‘Do all things with love’

By: Ancel Marie B. Mondia JOSE ROY Santos Jr., 21, of Iloilo City, is a public speaker, a student leader, and an Outstanding Boy Scout of the Philippines and is now a Certified Public Accountant working for one of the biggest international accounting firms, KPMG RG Manabat & Co. Santos comes from a poor family but […] The post ‘Do all things with love’ appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource: thedailyguardian thedailyguardianJan 12th, 2018

Jarvey Gayoso’s biggest critic? His dad Jayvee

In just his third season in the UAAP, Ateneo Football’s Jarvey Gayoso has already bagged three straight Best Striker nods, an MVP trophy, and a men’s championship. The star striker has come up big for his team on countless occasions and has emerged as the team’s go-to-guy, even more so now as the young Blue Eagles continue their quest for repeat titles. This year, Gayoso is on pace for another Best Striker nod with 13 goals in eleven matches played, and the defending champion Blue Eagles are second in the league, one point behind top-seeded University of the Philippines. With the way things are going, it may be hard to criticize Gayoso’s play… …that depends, of course, who you ask. Sunday afternoon, Ateneo avenged their first round loss to University of Santo Tomas with a 2-0 win, and Gayoso again had his hand on the win, scoring one of the goals. Watching from the stands was Jarvey’s dad Jayvee. In fact, it was Jayvee’s first time to see Jarvey and the Blue Eagles win a match in the UAAP live, and the younger Gayoso jokingly said that maybe his dad was a bringer of bad luck. “Honestly, this is his first game to watch na we won. I think he’s watched three games na one draw, tapos dalawang talo. After a while I was feeling na baka malas, alam mo naman mga Pinoy, superstitious,” Jarvey said with a laugh. “But then after today, of course, I’m blessed to have him here, he’s a busy guy, and my father drives all the way from Laguna to watch me, along with my mom and my siblings, it’s a nice experience to have him,” While most parents are their child’s biggest fan, Jayvee will be the first to tell you that he isn’t like that. Being a former athlete himself, the former Ateneo basketball star and PBA standout will always see areas of improvement, especially in his son. “I have every reason to be proud of what Jarvey does, but because of my knowledge on sports and how I’ve handled so many players before, Jarvey knows that I’m always tough, I’m here to criticize him, I’m always here to point out the wrong things he does, I always stress to him that without his teammates, his greatness is just 50 percent.” “I’m not the typical type of dad who will, you know, I’m more of the critic rather than, but at the end of the day, of course, my heart, I’m trying to do things to help him out even more, for his life.” Jayvee added. And for Jarvey, it becomes a source of motivation and a different perspective on his growth as a player. “Because my dad’s also an athlete, he’ll always see the things that I can improve on, which is good for me, because I’ll be able to understand what I can’t see and what he sees, and I’ll be able to know what I can further work on.” So far, it seems to be working. As for finally getting to see his son get a win in the UAAP, Jayvee was of course happy, but that doesn’t mean it’s a reason to stop working to get better. “I’m happy of course that they won, I’m happy he was able to score, ako kasi defensive player ako nung ako’y player, so I’m always…I fight him all the time, Jarv, help on defense! Pero nakikita ko nakakapagod din yung ginagawa niyang pagtatakbo ano, but of course I’ll never stop.” “Even if I’m content with what he does, at the end of the day, I am still gonna criticize, like I said, and tell him, may kulang pa din, Jarv. Never be satisfied. Never be satisfied.” Jayvee continued. The win over UST was of course a sweet one, especially for Gayoso, who was visibly down after their first round loss to the Growling Tigers. It was sweeter more so, having his dad around to see it happen. “Nakaka-kaba, siyempre, because your biggest critic is here, but at the same time I love it when he watches, I love doing well and and being able to know that he’s in a good mood because of the way I played, because it’s fulfilling.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 19th, 2018

