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1 million residents to cast votes in GenSan, SouthCot for barangay and SK polls

GENERAL SANTOS CITY (MindaNews / 13 Apr) – Some 1,077,376 residents in this city and South Cotabato province are eligible to cast their votes in the May 14 Barangay and Sangguniang Kabataan (SK) elections. Lawyer Jay Gerada, Commission on Elections (Comelec)-South Cotabato supervisor, said in a media forum that the total number of voters comprise […] The post 1 million residents to cast votes in GenSan, SouthCot for barangay and SK polls appeared first on MindaNews......»»

Category: newsSource: mindanews mindanewsApr 13th, 2018

Senate opens ‘Obamacare’ debate at last but outcome in doubt – ABC News

Prodded by President Donald Trump, a bitterly divided Senate voted, at last, Tuesday to move forward with the Republicans' long-promised legislation to repeal and replace &'8220;Obamacare.&'8221; There was high drama as Sen. John McCain returned to the Capitol for the first time after being diagnosed with brain cancer to cast a decisive &'8220;yes&'8221; vote. The final tally was 51-50, with Vice President Mike Pence, exercising his constitutional prerogative, breaking the tie after two Republicans joined all 48 Democrats in voting &'8220;no.&'8221; When the Senate voted Tuesday evening on the bill's initial amendment, it underscored how hard it will be for the chamber's divided Republicans to pass a sweeping replacement of Obama's law. By 57-43 — including nine GOP defectors — it blocked a wide-ranging proposal by Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell to erase and replace much of the statute. It included language by Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, letting insurers sell cut-rate policies with skimpy coverage, plus an additional $100 billion to help states ease out-of-pocket costs for people losing Medicaid — a provision sought by Midwestern moderates including Rob Portman, R-Ohio. On the day's opening vote to begin debate, and with all senators in their seats and protesters agitating outside and briefly inside the chamber, the vote was held open at length before McCain, 80, entered the chamber. Greeted by cheers, he smiled and dispensed hugs — but with the scars from recent surgery starkly visible on the left side of his face. Despite voting &'8220;yes,&'8221; he took a lecturing tone afterward and hardly saw success assured for the legislation after weeks of misfires, even after Tuesday's victory for Trump and Republican leader Mitch McConnell. &'8220;If this process ends in failure, which seems likely, then let's return to regular order,&'8221; McCain said as he chided Republican leaders for devising the legislation in secret along with the administration and &'8220;springing it on skeptical members.&'8221; &'8220;Stop listening to the bombastic loudmouths on the radio, TV and internet. To hell with them!&'8221; McCain said, raising his voice as he urged senators to reach for the comity of earlier times. At the White House earlier, after senators voted to consider the bill, Trump wasted no time in declaring a win and slamming the Democrats anew. &'8220;I'm very happy to announce that, with zero of the Democrats' votes, the motion to proceed on health care has just passed. And now we move forward toward truly great health care for the American people,&'8221; Trump said. &'8220;This was a big step. I want to thank Senator John McCain — very brave man.&'8221; Trump continued to celebrate the vote at a rally in Youngstown, Ohio that doubled as a victory lap. &'8220;We're now one step closer to liberating our citizens from this &'8220;Obamacare&'8221; nightmare and delivering great health care for the American people&'8221; he said. At its most basic, the Republican legislation is aimed at undoing &'8220;Obamacare&'8221;'s unpopular mandates for most people to carry insurance and businesses to offer it. The GOP would repeal &'8220;Obamacare&'8221; taxes and unwind an expansion of the Medicaid program for the poor, the disabled and nursing home residents The result would be 20 million to 30 million people losing insurance over a decade, depending on the version of the bill. The GOP legislation has polled abysmally, while &'8220;Obamacare&'8221; itself has grown steadily more popular. Yet most Republicans argue that failing to deliver on their promises to pass repeal-and-replace legislation would be worse than passing an unpopular bill, because it would expose the GOP as unable to govern despite controlling majorities in the House, Senate and White House. Tuesday's vote amounted to a procedural hurdle for legislation whose final form is impossible to predict under the Senate's byzantine amendment process, which will unfold over the next several days. Indeed senators had no clear idea of what they would ultimately be voting on, and in an indication of the uncertainty ahead, McConnell, R-Ky., said the Senate will &'8220;let the voting take us where it will.&'8221; The expectation is that he will bring up a series of amendments. Yet after seven years of empty promises, and weeks of hand-wringing and false starts on Capitol Hill, it was the Senate's first concrete step toward delivering on innumerable pledges to undo former President Barack Obama's law. It came after several near-death experiences for earlier versions of the legislation, and only after Trump summoned senators to the White House last week to order them to try again after McConnell had essentially conceded defeat. &'8220;The people who sent us here expect us to begin this debate, to have the courage to tackle the tough issues,&'8221; McConnell said ahead of the vote. Democrats stood implacably opposed, and in an unusual maneuver they sat in their seats refusing to vote until it was clear Republicans would be able to reach the 50-vote margin needed to get them over the top with Pence's help. &'8220;Turn back,&'8221; Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of New York implored his GOP colleagues before the vote. &'8220;Turn back now, before it's too late and millions and millions and millions of Americans are hurt so badly.&'8221; Schumer's pleas fell on deaf ears, as several GOP senators who'd announced they would oppose moving forward with the legislation reversed themselves to vote &'8220;yes.&'8221; Among them were Dean Heller of Nevada, the most vulnerable Republican senator in next year's midterm elections, Shelley Moore Capito of West Virginia and Ron Johnson of Wisconsin. Johnson has recently accused McConnell of [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsJul 26th, 2017

