Advertisements


25 people, mostly students, killed in Malaysia school fire

25 people, mostly students, killed in Malaysia school fire.....»»

Category: newsSource: manilatimes_net manilatimes_netSep 14th, 2017

Malaysia police arrest 7 boys linked to deadly school fire

KUALA LUMPUR — Malaysian police said yesterday they have arrested seven boys suspected of intentionally starting a fire at an Islamic boarding school that ki.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 16th, 2017

Malaysia arrests suspects in deadly school fire

Malaysia arrests suspects in deadly school fire.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 16th, 2017

Malaysia probes foul play in deadly school fire as anger mounts

Malaysia probes foul play in deadly school fire as anger mounts.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 15th, 2017

Malaysia conducts burial of school fire victims

KUALA LUMPUR — Malaysian authorities conducted the burial on yesterday of 23 mostly young boys who died in a fire at a private Islamic boarding school that h.....»»

Category: worldSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 15th, 2017

Malaysia school fire kills 23 children and teachers

Malaysia school fire kills 23 children and teachers.....»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 14th, 2017

Weekly Reflections: Fanaticism and indifference: The Marawi Crisis

“Who is my neighbor?” - Luke 10:29b The Marawi Crisis Marawi is on fire! This perhaps is an appropriate description of the war going on in Marawi City since last week. Some building facilities of our school, Dansalan College, were burned down by the Maute Terrorist Group that invaded this peaceful Muslim City in the South, creating havoc and terror among hapless innocent people. As of this writing hundreds already died from both sides of the government forces and the terrorist group, and thousands have to evacuate to nearby places, like Iligan City. But many are still held hostage by the Maute Terrorist Group or simply trapped inside the city in ruins......»»

Category: newsSource:  nordisRelated NewsJun 11th, 2017

Libyan-Canadian cleric linked to Manchester bomber plans return to Canada to clear his name – CBC News