Why Dingdong considers new flick with Anne ‘a big thing’

Almost 20 years after they first---and last---worked together, Dingdong Dantes will reunite onscreen with his former "T.G.I.S." costar, Anne Curtis. But this time around, it's for a romantic film. The coming film, titled "Aya and Sid (Not a Love Story)," is Dingdong and Anne's first project together in which they play romantically involved characters. "It's such a big thing. I appreciate things like this," said Dingdong, who, in his two decades in show biz, has never shot a movie overseas---until now. It was also amusing, he added, to see just how much Anne has grown through the years. "Nakakatuwa ... It was one of the first big projects of our careers here in the industr...Keep on reading: Why Dingdong considers new flick with Anne ‘a big thing’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 19th, 2018

Top 10 must-have items in your closet, according to Liz Uy

I’m happy to be back doing one of the things I love — writing!.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 15th, 2018

Venus, Halep win, Wozniacki upset at Indian Wells

By Beth Harris, Associated Press INDIAN WELLS, Calif. (AP) — Venus Williams defeated Anastasija Sevastova of Latvia 7-6 (8), 6-4 to reach the quarterfinals of the BNP Paribas Open on Tuesday as the oldest woman in the draw. The 37-year-old American was coming off a straight-set victory over younger sister Serena a night earlier, ending a three-match skid against her sibling. "It was a quick turnaround from last night when it feels like, 'Hey, this is a final to you're only in the fourth round,'" Williams said on court. Playing under cloudy skies in 80-degree heat, Williams had her hands full with Sevastova, who used drop shots, top spin, lobs and jerked her 10-years-older opponent side to side. "There were some points where she just played and it was too good," Williams said. "I thought I was in control of the point and winning the point, and she turned it around. It's just real talent." After early losses in her first two tournaments of the year, Williams hasn't dropped a set at Indian Wells, where she has yet to reach the final in six previous appearances. Awaiting Williams in the quarterfinals is 27th-seeded Carla Suarez Navarro of Spain, who beat American wild card Danielle Collins 6-2, 6-4. Simona Halep is on track to retain her No. 1 world ranking after defeating Wang Qiang of China 7-5, 6-1 in the fourth round. Halep is the only former Indian Wells winner left in the women's draw after No. 20 Daria Kasatkina upset No. 2 Caroline Wozniacki 6-4, 7-5. Wozniacki blew a 3-0 lead in the first set and was on the run most of the match before losing for the second time this year to the 20-year-old Russian. "She outsmarted me," Wozniacki said. By reaching the quarterfinals, Kasatkina is projected to surpass her career-best ranking of 17th. She has beaten all four current Grand Slam titleholders in the past year, including U.S. Open winner Sloane Stephens in straight sets this week. "I'm playing best matches against the best players," Kasatkina said. "But as I say, if you want to be on the top, you have to beat the top players. So quite simple rule." Halep improved to 17-1 this year and needs only to reach the final to stay at the top. Next up for Halep is Petra Martic of Croatia, who beat Marketa Vondrousova of the Czech Republic 6-3, 7-6 (4). American teenager Amanda Anisimova's run of success ended in a 6-1, 7-6 (2) loss to No. 5 seed Karolina Pliskova of the Czech Republic. Anisimova, a 16-year-old wild card, won her first three WTA Tour matches at Indian Wells, beating Pauline Parmentier, No. 23 seed Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova and two-time Wimbledon winner Petra Kvitova without dropping a set. "She's 16, so she's not scared," Pliskova said of Anisimova. "You can see she's hitting the ball without thinking. But everybody is playing like this when they are 16. I think this will change a little bit in the future, but for sure the game is good and not really any weakness. I think everything is pretty solid." Pliskova faces a quarterfinal against Naomi Osaka, who beat Maria Sakkari of Greece 6-1, 5-7, 6-1. Halep attended Venus Williams' straight-set victory over 36-year-old sister and new mother Serena on Monday night. "I love the way that they are motivated and they are still playing at this age, Serena with the kid," Halep said. "It's a great thing what they do for sport, and it's great that tennis has them. I have many things to learn from them. That's why I'm trying just to go in to watch every time I can." On the men's side, Gael Monfils retired in the second set with a back injury trailing fellow Frenchman Pierre-Hughes Herbert 6-2, 3-1. Monfils used an eight-minute injury timeout in the second set to get his back worked on before returning to the court and getting broken in fourth game. He then walked to the net and ended the match. Herbert moved on to a fourth-round matchup with Philipp Kohlschreiber of Germany, who upset No. 2 seed Marin Cilic 6-4, 6-4. Cilic won 19 of 23 points on his first serve, but failed to convert four break points against 31st-seeded Kohlschreiber, who snapped a 12-match skid against top-10 opponents. Herbert remains in contention for the $1 million bonus offered to a player who sweeps the singles and doubles titles. No. 6 Juan Martin del Potro of Argentina defeated No. 29 David Ferrer of Spain 6-4, 7-6 (3) for the fifth straight time. With Cilic, Ferrer, Novak Djokovic, Monfils and John Isner all eliminated from his quarter of the draw, things are looking wide open for del Potro, the 2009 U.S. Open champion. Top-ranked Roger Federer and del Potro are the highest seeds remaining. "I'm not thinking about that. I just want to keep winning," del Potro said. "Still far away from the final, but of course, any chance to play with Roger would be great." Del Potro's countryman, Leonardo Mayer, beat Japanese qualifier Taro Daniel 6-4, 6-1. Mayer next plays del Potro. No. 18 Sam Querrey rallied past Indian qualifier Yuki Bhambri 6-7 (7), 6-4, 6-4 and will play No. 28 Feliciano Lopez of Spain. He spoiled a potential all-American quarterfinal by beating No. 8 Jack Sock 7-6 (8), 4-6, 6-4. No. 32 Milos Raonic of Canada defeated Joao Sousa of Portugal 7-5, 4-6, 6-2 and will meet Marcos Baghdatis of Cyprus, who beat lucky loser Dudi Sela of Israel 7-6 (7), 6-4......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 14th, 2018