SouthCot worried over ‘areas of concern’ for upcoming polls

GENERAL SANTOS CITY (MindaNews / 13 Apr) – Authorities are closely monitoring the boundary areas of this city and South Cotabato province due to potential security problems that might disrupt the conduct of the upcoming Barangay and Sangguniang Kabataan (SK) elections. Lawyer Jay Gerada, Commission on Elections (Comelec)-South Cotabato supervisor, said Thursday they have identified […] The post SouthCot worried over ‘areas of concern’ for upcoming polls appeared first on MindaNews......»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsApr 14th, 2018

More than 4.755 million voters in WV for brgy polls

A TOTAL of 4,475,949 regular voters in Western Visayas have registered for the upcoming barangay and SangguniangKabataan (SK) elections on May 14, 2018, according to the Commission on Elections (Comelec-6). Negros Occidental has the highest number of registered voters with 1,768,087 followed by Iloilo with 1,413,246. Capiz has 479,999; Aklan, 361,354; Antique, 342,251; and Guimaras, […] The post More than 4.755 million voters in WV for brgy polls appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsApr 8th, 2018

P1.5 M ‘shabu’ seized in Roxas City drug sting

A COUPLE and a 17-year old boy were arrested after more or less P1.5 million worth of suspected shabu were seized from their possession. Florencio Abalayan, 37, and his live-in partner Cherry Jardeleza, 34, both residents of Barangay Tiza, Roxas City, Capiz; and Mac-Mac  (not his real name) of Barangay Mongpong, Roxas City, were arrested […] The post P1.5 M ‘shabu’ seized in Roxas City drug sting appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsMar 3rd, 2018

1.4 million voters in Iloilo for barangay, SK polls

MORE THAN 1.4 million voters from Iloilo City and province have registered for the barangay and Sangguniang Kabataan (SK) polls on May 14, 2018. Commission on Elections (Comelec-Iloilo) Supervisor Elizabeth Doronila said 1.413 million are regular voters, including 480,000 SK voters. “The SK voters are those who are 15 to 30 years old on the […] The post 1.4 million voters in Iloilo for barangay, SK polls appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsFeb 28th, 2018

‘A Fulfillment of a Dream’: Davide Inaugurates Argao Town’s New P70M Hospital

It is a happy development for south Cebu residents under the second district after the inauguration of the new Isidro C. Kintanar Memorial Hospital (ICKMH) in Argao last Tuesday. Nestled in a new sprawling site in Barangay Bogo, the P70-million facility will raise the hospital’s bed capacity from 25 to 100 patients once it is […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsFeb 5th, 2018