A Libyan-Canadian cleric linked in U.S. and British media reports to Manchester bomber Salman Abedi says he will return to Canada in weeks with the intention of clearing his name. Abdul Baset Egwilla was an Ottawa-based imam until his return to Libya in 2007. In an exclusive interview with CBC News over Skype, Egwilla denied any connection to Abedi. &'8220;I challenge whoever accuses me of such a connection to produce evidence, such as a time, date and place where I met with the suicide bomber,&'8221; Egwilla said. CBC News has agreed not to disclose Egwilla's current location due to concerns for his safety, as he is the subject of death threats in Libya. Salman Abedi, 22, was identified on May 23 as the suicide bomber who killed 22 people and wounded more than 60 others, including children, at a pop concert in Manchester. ISIS has claimed responsibility for the attack. The bomber's father, Ramadan Abedi, who denies his son was a member of ISIS, has since been arrested by Libyan counter-terrorism officers. U.S. and British media reports, citing anonymous sources, have claimed a link between Salman, his father and Libyan-Canadian cleric Egwilla. A senior American official told the New York Times on May 24 that Salman Abedi &'8220;had links to a radical preacher in Libya&'8221; identified as Abdul Baset Egwilla, and that Egwilla's son had died fighting for ISIS. Egwilla's son did die in 2016, but Libyan news reports and a martyrdom notice at the time said he was killed fighting for the Omar Mukhtar Brigade, a Libyan Islamist militia that is not a listed terrorist organization. The Times newspaper in the U.K. reported May 27 that Ramadan Abedi was an associate of &'8220;extremist Canadian-Libyan preacher&'8221; Egwilla, and that the Libyan-Canadian is believed to have radicalized Ramadan's son, Salman Abedi. The father would regularly meet with Egwilla at Friday prayers in the Libyan capital, Tripoli, in 2015, added the Times, citing a resident of the city who asked not to be named. The Greater Manchester Police Force would neither confirm nor deny to CBC News that Egwilla is under investigation for possible involvement in the Manchester bombing. Egwilla, who has been absent from Libya for several months since fleeing a plot to assassinate him, said he has never, to his knowledge, met either Salman or Ramadan Abedi. &'8220;I am a public figure, I appear in the media. I show up in mosques and preach to a multitude of people. People know me, but I do not know them,&'8221; Egwilla said. &'8220;And if I met him once or twice before, it could be that he changed his beliefs later on, but I never met him in the first place,&'8221; Egwilla said of the Manchester bomber. Declassified documents released by Canada's Integrated Terrorism Assessment Centre in 2014 flagged a YouTube video in which Egwilla is seen &'8220;promoting violent jihad in Libya.&'8221; &'8220;In the video, Egwilla urged an audience of Libyan Islamist fighters to take part in jihad, stating that 'jihad is simply and easily accessible, and does not require moving as in the past, as it was for Afghanistan and Iraq,'&'8221; the report said. Egwilla says that call to jihad was made to recruit people to fight specifically against a militia led by a former general in Moammar Gadhafi's regime, and not a call to support the global jihadi movement. &'8220;I spoke about jihad only through Fajr Libya Dawn (a rebel militia alliance) and only when [Moammar Gadhafi] suppressed peaceful demonstrators and bombed them with anti-aircraft weaponry,&'8221; said Egwilla. &'8220;This was unjust and an act of tyranny.&'8221; Egwilla said people claiming to be with the government of Canada have attempted to reach out to him using the app Viber, though he says he has never agreed to an interview. Egwilla said he intends to speak to authorities to clear his name when he returns to Canada. After seven years in Ottawa, Egwilla left Canada for Libya in 2007, when Gadhafi's regime began sending signals that it would not persecute returning dissidents. ​ He began working at a Tripoli religious radio station and associated with a group of clerics that included Sadiq al-Ghariani, who today is the country's Grand Mufti, the top religious leader, and a strong supporter of Islamist militias. When rebellion broke out in 2011, Egwilla was a prominent supporter, and after the fall of Gadhafi's regime, was promoted to be the administrative director for the mosques in Tripoli. He said he became a prominent imam and broadcaster. In 2014, as splits emerged between liberals and Islamists over the direction post-Gadhafi Libya should take, Egwilla identified with the &'8220;Libya Dawn&'8221; coalition of Islamist militias that seized Tripoli from the UN-backed government. Libya Dawn soon found itself involved in a war with the secular forces of Gadhafi-era general Khalifa Haftar, and Egwilla's Ottawa-raised son Owais joined one of the Islamist militias battling Haftar. Owais died in combat in March last year. It was reported in some quarters that Owais Egwilla had died fighting for Islamic State. In fact, martyrdom notices posted at the time of his death show him as a member of the Omar Mukhtar Brigade, an Islamist militia that was part of the coalition that fought Islamic State and drove it out of its Libyan stronghold in Sirte. Egwilla says he fled Libya eight months ago following the kidnapping and murder of fellow cleric Nadir al-Omrani by assassins of the Madkhali sect of Sunni Islam. Madkhalis, followers of a school of thought founded by a Saudi cleric, have become increasingly active in Libya. Like Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, Madkhalis in Libya have destroyed ancient shrines and manuscripts they deem un-Islamic and they consider voting to be heresy. In a videotaped confession seen by CBC News, one of [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJun 5th, 2017

WEEKLY REFLECTIONS: FANATICISM AND INDIFFERENCE: THE MARAWI CRISIS

“Who is my neighbor?” - Luke 10:29b The Marawi Crisis Marawi is on fire! This perhaps is an appropriate description of the war going on in Marawi City since last week. Some building facilities of our school, Dansalan College, were burned down by the Maute Terrorist Group that invaded this peaceful Muslim City in the South, creating havoc and terror among hapless innocent people. As of this writing hundreds already died from both sides of the government forces and the terrorist group, and thousands have to evacuate to nearby places, like Iligan City. But many are still held hostage by the Maute Terrorist Group or simply trapped inside the city in ruins......»»