Watsons says ‘It’s Time To Love The Sun’

IT’S SUMMER! It’s probably the best time of the year to go on adventures, try new things, and create new memories. Needless to say, it’s the perfect time to just go out there and literally do anything under the sun. With all the promise of fun and good times, the one thing most of us […] The post Watsons says ‘It’s Time To Love The Sun’ appeared first on The Daily Guardian......»»

Category: newsSource:  thedailyguardianRelated NewsMar 13th, 2018

KathNiel’s advice to MayWard: Never get tired of thanking fans

Maymay Entrata and Edward Barber talked about the many things their Kapamilya seniors Kathryn Bernardo and Daniel Padilla taught them about the acting profession and life. In an episode of the morning talkshow “Magandang Buhay” which aired today, March 12, the MayWard love team was asked about how Bernardo and Padilla helped them grow as… link: KathNiel’s advice to MayWard: Never get tired of thanking fans.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsMar 12th, 2018

KathNiel’s advice to MayWard: Never get tired of thanking fans

Maymay Entrata and Edward Barber talked about the many things their Kapamilya seniors Kathryn Bernardo and Daniel Padilla taught them about the acting profession and life. In an episode of the morning talkshow "Magandang Buhay" which aired today, March 12, the MayWard love team was asked about how Bernardo and Padilla helped them grow as actors and as individuals. Entrata recalled how Bernardo had been so accommodating during shoots for the television series "La Luna Sangre". Entrata thought, being new, she and her love team partner would feel left out, but Bernardo constantly made them feel comfortable in the set. "Pagpunta sa 'La Luna' akala namin ma-OP kami pero hindi! Si...Keep on reading: KathNiel’s advice to MayWard: Never get tired of thanking fans.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 12th, 2018

