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'GoldenDinagyang food aid program eyes 10,000 kids

By: Isabella Marie A. Zerrudo ON ITS 8th year, Philippine Red Cross (PRC) Iloilo Chapter, along with Iloilo Dinagyang Foundation Inc. (IDFI) and the Rotary Club of Metro Iloilo, aims to feed 10,000 schoolchildren through the Dinagyang Food Aid Program starting Jan 11, 2017. “We are expecting around 9,000 to 10,000 public schoolchildren for this year […] The post #GoldenDinagyang food aid program eyes 10,000 kids appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource: thedailyguardian thedailyguardianJan 12th, 2018

PVL: Tiamzon gets late birthday surprise

A group of kids with their parents and guardians clad in black shirts trooped the FilOil Flying V Centre in San Juan on Sunday. BanKo’s open hitter Nicole Tiamzon got a late birthday surprise when she marched onto the court for the Perlas Spikers’ match against Adamson-Akari as the group cheered her on when her name was called for the starting lineup. The kids on the rafters were actually Tiamzon’s Spike and Serve volleyball program students who came all the way from Taytay, Rizal to watch their mentor play in the Premier Volleyball League Season 2 Open Conference.    “I didn’t know na pupunta sila kasi yesterday I celebrated my birthday with them. Sinurprise nila ako and everything and ngayon paglabas ko ng dugout nand’yan silang lahat ibig sabihin suportado ng mga magulang yung gusto ng mga bata,” said Tiamzon, who celebrated her 23rd birthday on Saturday. Tiamzon played inspired volleyball as she finished with 10 points in BanKo’s 25-17, 25-17, 25-18, win over the Lady Falcons that hiked the Perlas Spikers’ record to 7-2. “May halong kaba siyempre you don’t want to disappoint the kids. They see you on TV naman pero this is the first time they went here na manonood tapos naka-suit up ako, naka-Perlas ako,” she said. “Sa tv lang nila nakikita ‘yun noong una.” “May halong kaba pero hindi naman ako magpapaano kasi yun nga inspirasyon ka ng mga bata. You have to be a role model sa kanila and masaya ako kasi nakababa sila tapos nakita nila yung Perlas,” Tiamzon added. Spike and Serve is Tiamzon’s non-profit organization for kids. “Sila ‘yung mga bata na kinuha namin sa program namin for one year sa Taytay. Mga public school students sila ages 8-11,” explained Tiamzon. “We got them since March and then, until June next year nasa amin sila.” “Kumbaga ang program is Spike and Serve, grass roots development program, we cater students, teachers and parents,” she added. Tiamzon was thankful and appreciated the surprise but what gave her joy was seeing the kids’ eyes light up watching the game live. “I don’t know if makita niyo ‘yung face ng mga bata kanina nu’ng nakatapak sila sa taraflex na magandang gym, ilaw and everything,” said Tiamzon. “’Yun ‘yung mga kasiyahan ng mga bata ngayon and maybe it can be a start for them to dream di ba?”     --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @fromtheriles  .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsNov 4th, 2018

Sub Pop relaunches its legendary Singles Club

Sub Pop Records is appealing to a new generation of "record nerds" with the relaunch of its vinyl subscription program, which got its start featuring singles by era-defining artists of the late 1980s and early-1990s such as Nirvana and Sonic Youth. The first edition of the Singles Club coincided with the launch of the Seattle-based label, featuring 75 artists in all, including Soundgarden, Fugazi and L7. The Club's second and third editions ran from 1998 to 2002 and from 2008 to 2009 respectively, together featuring artists including Iron and Wine, Bright Eyes, The White Stripes, Death Cab for Cutie, Jesus and Mary Chain, The Get Up Kids and Thee Oh Sees. Now, as Sub Pop cel...Keep on reading: Sub Pop relaunches its legendary Singles Club.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 4th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