Category: newsSource:  nordisRelated NewsJun 4th, 2017

From ‘happily ever after’ to hell – CNN News

Islam and Ahmed met online, looking for their &'8220;happily ever after&'8221; through a Muslim dating site. But instead of bringing love and contentment, their marriage left Islam trapped in a living nightmare. Fast forward four years &'8212; and three husbands &'' and she and her two small children are caught in limbo in northern Syria. Islam Mitat is from Morocco; Ahmed Khalil was originally from Kabul in Afghanistan, but had moved to the UK and become a British citizen by the time they met on Muslima.com. Mitat dreamed of a career as a fashion designer, and saw a British husband as a way out of her drab existence in the Moroccan town of Oujda, near the Algerian border. Months after their first online encounter, Khalil traveled to Morocco with a woman he said was his sister. He met Mitat's family, and proposed marriage, showing them bank statements to prove his intentions were serious. &'8220;He was a normal person,&'8221; Mitat recalls, though she says he did make her swap her regular choice of clothing &'8212; tight jeans and t-shirts &'' for long dresses. After they were married, the couple traveled to Dubai, and from there to Jalalabad in Afghanistan to meet Ahmed's family. Mitat says she only stayed in Afghanistan for a month, because of the security situation there, before returning home to Morocco. Khalil went back to Dubai, but shortly afterward he called her with news. &'8220;He told me had a job in Turkey,&'8221; she says, &'8220;and we're going to go for a holiday too, me and him.&'8221; The &'8220;holiday&'8221; got off to a strange start. Instead of heading to a resort or a hotel, the couple flew to Gaziantep, on southern Turkey's border with Syria. A certified copy of Ahmed Khalil's passport shows his birthplace as Kabul in Afghanistan. A man who spoke only Turkish drove them to a house full of men, women and children. The women and children were in one room, the men in another, Mitat says. She was confused, and asked the other women where they were going. &'8220;We're going hijra,&'8221; they explained. To Syria. Hijra was the journey of the Prophet Muhammad and his followers, the fledgling Muslim community, from Mecca to Medina in 622 to escape persecution. In a modern context, it signifies escape from the tyranny of the enemies of Islam to the realm of the faithful. &'8220;When we were in Dubai he told me, 'I have for you a surprise, but I will give it to you in Turkey.' This is the surprise: to go in Syria,&'8221; she says. When she objected, Khalil's response was blunt. &'8220;You are my wife and you have to obey me,&'8221; she says he told her. Mitat says she wanted to tell Turkish border officials about her predicament, but says that as she and the others approached the Syrian border, the guards opened fire so they ran into Syria. When asked about the incident on the border, a Turkish police spokesman said he could not share information about individual cases. Once inside the country, they headed to the nearby town of Jarablus, to a guesthouse for &'8220;muhajarin&'8221; &'8212; those who were making hijra to the so-called caliphate &'' like them. Mitat says the place was packed with people from &'8220;everywhere&'8221; &'8212; the UK, Canada, France, Belgium, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria and Saudi Arabia. No sooner had they arrived, than Khalil was sent off for a month of military training, leaving Mitat, who was now pregnant, behind. Once he'd been trained, ISIS sent Khalil to fight. He was killed on his first day, in the battle of Kobani. After his death, Mitat says she was terrified and didn't know what to do; banned from talking to ordinary Syrians, she was forced to stay within the muhajirin community. She moved in with her husband's brother and his family, who had also traveled to Syria, but when her brother-in-law was killed too, ISIS moved her into a guesthouse, where she stayed until her son, Abdullah, was born. As Kurdish fighters closed in, ISIS told Mitat she had to marry again and get out of the area to safety, so she wed a friend of her first husband, a man known as Abu Talha Al-Almani (his name means &'8220;the German&'8221;). He took her to Manbij, northeast of Aleppo, before moving again, this time to Raqqa as Kurdish forces closed in. A month after they got there, Mitat says she divorced Abu Talha because he wouldn't let her leave the house. She says fear played a major role in her decision not to leave immediately. Islam says she was told that other people who tried to leave had their children taken away, or were forced into weeks of intense Islamic studies. All the while, Mitat was trying to escape with little Abdullah. ISIS did its best to keep her and other muhajarin away from local Syrians who might help them, and smugglers hesitated to help, because they faced execution if caught. Others asked exorbitant fees &'8212; as much as USD $5,000 &'8212; according to Mitat. Eventually ISIS compelled her to marry for a third time, this time to a man who Mitat describes as a gentle soul, called Abu Abdallah Al-Afghani. This name &'' given to him by ISIS &'8212; indicates he was of Afghan origin. Mitat, though, says he was Indian, and that his mother lived in Australia. She says he [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsApr 26th, 2017