Marawi residents get DTI assistance

People displaced by last year’s Marawi City siege received livelihood packages and zero-percent-interest microfinance loans worth P2.19 million from the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) to help them rebuild their lives and communities. At the recent DTI Negosyo Seminar Para sa Marawi in the city’s Barangay Sagonsongan, Trade Secretary Ramon Lopez turned over the [...] The post Marawi residents get DTI assistance appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsFeb 2nd, 2018

Polls open in uncertain Chile vote

SANTIAGO, Chile – Chileans voted Sunday, December 17, in a presidential run-off election but the outcome of Sebastian Pinera's comeback bid is far from certain after an unexpected surge from the left. About 14 million people are eligible to cast ballots at more than 43,000 polling stations which opened at 8 am local time ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsDec 17th, 2017

As Olympics near, South Korea agonizes over post-Games costs

By Kim Tong-Hyung, Associated Press GANGNEUNG, South Korea (AP) — South Korean officials have ruled out turning a state-of-the-art Olympic skating arena into a giant seafood freezer. Other than that, not much is certain about the country's post-Winter Games plans for a host of expensive venues. As officials prepare for the games in and around the small mountain town of Pyeongchang, there are lingering worries over the huge financial burden facing one of the nation's poorest regions. Local officials hope that the Games will provide a badly needed economic boost by marking the area as a world-class tourist destination. But past experience shows that hosts who justified their Olympics with expectations of financial windfalls were often left deeply disappointed when the fanfare ended. This isn't lost on Gangwon province, which governs Pyeongchang and nearby Gangneung, a seaside city that will host Olympic skating and hockey events. Officials there are trying hard to persuade the national government to pay to maintain new stadiums that will have little use once the athletes leave. Seoul, however, is so far balking at the idea. The Olympics, which begin Feb. 9, will cost South Korea about 14 trillion won ($12.9 billion), much more than the 8 to 9 trillion won ($7 to 8 billion) the country projected as the overall cost when Pyeongchang won the bid in 2011. Worries over costs have cast a shadow over the games among residents long frustrated with what they say were decades of neglect in a region that doesn't have much going on other than domestic tourism and fisheries. "What good will a nicely managed global event really do for residents when we are struggling so much to make ends meet?" said Lee Do-sung, a Gangneung restaurant owner. "What will the games even leave? Maybe only debt." ___ TEARING THINGS DOWN The atmosphere was starkly different three decades ago when grand preparations for the 1988 Seoul Summer Games essentially shaped the capital into the modern metropolis it is today. A massive sports complex and huge public parks emerged alongside the city's Han River. Next came new highways, bridges and subway lines. Forests of high-rise buildings rose above the bulldozed ruins of old commercial districts and slums. The legacy of the country's second Olympics will be less clear. In a country that cares much less now about the recognition that large sporting events bring, it will potentially be remembered more for things dismantled than built. Pyeongchang's picturesque Olympic Stadium — a pentagonal 35,000-seat arena that sits in a county of 40,000 people — will only be used for the opening and closing ceremonies of the Olympics and Paralympics before workers tear it down. A scenic downhill course in nearby Jeongseon will also be demolished after the games to restore the area to its natural state. Fierce criticism by environmentalists over the venue being built on a pristine forest sacred to locals caused construction delays that nearly forced pre-Olympic test events to be postponed. Gangwon officials want the national government to share costs for rebuilding the forest, which could be as much as 102 billion won ($95 million). ___ NO FISH Despite more than a decade of planning, Gangwon remains unsure what to do with the Olympic facilities it will keep. Winter sports facilities are often harder to maintain than summer ones because of the higher costs for maintaining ice and snow and the usually smaller number of people they attract. That's especially true in South Korea, which doesn't have a strong winter sports culture. Not all ideas are welcome. Gangwon officials say they never seriously considered a proposal to convert the 8,000-seat Gangneung Oval, the