From Italian ‘porchetta’ to La Tasca ‘bibingka’: Christmas gift list

I am forever on the lookout for food gifts. The stuff I look for must be unique, but not necessarily expensive. And, of course, I want the recipient to close his eyes in satisfaction as he bites into it.   My Christmas list:   Chef Judy's Chiffonelle Cake. It's a light caramel cake with a tinge of lemon. Simple but simply delicious. It's my latest discovery. Tel. 09178975839     Casa Daza Empanadas. I don't usually like promoting my products, but I'll make an exception for these. They're that good. Best kaliskis empanada for me. Original or chicken---for me, the original has a slight edge. Tel. 7202290 or 09171490021   Bottled Gourm...Keep on reading: From Italian ‘porchetta’ to La Tasca ‘bibingka’: Christmas gift list.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated News5 hr. 25 min. ago

Mandatory ROTC bill violates laws protecting kids

President Rodrigo Duterte's proposal to require senior high school students to complete a two-year military training course would violate domestic laws and international agreements protecting minors from being involved in warfare, a group of military reservists from the University of the Philippines said on Monday. At the hearing of the House committee on basic education and culture, UP Vanguard chair Gilbert Reyes said while they support the President's plan to revive the Reserve Officers Training Corps (ROTC) program, only students at least 18 years old should be covered by the mandatory training. New military system Reyes, a lawyer, said House Bill No. 5113 authored by House ...Keep on reading: Mandatory ROTC bill violates laws protecting kids.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 10th, 2018