ISIS claims responsibility for Palm Sunday church bombings in Egypt – CNN News

Egypt's President says he will declare a state of emergency after two deadly bombings targeted Coptic Christian churches on Palm Sunday. ISIS claimed responsibility for the attacks, which were aimed at a vulnerable religious minority on one of the most important days on the Christian calendar. The death toll rose to at least 49 Monday, state media reported. At least 27 people died in a blast inside a church in the northern city of Tanta, and 78 people were injured, according to Egypt's state-run news agency Al-Ahram. In Alexandria, 18 civilians and four police officers were killed when a suicide bomber blew himself up outside a Coptic church, Al-Ahram said. Egyptian President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi declared three days of nationwide mourning following the bombings and said a three-month state of emergency would come into force once legal and constitutional measures have been completed. In response to the attacks, the country will also form a supreme council to counter terrorism and extremism, Sisi said on state television Sunday after an emergency meeting of the country's National Defense Council. &'8220;We have to pay attention because of Egypt and Egypt's future. We know this is a big sacrifice but we are capable of facing it,&'8221; he said. &'8220;The attack will not undermine the resolve and true will of the Egyptian people to counter the forces of evil, but will only harden their determination to move forward on their trajectory to realize security, stability and comprehensive development,&'8221; the President said in a statement. In a statement issued on the Telegram messaging platform and circulated by several ISIS supporters, the militant group identified the bombers as Egyptian nationals. Egyptian authorities have not confirmed the bombers' nationalities. ISIS warned of more attacks in its statement. &'8220;The Crusaders and their apostate followers must be aware that the bill between us and them is very large, and they will be paying it like a river of blood from their sons, if God is willing,&'8221; the group said in Arabic. The bombings came on the Sunday before Easter, the day that marks the start of Holy Week for Christians. The first blast ripped through a Palm Sunday service at St. George's Church in Tanta, killing at least 27 and wounding 78 others, state TV reported. An explosive device had been planted under a seat in the main prayer hall, it said. News footage from Tanta showed people gathering at the church, singing hymns. The video then quickly switched to bars as harrowing screams and cries echo in the background. &'8220;Everything is destroyed inside the church,&'8221; said Peter Kamel, who saw the aftermath of the bombing. Its marble pillars were covered with blood, he said. Kamel said that most of the injured appeared to be priests and members of the choir. Not long afterward, a suicide bomber attacked outside St. Mark's Coptic Orthodox Cathedral in Alexandria, according to state news outlets. &'8220;Everything is destroyed inside the church,&'8221; said Peter Kamel, who saw the aftermath of the bombing. Its marble pillars were covered with blood, he said. Kamel said that most of the injured appeared to be priests and members of the choir. Not long afterward, a suicide bomber attacked outside St. Mark's Coptic Orthodox Cathedral in Alexandria, according to state news outlets. Police officers who had been posted outside the church stopped a man wearing an explosive belt from entering the church, the Interior Ministry said. Two of those officers, a man and a woman, were killed, along with civilians and other police staff. Egyptian blogger Maged Butter said he saw five or six ambulances and bloodstains 100 meters away from the site of the explosion, which happened near the church gate. He said women were crying and looking for their loved ones and were yelling at police for &'8220;not protecting&'8221; them. &'8220;Every now and then, I see a person crying &'8212; I think they are Christian &'8212; and they keep saying: 'have you seen my family? Have you seen my family?'&'8221; Butter said. Nile and Masriya TV, Egyptian state outlets, aired black banners in the upper left of their newscasts to signify mourning for the victims of both explosions. Fadi Sami heard about the Tanta bombing as he sat in the Alexandria cathedral on Sunday. The head of Egypt's Coptic Church, Pope Tawadros II, was leading Palm Sunday prayers. Though no one announced the Tanta news, Sami said he could hear the sadness in the pope's voice. He left as the pope finished the sermon. Twenty minutes later, a suicide bomber blew himself up at the gate of the church. &'8220;I came back and the area was covered in smoke. The stores around the church were all destroyed,&'8221; he said. &'8220;There were bodies and body parts everywhere, outside and inside the gate. I saw a man put together what was left of his son in a bag.&'8221; Alexandria sits on the Mediterranean and has a large Christian population. Downtown is usually busy but was relatively quiet on Sunday because of the holiday. &'8220;Thank God it is a Sunday, and many shops are closed,&'8221; Butter said. David Saeed said he was sitting in the last row in the church when the bomb went off. &'8220;We were just singing and suddenly in a blink of (an) eye, smoke, fire everywhere. I didn't realize what's happening until I saw blood and organs of our friends scattered over the ground,&'8221; Saeed told CNN. [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsApr 10th, 2017

