--the mestizo kid who could unleash a mean flying kick. On the small screen, he was cast.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsSep 3rd, 2018

JC Bonnin: Forever ‘Bagets’

For those who grew up in the neon-drenched '80s, JC Bonnin was the dream boy to beat---the mestizo kid who could unleash a mean flying kick. On the small screen, he was cast as the suave suitor of Janice de Belen in "Flordeluna," while on the big screen, he played the annoying admirer of Sharon Cuneta in "Cross My Heart," before hitting the big-time as one of the heartthrobs of "Bagets"---along with William Martinez, Raymond Lauchengco, Herbert Bautista and Aga Muhlach. Becoming an actor was a no-brainer since his last name was Bonnin, after all. (Original "Palos" Bernard Bonnin was an uncle, which makes beauty queen Charlene Gonzalez his cousin.) By his own admission, he was a...Keep on reading: JC Bonnin: Forever ‘Bagets’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 2nd, 2018

Miss Universe 2015 2nd runner-up Olivia Jordan is engaged

MANILA, Philippines – Miss Universe 2015 2nd runner-up Olivia Jordan is engaged. On Thursday, August 30, the former beauty queen and model shared on Instagram photos of how her boyfriend, actor Jay Hector proposed. "He got down on one knee and asked if I could love him forever. Forever doesn’t even ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 31st, 2018

Reviving motorsports one step at a time

It’s funny how things change and some don’t. This is so true with local Motorsports and what we saw so many years ago is still the same today. My forever partner and I just came from our successful Nissan Road Safety Seminar in Cebu last week and have trained more than 35 drivers to become [...] The post Reviving motorsports one step at a time appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimesRelated NewsAug 25th, 2018

Emotional farewells as North and South Koreans part for last time

SEOUL, South Korea – Clinging to each other for every last second, elderly North and South Korean family members allowed to meet for the first time in nearly 7 decades bid tearful farewells Wednesday, August 22, probably forever. Millions of people were swept apart by the 1950-53 Korean War, which ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsAug 23rd, 2018

8 movies to be screened at the International Silent Film Festival

WHILE MORE than half of the Philippines’ film collection has been lost forever because of the country’s lack of technology in conservation and restoration, and also of the lack of foresight over the importance of intact films, which includes silent movies, the Philippines is still able to join the 12th International Silent Film Festival, which will be held from Aug. 30 to Sept. 2 at the SM Megamall. The post 8 movies to be screened at the International Silent Film Festival appeared first on BusinessWorld......»»

Category: newsSource:  bworldonlineRelated NewsAug 21st, 2018

What Ogie Alcasid is OA about

After three decades (and counting!), Ogie Alcasid still has what it takes to hit our hearts in all the right spots with his songs. Let's celebrate the master songwriter's 30th anniversary in the biz and his 51st birthday on Aug. 24, 8 p.m. at the Big Dome in his concert, "OA" (for tickets, call 9115555). I'm more than happy to be one of Ogie's close friends. He is super down-to-earth, that I almost forget how famous he is. I am forever grateful to Ogs for being so game to sing in all my parties. His impromptu "mini-concert" is the highlight of my celebrations. I was touched when he bought me a special edition of Rolling Stone magazine, featuring Michael Jackson. Ogs said that as s...Keep on reading: What Ogie Alcasid is OA about.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsAug 20th, 2018

Love for all ages: ‘Kasalang Bayan’ in Cavite grants dream wedding to 20 couples

As flowing white curtains were drawn open, a bride—glowing, beautiful and filled with emotions—emerged. She began walking down the church aisle, all eyes on her especially one pair. At the end of her walk, down the altar, the equally emotional groom awaited to take her hands to forever......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsAug 15th, 2018

LSGH champion guard foregoes basketball for studies in Ateneo

Joel Cagulangan and Inand Fornilos are still main men while Joshua David and Ladis Lepalam remain as key contributors for College of St. Benilde-La Salle Greenhills in its title defense. One starter from that championship-winning team, though, is no longer suiting up – as a player, at least. Starting off-guard Jacob Lao is now part of the coaching staff for the Junior Blazers – just a year after graduating high school. Last year, he averaged 4.7 points including one triple and 2.8 rebounds. He also chipped in eight points and four rebounds in their title-clinching Game 3 win. Now, in the ongoing NCAA Season 94, he can be seen huddling with the coaches and handing out advice to the players. Along with wearing a different uniform inside the court, apparently Lao is now also wearing a different uniform outside the court. – and not just a different uniform, but the total opposite of that which he has been used to wearing. Asked where he has taken his talents to next, he told reporters with a grin, “Ateneo.” Yes, the CSB-LSGH champion guard is now studying BS Management in Ateneo de Manila University. He hasn’t turned into a Blue Eagle just yet, though. “I chose studies this time over basketball because this time, I want to focus on studies muna,” he said. For Lao, it’s about time that he prioritizes the student aspect of being a student-athlete. “Ang thinking ko kasi talaga is that basketball is not forever. Gusto ko munang i-prioritize yung studies kasi I can adjust naman (if ever) I want to play,” he said. After all, the son of Frank Lao who owns the Choi Garden line of restaurants will have to be involved in the family business sooner rather than later. Lao’s decision has the full support of both his family and his former team. “I made the decision (last May), but before I made it, I consulted with everyone from [CSB-LSGH head] coach Marvin [Bienvenida] to my parents. Sabi nila, if tama sa akin, then go,” he said. And apparently, this decision has been in the works for a long time. “When we won the championship, naisip kong kahit anong mangyari sa Seniors, studies muna ako,” he said. While he’s walking away from basketball, for now at least, the former Junior Blazers will always have the memories of that first-ever championship they brought home to Ortigas. “More than the championship, it was the brotherhood. Kaya nga I asked coach Marvin kung pwede akong maging assistant kasi ang hirap iwan yung samahan namin,” he said. And when that time comes that basketball comes knocking on his door anew, Lao said he’s only winning to entertain it. As he put it, “If ever maglaro ako ulit, nandun lang naman yung basketball.” Perhaps, a visit from Ateneo head coach Tab Baldwin just might do the trick? --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @riegogogo......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsAug 13th, 2018

More than basketball: Brownlee wants to stay in Philippines for good, says Chua

Photo by Tristan Tamayo/INQUIRER.net Not only does Justin Brownlee wishes to play for Barangay Ginebra forever, he also wants the Philippines to be his permanent home. Alfrancis Chua, Barangay Gine.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsAug 13th, 2018