Longtime friends James, Wade prepare for last meeting as opponents

By Shaun Powell, NBA.com LOS ANGELES — Friendships are never formed totally by choice, because fate demands a say-so in the process by creating the time and the place and in the curious case of LeBron James and Dwyane Wade, the basketball court. It was in Chicago, June of 2003, site of the NBA’s annual draft combine, the meet market for young players gathered to someday change the game, when Wade and LeBron had each other at wassup. In some ways, it was an unlikely pairing: Teenaged phenom from Akron, Ohio, fresh from the cover of Sports Illustrated and the high school prom who already had a national following; and an overlooked underdog from the Chicago suburbs who only became an acquired basketball taste weeks earlier after a searing run through the NCAA tournament. That day, Wade and LeBron went through the checkup lines for height and weight, vertical leap and whatever else the combines put rookies through and then during a break came the only measurement that counted, when one future Hall of Famer sized up the other. LeBron said: “Some things you can’t explain. Sometimes it’s just chemistry.” Wade said: “When you’re young and coming into the league, you find guys you have something in common with, then you continue to link and that’s what we did. It’s organic how we built this friendship.” Some 15 years later, the bond will endure, likely forever. The basketball part, however, ends Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time) after the game when Wade, who’s calling it a career after this season, peels off his sweat-soaked Heat jersey and swaps it for a Laker top belonging to LeBron. It might qualify as the best trade of the NBA season, or at least the most emotional. "It's sweet and sour,” said LeBron, anticipating the moment at Staples Center. “The sweet part about it is I've always loved being on the same floor with my brother. And the sour part about it is that this is our last time sharing the same court.” Brother? How many folks with different blood can call each other that? True friendship is answering the phone at 3 a.m. instead of letting it ring, and reaching for the tab with longer arms, and above all, becoming a mattress when the other guy falls. Those tests were aced throughout the LeBron-Wade bromance that stretched through two Olympic teams, four years in Miami, two NBA championships and even 46 games in Cleveland together but of course was always put on hold whenever they were on opposite benches. This is best placed into proper context by Gabrielle Union, the actress and wife of Wade, who says ever so delicately about her husband in those friend vs. friend moments: “He wants to kill him. Drop three-balls on him.” Perhaps so, because as Wade says, “you always want to beat your best friend,” yet their competitive spirit is confined within the baselines and between the jump ball and buzzer. Then the teasing and bragging rights begin by text or call, almost instantly. This arrangement irked the old-school basketball culture, long cringing at the chummy ways of a new generation, believing that most if not all interaction should cease until the offseason, or even better, when careers are done. Wade and LeBron then turned up the volume on that subject when they linked up as teammates with the Heat in 2010, angering the purists and creating, at least initially, a team to be despised as well as respected. Not that Wade and LeBron regret that experience at all, or the noise that followed; this was, as Union observed, “far bigger than basketball.” The chance to be neighbors and watch their kids grow up together and celebrate championships on South Beach until well past sunrise was a priceless part of the bonding process, something neither will be able to duplicate as they begin a new phase of their relationship. The chance to let their hair down (well, Wade anyway) and loosen up, away from the crowds and the media, is something they could keep to themselves. Although: Mrs.Wade spilled a few friendship secrets the other day, with an ohmigod and a roll of the eyes. “They laugh a lot,” she said. “LeBron is silly. Dwyane is silly. They’re silly and goofy together. When they’re around each other it’s like a never-ending sleepover. That’s what it feels like when you’re in their orbit. They have an unspoken language and jokes and it’s like a show and everyone’s watching.” It helped that, in addition to being in the same sport, both LeBron and Wade became all-time greats, because like-minded and like-talented people tend to magnetize. It was LeBron who collected MVP awards and a huge social media flock at first, then Wade followed up by winning a championship first, and this created a mutual respect for each other’s abilities. It also allowed them to walk through the same exclusive doors together, for example, making a pair of Olympic teams and a batch of All-Star Games, therefore putting them in close company even before the Heat experience. From those moments, a relationship tightened. And when life threw airballs in their direction, one was there to help the other. “When I was going through the custody of my kids and that battle, he was someone I talked to constantly and told him what I was going through,” said Wade. “And vice versa, when he was going through things family-wise, I could talk to him and try to relate. You lean on guys who have similar stories and have gone through similar things in their lives to help with advice or just be there to listen.” Curiously, one of their few awkward moments happened when they became teammates in Miami initially. The transition, Wade admitted, was friction-free but not totally smooth. Superstars have egos. Adjustments were needed and were done and this was made possible by LeBron’s game, which is built on unselfish play. “It would’ve been easier if we went to a neutral site,” Wade said. “But because he came to Miami, it was my team before he got there. It was a little hard because of that, but once we got through the first year it was easy. He can play with anybody. He can go out and score or he can get 17 points and 20 assists. He knows if a guy hasn’t shot the ball in a while and how to get him going.” Their on-court chemistry was astonishing to witness at times, the best entertainment in basketball back then. They knew each other’s tendencies, spots on the floor and how to mesh. How many times did Wade toss a lob to a streaking LeBron for a dunk, or vice-versa? Along with Chris Bosh, this was one of the most productive link-ups in NBA history. Four years and four trips to the NBA Finals don’t lie. And true friendship is following your pal to Cleveland in winter, as Wade did last year in an awkward attempt to re-create the past. To this, Wade shook his head and laughed: “Yeah, yeah, you right about that.” While Wade is putting a bow on this retirement season, he marvels at his friend’s staying power and salutes LeBron’s decision to sign up with the Lakers and take on Los Angeles. “I think it’s great, something he wanted to do,” Wade said. “For a player to be able to map out his career the way he has been able to do, he’s doing it his way. This is the way he wanted, to end it here in L.A., on and off the court. His career is not over, but this is the last layer of his career.” And LeBron, reflecting on Wade’s NBA imprint, said: “D-Wade has definitely had a helluva career, obviously. A first-ballot Hall of Famer, a three-time champion and so on and so on. I mean, it speaks for itself. But what he's done for that franchise and what he's done for that community since he's been drafted has been a pretty good story.” This is curious timing, how the NBA schedule has Wade making his last trip to Los Angeles and against LeBron not long after Wade and Union, who have a home in L.A., recently welcomed a newborn daughter. The families spent Sunday (Monday, PHL time) together at the baby shower, then the farewell game tips 24 hours later. Union calls it the “end of a basketball brotherhood but the beginning of a real friendship with basketball gone” and Wade agrees. “When we first came into the league people couldn’t understand how we could be friends during the season," Wade said. "When I was in Cleveland for a game I’d go to his house the night before, we’d go to the movies and hang out and then we’d go at each other in the game. We’d laugh about that. We enjoy having a different relationship than what was done before us, but then going out and playing against him, I’d always want to whup his you-know-what. And vice versa. Just the times we shared. The moments when it’s not all been great, but to be able to have somebody to talk to and run things by. A lot of people don’t have a LeBron James to call up and say, 'Hey, I’m thinking about this, what do you think about it?’ That’s special.” What will also be special Monday night (Tuesday, PHL time) is when Wade, as has been his routine after every game this season, swaps jerseys with an opposing player; this will be the 1,001st game of Wade’s dwindling NBA career. “Obviously this is something I wanted to do in my last year,” Wade said. “But of all the players in the league, LeBron is one of my closest friends so this one will mean a little more, because of the paths that we both went down as competitors against each other and as teammates. We’ll be linked together forever.” And what might be said between friends and competitors caught up in that moment? Wade offers this: “We’ll look at each other and say, 'Yo, this is it.’ It’s crazy that it happened so fast. We remember the night we got drafted like yesterday. But it comes fast. Just an ending of a chapter in both of our lives.” Veteran NBA writer Shaun Powell has worked for newspapers and other publications for more than 25 years. You can e-mail him here or follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsDec 10th, 2018