5 dead in vehicle, knife attack at British Parliament – The Japan News

A knife-wielding man went on a deadly rampage in the heart of Britain’s seat of power Wednesday, plowing a car into pedestrians on London’s Westminster Bridge before stabbing a police officer to death inside the gates of Parliament. Five people were killed, including the assailant, and 40 others were injured in what Prime Minister Theresa May condemned as a “sick and depraved terrorist attack.” Lawmakers, lords, staff and visitors were locked down after the man was shot by police within the perimeter of Parliament, just meters from entrances to the building itself and in the shadow of the iconic Big Ben clock tower. He died, as did three pedestrians on the bridge, and the police officer. A doctor who treated the wounded from the bridge said some had “catastrophic” injuries. Three police officers, several French teenagers on a school trip, two Romanian tourists and five South Korean visitors were among the injured. Police said they were treating the attack as terrorism. There was no immediate claim of responsibility. Metropolitan Police counterterrorism chief Mark Rowley said police believed there was only one attacker, “but it would be foolish to be overconfident early on.” He said an unarmed policeman, three civilians and the attacker died. Forty others, including three police officers, were injured. Islamic extremism was suspected in the attack, Rowley said, adding that authorities believe they know the assailant’s identity but would not reveal it while the investigation was ongoing. The threat level for international terrorism in the U.K. was already listed at severe, meaning an attack was “highly likely.” Speaking outside 10 Downing St. after chairing a meeting of government’s emergency committee, COBRA, May said that level would not change. She said attempts to defeat British values of democracy and freedom through terrorism would fail. “Tomorrow morning, Parliament will meet as normal,” she said. Londoners and visitors “will all move forward together, never giving in to terror and never allowing the voices of hate and evil to drive us apart.” U.S. President Donald Trump was among world leaders offering condolences, and in Paris, the lights of the Eiffel Tower were to be dimmed in solidarity with London. London has been a target for terrorism many times over past decades. Just this weekend, hundreds of armed police took part in an exercise simulating a “marauding” terrorist attack on the River Thames. Wednesday was the anniversary of suicide bombings in the Brussels airport and subway that killed 32 people last year, and the latest events echoed recent vehicle attacks in Berlin and Nice, France. In the House of Commons, legislators were holding a series of votes on pensions when deputy Speaker Lindsay Hoyle announced that the sitting was being suspended and told lawmakers not to leave. Parliament was locked down for several hours, and the adjoining Westminster subway station was shuttered. Conservative lawmaker Tobias Ellwood, whose brother was killed in the Bali terror attack in 2002, performed first aid on the wounded police officer, who later died. About 10 yards away lay the assailant. “I tried to stem the flow of blood and give mouth to mouth while waiting for the medics to arrive but I think he had lost too much blood,” Ellwood said. “He had multiple wounds, under the arm and in the back.” The attack began early Wednesday afternoon as a driver in a gray SUV slammed into pedestrians on the bridge linking Parliament to the south bank of the River Thames. Former Polish foreign minister Radek Sikorski was in a car crossing the bridge when he heard “something like a car hitting metal sheet” and then saw people lying on the pavement. “I saw one person who gave no signs of life. One man was bleeding from his head. I saw five people who were at least seriously injured,” Sikorski told Poland’s TVN24. Ambulances arrived within minutes to treat people who lay scattered along the length of the bridge. One bloodied woman lay surrounded by a scattering of postcards. Police said one injured woman was pulled from the river. The car crashed into railings on the north side of the bridge, less than 200 meters from the entrance to Parliament. As people scattered in panic, witnesses saw a man holding a knife run toward the building. “The whole crowd just surged around the corner by the gates just opposite Big Ben,” said witness Rick Longley. “A guy came past my right shoulder with a big knife and just started plunging it into the policeman. I have never seen anything like that. I just can’t believe what I just saw.” The attacker managed to get past a gate into Parliament’s fenced-in New Palace Yard, a cobbled courtyard in the shadow of the Big Ben clock tower. Daily Mail journalist Quentin Letts said a man in black attacked the police officer before being shot two or three times as he tried to storm into the building. “As this attacker was running towards the entrance two plain-clothed guys with guns shouted at him what sounded like a warning, he ignored it and they shot two or three times and he fell,” Letts told the BBC. The attacker fell to the cobbles just yards from the entrance to 1,000-year-old Westminster Hall, the oldest part of the parliamentary complex, busy with visitors and school groups. Beyond that, a corridor leads to the building’s Central Lobby, flanked by House of Commons and House of [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 23rd, 2017