Olympic speed skating venue, into a refrigerated warehouse for seafood. Officials were unwilling to have frozen fish as part of their Olympic legacy. Gangwon officials also dismissed a theme park developer's suggestion to make the stadium a gambling venue where people place bets on skating races, citing the country's strict laws and largely negative view of gambling. A plan to have the 10,000-capacity Gangneung Hockey Center host a corporate league hockey team fell apart. Even worse off are Pyeongchang's bobsleigh track, ski jump hill and the biathlon and cross-country skiing venues, which were built for sports South Koreans are largely uninterested in. After its final inspection visit in August, the International Olympic Committee warned Pyeongchang's organizers that they risked creating white elephants from Olympic venues, though it didn't offer specific suggestions for what to do differently. Cautionary tales come from Athens, which was left with a slew of abandoned stadiums after the 2004 Summer Games that some say contributed to Greece's financial meltdown and Nagano, the Japanese town that never got the tourism bump it expected after spending an estimated $10.5 billion for the 1998 Winter Games. Some Olympic venues have proved to be too costly to maintain. The $100 million luge and bobsled track built in Turin for the 2006 games was later dismantled because of high operating costs. Pyeongchang will be only the second Olympic host to dismantle its ceremonial Olympic Stadium immediately after the games — the 1992 Winter Olympics host Albertville did so as well. ___ 'MONEY-DRINKING HIPPOS' Gangwon has demanded that the national government in Seoul pay for maintaining at least four Olympic facilities after the Games — the speed skating arena, hockey center, bobsleigh track and ski jump hill. This would save the province about 6 billion won ($5.5 million) a year, according to Park Cheol-sin, a Gangwon official. But the national government says doing so would be unfair to other South Korean cities that struggled financially after hosting large sports events. Incheon, the indebted 2014 Asian Games host, has a slew of unused stadiums now mocked as "money-drinking hippos." It would also be a hard sell to taxpayers outside of Gangwon, said Lee Jae-soon, an official from the Ministry of Culture, Sports and Tourism. Unlike the 1988 Olympics and the 2002 World Cup, which were brought to South Korea after bids driven by the national government, the provincial government led the bid for the Pyeongchang games and it did so without any commitment from Seoul over footing the bill. Under current plans, Gangwon will be managing at least six Olympic facilities after the games. These facilities will create a 9.2 billion won ($8.5 million) deficit for the province every year, a sizable burden for a quickly-aging region that had the lowest income level among South Korean provinces in 2013, according to the Korea Industrial Strategy Institute, which was commissioned by Gangwon to analyze costs. Hong Jin-won, a Gangneung resident and activist who has been monitoring Olympic preparations for years, said the real deficit could be even bigger. The institute's calculation is based on assumptions that each facility would generate at least moderate levels of income, which Hong says is no sure thing. He said that could mean welfare spending gets slashed to help make up the lack of money. South Korea, a rapidly-aging country with a worsening job market and widening rich-poor gap, has by far the highest elderly poverty rate among rich nations, according to Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development figures. If Seoul doesn't pay for the Olympic facilities, and Gangwon can't turn them into cultural or leisure facilities, it might make more sense for Gangwon to just tear them down. Park said the national government must step up because the "Olympics are a national event, not a Gangwon event.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 15th, 2017

GenSan offers free dialysis for poor patients

GENERAL SANTOS CITY (MindaNews / 27 Sept) – Poor residents here who are suffering from kidney failure or end-stage renal disease may now avail of free dialysis treatment courtesy of the city government. This, as the local government-run Dr. Jorge P. Royeca Hospital finally opened its P26-million Renal Care and Treatment Unit, which is touted [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsSep 27th, 2017

House committee votes to reset barangay, youth polls in Oct to May 2018

House committee votes to reset barangay, youth polls in Oct to May 2018.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsAug 14th, 2017

GenSan LGU allots P5 million for Marawi ‘bakwits’