I LOVE YOU, THIS GAME: Death threats and 5-peso coins, the MBA was crazy

There was confidence in the Metropolitan Basketball Association's regional format to succeed. After all, people love it when their home gets the spotlight. At the very least, the MBA was going to be a strong league for the actual cities and provinces that were represented in it. However, even those who believed in the MBA the most probably didn't expect just how big the reception was going to be. It was crazy and someone like this writer, who was too young to experience the bliss that is the MBA, can't do it justice. Fortunately, those who actually lived through the craziness of the MBA can tell those stories now, 20 long years later. Chito Victolero, former guard of the San Juan Knights and current head coach of Magnolia in the PBA: Sometimes merong mga unruly crowd na talagang very supportive sila at merong fanatics so sometimes nakakagawa sila ng mga ‘di tama, but you know kasama ‘yun eh. Kasama ‘yung sa dapat mong paghandaan, kasi you have to include it in your scouting report, ‘yung how to be mentally tough during the game. Kasama ‘yung crowd dun. ‘Yun nga ‘yung MBA. That’s why kakaiba siya kasi kung regular crowd lang siya, parehas lang ng ibang liga ‘yan. That’s why kakaiba ‘yung MBA. The crowd was very different then. ‘Yun ‘yung maganda dun. Kasama siguro sa marketing strategy ng MBA ‘yun, how to deal sa ganung crowd. Kasi iba ‘yung crowd, iba ‘yung atmosphere, iba ‘yung spirit ng game, lahat nandun eh. Nakaka-miss nga eh. When you go to Bacolod, to Cebu, nae-excite ka agad because you know there’s a big crowd. We wonder if coach Chito has a scouting report for Ginebra fans during Manila Clasico?   Dondon Hontiveros, former guard for the Cebu Gems who went on to become a PBA legend. Current guard for Alab Pilipinas: There was a time talaga na masasabi ko na ‘yung outrageous na ginagawa ng mga fans pa… may mga batuhan. Nakita nga natin dito may nagbato ng bottled water sa referee pero it was worse then. It even came to a point na kapag nalaman ng fans kung ano ‘yung hotel ng kalaban parang inaabangan na ba. And ganun din kami if we go travel to Bacolod, ganun din ‘yung nae-experience namin. Fortunately for me, pagkakaalam ng mga taga-Bacolod, taga-doon ako because the year before, in 1997, I played there sa Negros Basketball Association for Central and maganda pinakita ko. So naalala nila na dun ako naglaro, so ‘di naman masama para sa’kin. Cebu vs. Negros was one of the premier rivalries in the MBA and Hontiveros was the star of the Gems. "Fortunately for me," might be an understatement for Dondon.   Rafi Reavis, former center for the San Juan Knights. Still plays for Magnolia in the PBA and is the winningest active player, with 10 championships: It was always one of the teams at the South, because it was always the North versus the South. Negros, we had a tough time down there. Cebu’s also a tough place to play – not only did you have do play in a hostile environment, and when I say hostile I mean coins being thrown at you, hamburgers, apples, anything you can think of, it can be coming your way. You really had to watch out if things get heated in those places. That was just how passionate the fans were. I mean, they’re the nicest people but hey, don’t come in here and try to take what we’re trying to achieve here. It was pretty cool.  I never heard any racist things but I’ve been cursed out by old ladies before. I remembered an old lady, about 80-plus year-old, she just walked by me before the game cursing me out so I was like ‘Wow!’. But I also understood these fans are just passionate, this was their home team, so I understood. I get it. And as a player, you cannot let stuff like that affect you, and that’s just the will power you had to have. You have to put yourself inside of a bubble and focus on the task at hand which is the game, win the game and get out of there, hopefully safely, and leaving everything else to the fans and the things you can’t control, you leave it alone. Rafi must have been quite the charm back in the MBA.   