Sexual assault in Japan: ‘Every girl was a victim’ – Al Jazeera

Tamaka Ogawa was about 10 years old when she was sexually assaulted for the first time. It was a public holiday and she was on the subway. A man standing behind her pulled down the band of her culottes and underwear, touched her bare bottom, then pressed himself against her. She recalls feeling shocked and physically sickened. When she reached home, she repeatedly washed the spot where he had pressed himself against her, although she was conscious of not spending too long in the toilet, in case her family noticed that something was wrong. Some years later, on her first day of senior high school, she was groped on the commute home. After that, the groping and sexual assaults &'' men would often stick their hands inside her underwear &'' became a regular occurrence as she made her way to or from school in her uniform. Each time, she would run away, unsure of what to do. &'8220;I thought of myself as a child,&'8221; she reflects. &'8220;I could not understand that adults were excited by touching me.&'8221; It would be improper to express anger towards an adult, she thought, and she worried about attracting attention. Besides, her parents had never spoken to her about such things and how she ought to handle them. She recalls one incident particularly clearly. She was about 15 and on her way to school. A man began to touch her, putting his hand inside her underwear. He was aggressive and it hurt, she remembers. When the train stopped, she got off. But he grabbed her hand and told her: &'8220;Follow me.&'8221; Ogawa ran away. She believes that people saw what was going on, but nobody helped. She felt ashamed and complicit, she says. &'8220;He seems to have thought that I was pleased with his act,&'8221; the now 36-year-old reflects. &'8220;When I was in high school, every [girl] was a victim,&'8221; says Ogawa. &'8220;[We] didn't think we could do anything about it.&'8221; Today, Ogawa, a writer and cofounder of Press Labo, a small digital content production company in Shimokitazawa, an inner-city Tokyo neighbourhood, often writes about Japan's gender inequality and sexual violence issues. In 2015, she began writing about the country's long-standing problem with groping &'' or chikan, in Japanese &'' often experienced by schoolgirls on public transportation. Many victims stay silent, unable to talk about their experiences in a society which, by many accounts, trivialises this phenomenon. But, in the past two years, that has begun to change as more people speak up against it. Yayoi Matsunaga is one of those people. One morning in late January, the 51-year-old arrived at a coffee shop in the bustling neighbourhood of Shibuya with a suitcase of badges. The round badges, designed to deter gropers, feature illustrations such as a schoolgirl peering angrily from between her legs, or a crowd of stern-looking rabbits and include the messages, &'8220;Groping is a crime&'8221; and &'8220;Don't do it&'8221;. Each comes with a leaflet instructing the wearer to clearly display the badges on their bags, to stand confidently and to be vigilant. Matsunaga began her Osaka-based organisation, Groping Prevention Activities Centre, in 2015 after her friend's daughter was regularly molested while taking the train to school. Takako Tonooka, the pseudonym she has used in interviews with the Japan Times, confided in her mother, and the two tried various solutions to stop the attacks. They bought a stuffed toy which says &'8220;Don't do it&'8221; when pulled. They spoke to the police and the railway authorities, who said they would act if it was the same perpetrator &'' but it never was. Tonooka even wore her school skirt shorter and found that she was harassed less. Matsunaga says trains display posters telling groping victims to be brave and to speak up. Tonooka started practising saying &'8220;Stop it&'8221; and &'8220;No&'8221; at home. She began to confront offenders, who would then angrily deny touching her. Onlookers did not help. Eventually, she and her mother created a label to attach to her bag, which says, &'8220;Groping is a crime. I'm not going to give up&'8221; and features a picture of policemen catching perpetrators. It worked. But the label made Tonooka self-conscious, and Matsunaga says boys teased her. Matsunaga decided that Tonooka should not have to fight on her own, so she came up with an idea to involve others by crowdsourcing ideas for anti-groping badges. &'8220;High school girls are really into this 'kawaii' culture so they had to be cute,&'8221; she says. In November 2015 she launched a crowdfunding campaign that attracted 334 donors and raised 2.12 million yen (about $19,000). Then, she ran a badge design crowdsourcing contest. High school pupils, art school students, and freelance designers &'' many telling her it was the first time they'd thought about the issue &'' submitted 441 designs from which Matsunaga selected five. Her organisation gave away about 500 and three police stations handed out more. She now sells them online, for 410 yen ($3.70) each. From March, 11 department stores will stock them and she's aiming to secure more distributors near train stations. Apart from making the badges more widely available, Matsunaga also wants offenders to see them and think: &'8220;The world is changing, some people have started talking about it.&'8221; By involving students, Matsunaga believes she's encouraging them to talk about this issue from a young age. The badges have had a direct effect. Data collected from 70 students [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 9th, 2017