GENERAL SANTOS CITY (MindaNews / 15 June) – The city government has allocated some P5 million to augment the relief operations for residents who were displaced by the continuing conflict in Marawi City. Mayor Ronnel Rivera said the release of the assistance was endorsed in a recent meeting by the City Disaster Risk Reduction and [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsJun 15th, 2017

2 M register for SK, barangay polls

MANILA, Philippines - Over two million youth and new voters have registered for the barangay and Sangguniang Kabataan (SK) elections this October, the Commis.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsApr 8th, 2017

Lenin Moreno headed for victory amid opposition fraud claims – The Guardian

Ecuador’s ruling party candidate appeared to be heading for victory in a presidential run-off that would cement the country’s reputation as a bastion of the Latin American left and provide breathing space for Wikileaks founder Julian Assange. However, the narrow 51% to 49% lead for Lenin Moreno was contested by the opposition candidate Guillermo Lasso, prompting fears for heightened political tension in the days ahead. With 96% of votes counted on Sunday night, Moreno, who was a former vice-president under outgoing president Rafael Correa, seemed to be on course to beat Lasso, a 61-year-old former banker. The head of Ecuador’s electoral council, Juan Pablo Pozo, called on the opposition candidate to recognise the results. “Ecuador deserves the ethical responsibility from its political actors to recognise the democratic decision made by the people at the ballot box,” Pozo said. However, Lasso, who earlier had claimed victory based on three exit polls that showed him leading by as much as six points, pointed to irregularities and demanded a recount. “This is very sickening. We’re not going to allow it,” he said, calling on supporters to protest the results peacefully but firmly. “They’ve crossed a line, which is pretending to abuse the people’s will” and install an “illegitimate” government, Lasso said. Several thousand of his supporters picketed the electoral council headquarters on Sunday night chanting: “We don’t want fraud, we want democracy.” Meanwhile, Moreno appeared on a stage flanked by outgoing president Rafael Correa and Jorge Glas, the vice-president, as thousands of supporters waved flags in the lime-green colours of the Alianza País coalition and cumbia music blasted into the night. Moreno called for dialogue with the opposition, saying: “We know how to hear the criticisms. Let’s work together in peace and harmony. Dancing in the crowd, Marisol Jaramillo, 34, an agricultural worker said “Now the revolution will continue, life has changed for us over the last 10 years and want the progress to carry on.” For the country’s 15 million population, at stake was whether to continue the redistributive policies of the ruling party, which won the previous three elections under Rafael Correa, including reduced poverty and improved access to education and healthcare. Correa’s administration had also been criticised for media censorship, corruption and abandoning many of its environmental promises. The alternative offered by Lasso was a pro-business, pro-austerity programme that promised tax cuts and more jobs, though Lasso was plagued with accusations of tax avoidance through dozens of offshore accounts. He also promised to ask Assange to leave the Ecuadorean embassy in London within a month of securing a mandate because he said the asylum granted to the WikiLeaks founder was posing a burden on the country’s taxpayers. Assange is reportedly sufficiently concerned to have instructed lawyers in Quito in case Lasso wins. The election will also have regional ramifications. Should a Moreno victory be confirmed, it would cement Ecuador’s reputation as a bastion of the left in Latin America. Should he lose, it will be taken as another sign of the region’s retreating “pink wave”, following defeats for the left in an Argentinian election and a Bolivian referendum, plus the impeachment and ousting of Workers’ party president Dilma Rousseff in Brazil. With the stakes high in Ecuador, there were accusations of vote-rigging and other dubious practices during the first round, which was delayed because the result was close, though independent observers from the Union of South American Nations said there was no evidence of fraud and praised the election process as transparent. The foreign minister, Guillaume Long, urged all involved not to discredit the process for political reasons. “It’s important that all sides accept the results that will be issued by the electoral authorities and show their democratic commitment without throwing around other false allegations or claiming that any defeat is due to irregularities,” he told the Guardian. Earlier in the day, Moreno voted at a polling station in the middle-class Rumipampa neighbourhood of Quito, while his supporters gathered outside chanting: “You can see it, you can feel it, Lenin president.” Moreno called for the election to be peaceful process. “Let the people make their decision,” he said. As police formed a cordon to hold back the throng, voters – many of them supporters of opposition candidate Guillermo Lasso – protested that they could not enter the polling station to vote, as Moreno sympathisers jeered. “I voted for Lasso, I voted for a change,” Maria Jose Maldonado, 33, a business administrator told the Guardian. “We don’t want a dictatorship we don’t want our freedom taken away, we don’t want to be like Venezuela,” she said, alluding to the move by the supreme court in Caracas to take over legislative powers in the opposition-controlled Venezuelan congress last week. Casting his vote in Ecuador’s port city of Guayaquil, Lasso said: “This is a crucial day, this isn’t any election, here there’s a path; there’s a path to Venezuela or a path to democracy and freedom.” At the polling station in Quito where Moreno voted, Nora Molina, 57, said she voted for him because “we have made a lot of progress in the last 10 years and we want it to continue”. Voting with her young children, Patricia Romero, 37, said she backed Moreno: “I would like him to continue with the revolution which has helped us and he is genuinely concerned for the people.” Carlos Muso, a 54-year-old taxi driver, said he [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsApr 3rd, 2017