QC vice mayor eyes virtual check-up

The Quezon City government plans to address the lack of doctors in its barangay (villages) by introducing the “virtual check-up” program. “There is this technology wherein a doctor is assigned…READ The post QC vice mayor eyes virtual check-up appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsDec 7th, 2018

‘LIFE’ pushed for farmers in disaster-stricken areas

FARMERS in disaster-stricken areas in Western Visayas can now look forward to a help from the government through the “LIFE” program. LIFE, which stands for Living Income for Farmers in Emergency situations, is a form of immediate intervention for a quick turnaround for those who lost their crops, while ensuring ample supply of cheap food […] The post ‘LIFE’ pushed for farmers in disaster-stricken areas appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsDec 5th, 2018

How ex-child star Kevin Zegers ‘hit the jackpot’

Kevin Zegers' film career included starring in the popular "Air Bud" movies, back when he was a kid actor. He eventually grew up before audiences' eyes, and took on riskier roles, such as the one in the acclaimed drama, "Transamerica." More recently, he appeared in "Fear the Walking Dead" as the suave villain Melvin. The 34-year-old actor, however, is unlike his most recent portrayal, as he is a happy family man---married for a couple of years already, and a father to twin kids. On Instagram, he often talks about his wife, Jaime Feld. "Lucky men find women like this: strong, loving, powerful, sensitive, successful and kind," Zegers wrote alongside one of her photos. "I'm proud ...Keep on reading: How ex-child star Kevin Zegers ‘hit the jackpot’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsDec 2nd, 2018

Prepare for influx of cheap imported rice, farmers told

LUCENA CITY --- With the passage of the rice tariffication bill, the farmers should exert efforts to be more competitive against the expected flood of cheap imported rice, Sen. Cynthia Villar said. "Even if the government has its program but if the farmers themselves will not fight it out ... the farmers should be more competitive. It cannot be done by the government alone. It has to be done with the help of the farmers," Villar, chair of the Senate committee on agriculture and food, said in an interview here Saturday afternoon. Lower rice prices The senator said amid the rising inflation in the country, the price of rice might be lowered once the bill was signed into law due to...Keep on reading: Prepare for influx of cheap imported rice, farmers told.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 25th, 2018

DSWD eyes non-tourism livelihood in Boracay

By: Gail T. Momblan PHASE II of the Sustainable Livelihood Program (SLP) in Boracay will focus on other sources of income that are not dependent on tourism, according to the Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) in Western Visayas. “Ang pag-iisipan ano pa gid klase ka projects nga even without the tourism activity mabuhi ang […] The post DSWD eyes non-tourism livelihood in Boracay appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsNov 25th, 2018