15 dead in Tanay bus accident

MANILA, Philippines - A school field trip turned into a horrific tragedy yesterday morning in Tanay, Rizal, with at least 15 people killed and 40 college stu.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsFeb 20th, 2017

19 dead in multiple-vehicle collision in Ecuador

QUITO — Authorities say at least 19 people have been killed and more than a dozen injured when a long distance passenger bus collided with an off-duty school.....»»

Category: worldSource:  philstarRelated NewsJan 14th, 2017

At least 19 killed in deadly India hospital fire

At least 19 people were killed Monday when a fire broke out at a leading private hospital in an eastern Indian city, police said, with officials warning the death toll could rise......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsOct 18th, 2016

Nine injured in Houston shooting, suspect killed

CHICAGO: A gunman wearing military attire with Nazi emblems opened fire in Houston just before daybreak, authorities said, wounding nine people before dying in a shootout with police. The shooter was a Houston-area lawyer, the Texas city's police chief Ma.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsSep 27th, 2016

5 killed in Quezon fire

ive people, including fou........»»

Category: newsSource:  manila_shimbunRelated NewsSep 25th, 2016

Families allege murder as Bangladesh fire toll rises

DHAKA: Relatives of workers killed in a fire at a packaging factory in Bangladesh have filed a murder case against the owner, police said on Monday, as the death toll from the disaster rose to 31. Another 12 people are missing after the disaster on Saturd.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsSep 12th, 2016

At least 15 dead in Bangladesh factory fire

At least fifteen people have been killed and 70 injured, many critically, in a huge fire triggered by a boiler explosion at a Bangladeshi packaging factory, officials said Saturday......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsSep 10th, 2016

Hours-long attack on Kabul American university kills 16

Sixteen people were killed after militants stormed the American University of Afghanistan in Kabul, officials said Thursday, in a nearly 10-hour raid that prompted anguished pleas for help from trapped students......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsAug 26th, 2016