Tensions rising between Turkish, European leaders before elections – CNN News

Turkey and the Netherlands' diplomatic feud deepened Sunday with the Turkish president accusing the NATO ally of fascism, and declaring the Dutch would &'8220;pay the price&'8221; for harming relations. The Danish Prime Minister also entered the fray, saying he couldn't host a yet-to-be scheduled visit by his Turkish counterpart in light of &'8220;current rhetorical attacks&'8221; against the Dutch. Upcoming votes in Turkey and the Netherlands serve as a backdrop for the dispute: In Turkey, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, who has cracked down on opposition &'8212; particularly journalists, academics and the public service sector &'8212; since a July coup attempt, is pushing an April referendum that would expand his powers. In the Netherlands, this week's general elections will pit a hardline anti-Islam candidate in a tight race against the incumbent prime minister. Erdogan is keen to rally the roughly 4.6 million expatriate Turks living in Western Europe, many of whom will be permitted to vote in the Turkish referendum. Following similar moves in Germany, Austria and Switzerland, the Netherlands on Saturday barred a plane carrying Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu from entering the country, citing security concerns. Cavusoglu sought to address expats in support of the Turkish referendum. The Dutch also stopped Turkey's family affairs minister from entering the Turkish consulate in Rotterdam. Protests broke out in both countries, and Erdogan responded by saying the Netherlands is &'8220;sacrificing Turkish-Dutch relations&'8221; and accused the country &'8212; which lost more than 200,000 of its citizens during Germany's World War II occupation &'8212; of Nazism. Rotterdam, where Cavusoglu hoped to speak, was especially hard hit by the Nazis. Next month, Turkish voters will cast ballots in a constitutional referendum that could change their government structure. If passed, it would transform the country's parliamentary system into a presidential one, effectively consolidating the power of three legislative bodies into one executive branch under Erdogan. Critics call the move anti-democratic and say it's indicative of Erdogan's drift toward authoritarian rule since the coup attempt eight months ago. Erdogan and his Justice and Development Party, or AKP, ministers have said those who oppose it stand with the coup plotters and terrorists. Cavusoglu has promised tenfold retaliation against the Netherlands, while Erdogan has likened the country to a &'8220;banana republic&'8221; and called for sanctions, according to the state-run Anadolu Agency. A Turkish diplomatic source told Anadolu that Dutch diplomatic missions in Ankara and Istanbul had been closed off due to security concerns. Meanwhile, the agency reported, the Turkish Foreign Ministry has told the Dutch ambassador, who is presently on leave out of the country, he need &'8220;not return for a while.&'8221; The Netherlands isn't the first nation Erdogan has accused of Nazism. Germany, too, became a target of Erdogan's Nazi comparisons after canceling Turkish rallies on its soil this month. Some 1.5 million Turkish nationals living in Germany are eligible to vote in the referendum, according to Anadolu. &'8220;I thought Nazism was over but I was wrong,&'8221; Erdogan said at the International Goodness Awards in Istanbul on Sunday. &'8220;What we saw in the last couple of days in Germany and Netherlands are the reflections of Islamophobia.&'8221; Turkey is overwhelmingly Sunni Muslim. Chancellor Angela Merkel issued a sharp rebuke, saying such comparisons serve only to belittle Nazi crimes. German-Turkish relations have been on a downslide of late. Among the incidents chipping away at the countries' security and economic partnership was last month's arrest of Die Welt journalist Deniz Yucel on terrorism charges, and Turkey bristled last year when Germany's parliament declared the 1915 massacre of hundreds of thousands of Armenians &'8220;genocide.&'8221; European governments have been especially critical of Erdogan's commitment to basic freedoms since the coup. The country jailed more journalists than any other country in 2016, according to the Committee to Protect Journalists. Also, nearly 140 media outlets have been shuttered, more than 41,000 people have been arrested and about 100,000 workers have been dismissed from public service positions. Facebook, YouTube, Twitter interrupted during uprising Affording Turkey some leverage in the international spat is its key role in a Syrian migrant deal in which Turkey will resettle one refugee for every refugee resettled in Europe. In November, responding to European Union freezing EU membership talks with Turkey, Erdogan threatened, &'8220;If you go too far, the border gates will be opened,&'8221; according to Anadolu. Amid Sunday's diplomatic turmoil, Danish Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen postponed a yet-to-be-scheduled visit from his Turkish counterpart. &'8220;Under normal circumstances it would be a pleasure for me to greet Prime Minister (Binali) Yildirim in Copenhagen,&'8221; Rasmussen said. &'8220;But with the current rhetorical attacks by Turkey against the Netherlands, a new meeting cannot be seen isolated from that.&'8221; The Danish government is observing developments in Turkey &'8220;with great concern as democratic principles are under considerable pressure,&'8221; he said. &'8220;A meeting right now would be interpreted as if Denmark is viewing developments in Turkey more mildly, which is not at all the case.&'8221; The prime minister's office said Danish representatives and Turkish officials had been discussing the possible meeting for several weeks. It would have been scheduled for later this month in Denmark. In the Netherlands, far-right politician Geert Wilders praised the decision to bar the Turkish minister from entering the country and credited his own party for the decision. The Netherlands is heading for a nationwide vote Wednesday, with concerns about Muslim immigration a central issue. Riding a populist wave that ushered Donald Trump into the [&'].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanaoexaminerRelated NewsMar 13th, 2017