Josie Trinidad talks Ralph Breaks The Internet, landing her dream job at Disney

MANILA, Philippines — Can you imagine being the brain, eyes, and heart behind Disney's most iconic animated films? Josie Trinidad, Head of Story for Disney Animation, doesn't have to. With a career often looked up to by both adults and kids alike, Josie is considered by many to ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsNov 22nd, 2018

Capitol Workers Hold Outreach Program for 150 Naga Kids

At least 150 children-evacuees in the City of Naga, Cebu were treated to a day of fun and entertainment by a group of young employees from the Cebu Provincial Capitol on Friday, Nov. 9. Held at the Naalad Elementary School, the children enjoyed various games and prizes plus the snacks prepared by the 32-member Capitol […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsNov 13th, 2018

Climate change: Agri department eyes shift in planting season

  After typhoons ravaged agricultural lands during the third quarter of the year which led for the sector's output to fall, the Department of Agriculture (DA) is now looking to readjust its planting calendar to make the sector less vulnerable to climate change.   Moreover, it's planning to develop new rice farming areas in provinces that are not often hit by weather disturbances to secure the country's food production.   Agriculture Secretary Emmanuel Piol revealed the agency's plans on his Facebook page and in an earlier interview with reporters, wherein he said that they will now move the harvest season in Northern Luzon -- known as the country's rice ...Keep on reading: Climate change: Agri department eyes shift in planting season.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsNov 13th, 2018

DSWD allots 254M for supplementary feeding

By: Gail T. Momblan THE Department of Social Welfare and Development (DSWD) in Western Visayas allotted P254 million for the Supplementary Feeding Program (SFP) this year. Nutritionist Dietician III Diana Alcantara, focal person for SFP said that around 192, 927 children in the region had benefited in the 120-day program. SFP provided additional food to regular meals to […] The post DSWD allots 254M for supplementary feeding appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsNov 12th, 2018

Govt SRP program launched nationwide, violators penalized

THE National Food Authority (NFA), backed by the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) and the Philippine National Police (PNP) on Friday, began imposing sanctions against rice traders and retailers...READ MORE The post Govt SRP program launched nationwide, violators penalized appeared first on The Manila Times Online......»»

Category: newsSource:  manilatimes_netRelated NewsNov 9th, 2018

DOH Eyes to Register Vapes as Drugs

The Department of Health (DOH) plans to regulate the use of vapes or e-cigarettes by registering them as drugs, an official said Monday. “We want it [the vape liquid] to be registered as a drug, because it’s definitely not food. It is potentially harmful. It is not a recreational substance that will not provide any […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsNov 8th, 2018

Program Implementers Review LNEWS-FNS Project

Program implementers assess the effectiveness of the Local Nutrition Early Warning System of the Food and Nutrition Security (LNEWS-FNS) . The review was held on 26-27 September 2018 at One Central Hotel, Cebu City. Nutrition action officers, local nutrition program coordinators, disaster risk reduction and management officers, agricultural officers, nurses and planning and development officers […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  metrocebuRelated NewsNov 5th, 2018

Food aid program benefits 1,000 families in Lanao del Sur

More than a thousand families in Lanao del Sur received food rations through a government poverty alleviation program last month......»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsNov 4th, 2018

Washington gets a taste of ‘lumpia diplomacy’

  WASHINGTON, D.C.--Through Sentro Rizal, the Philippines was the second featured embassy at the YMCA Anthony Bowen's newest cooking program called "A Taste of Diplomacy."   The Healthy Eating Department of the YMCA tries to bring communities together and bridge cultures by discovering the cuisines of various countries. Ten (10) YMCA members and DC residents participated in the evening cooking program that featured Filipino dishes on Oct. 24.   Chef Cho Ortega, owner of family-owned restaurantLumpia, Pansit, Atbplent her cooking skills, partnering with the Embassy for the event.She presented a wrapped food theme and demonstrated how to make Filipino favo...Keep on reading: Washington gets a taste of ‘lumpia diplomacy’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsOct 29th, 2018