What the numbers say

Some people make the mistake of claiming that President Rodrigo Duterte won by a landslide. He did not. He simply topped the race against four other candidates, with 16-million votes, representing 39 percent of the total votes cast. This is called a plurality......»»

Category: newsSource:  thestandardRelated NewsJan 6th, 2017

Comelec deactivates 2 million voters for barangay, SK polls

MANILA, Philippines - About two million voters may not be able to vote in next year’s barangay and Sangguniang Kabataan elections......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 10th, 2016

5 M more expected to register for barangay, SK polls

MANILA, Philippines – The Commission on Elections (Comelec) expects five million more voters will register for the barangay and Sangguniang Kabataan (SK) pol.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 14th, 2016

Comelec saves PHP250-M for the procurement of paper rolls for official ballots in the Oct. 31 Barangay and SK polls

By Ferdinand G. Patinio, Philippine News Agency MANILA, Aug. 21 &'8212; The Commission on Elections (Comelec) was able to save an estimated PHP250 million for the procurement of the paper rolls to be used as official ballots in the forthcoming Barangay an.....»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsAug 21st, 2016

Comelec starts the printing of ballots for the Barangay, SK polls

MANILA -- The Commission on Elections (Comelec) started on Sunday the printing of 85 million ballots to be used in the Oct. 31, 2016 Barangay and Sangguniang Kabataan (SK) polls......»»

Category: newsSource:  mb.com.phRelated NewsAug 21st, 2016