Reynel Hugnatan, former forward for the Negros Slashers and current forward for the Meralco Bolts with at least 5,000 career points in the PBA: Naalala ko nun naglaro kami sa Cebu, may dala na kamig mga payong sa ilalim ng upuan namin. Kasi alam namin, pag konting ano lang, magbabatuhan na naman. Pag nagbatuhan, ready na kami, may payong na kami. Always bring an umbrella folks.   Nash Racela, former head coach for the Batangas Blades and current head coach for TNT KaTropa: If you watch the MBA ang daming hecklers di ba, talagang sinisigawan ka the whole game. I'm thinking one game in Davao, and there was another game in Negros na parang the whole game, may isang tao nasa likod ko na sigaw lang ng sigaw sa akin. Ganun talaga eh, it just shows the passion of the Filipino basketball fans. That's understandable, it really made the game more interesting nung mga panahon na yun. We think coach Nash would prefer this set up than having to bring his own umbrella to the bench.   Alex Compton, former guard for the Manila Metrostars and current head coach for the Alaska Aces: It hurts if a five-peso coin comes flying from the upper deck and hits you in the head. That leaves a bump and that happened a few times in a few different places. In the MBA that was almost expected because everybody was so intense. You should have brought an umbrella coach.   Peter Musngi, the one and only "Voice of ABS-CBN," he was one of the key people for ABS-CBN in the MBA from the league's inception to its untimely demise: One of the things that I remember, and kapag inaalala ko nga lang kinakabahan pa ko eh, I think I was seated beyond Commissioner Ogie Narvasa then sa official’s table and noong nagbatuhan… we were warned already kasi it was Negros vs. Cebu, sabi baka magkagulo. Noong may questionable call daw ng referee, biglang nagliparan ‘yung mga coins. Nakita ko talaga tumatama kay Commissioner Ogie Narvasa, but he looked at the back and stayed. Ako naman, tatakbo na sana ako (laughs) kasi nagkakagulo na pero ‘nung nakita ko si Ogie, ‘Ay nakakahiya, sige na nga bahala na matamaan sa ulo’ (laughs). So that’s one. The others are from the coverage standpoint, dahil we were always moving around, and it came to a point paggising mo ‘di mo alam kung nasaan ka. It takes a few minutes to think ‘Oh, saan kami nanggaling? Saan na kami ngayon?’ Or the fact that we were eating Jollibee for breakfast, lunch and dinner (laughs) because ‘yun ang sponsor eh. That wasn’t bad, but we had to be creative and say, I mean kasi umuulan, umaaraw, ‘di mo alam tapos, sabi naming ‘At least man lang arroz caldo, mainit.’ Jollibee all day, everyday? Now that's crazy.   Ramon Fernandez, the "El President" and four-time PBA Most Valuable Player served as the MBA's very first Commissioner: The biggest problem of the Commissioner's Office at the time were the fans, the rowdy fans. Masyadong fanatic sa mga teams nila. I remember distinctly one game in Negros, it was the Cebu Gems and the Negros Slashers, nagkagulo yung players. The fans just started throwing things and I had to stop the game. Mabuti na lang nandoon yung bishop, sitting beside me. So pinakiusapan ko siya na, 'Bishop baka pwede mo naman kausapinyung crowd na let's just enjoy and have fun' pumayag naman siya. Natuloy yung game, laro ulit. Eh nagkaroon na naman ng gulo, ganun na naman nangyaro so I said, 'Bishop baka one more time,' sabi niya, 'Mon leave it all to God.' Sometimes all you can do is just pray and ask for Divine Intervention.   Ramon Tuason, CEO of MetroBall, Inc., the mother company of the Metropolitan Basketball Association: It was a Cebu-Davao game and Ramon Fernandez was able to gather 14 large garbage cans of debris [from the game]. From rocks, to plastic bottles, to bottles with green liquid inside, anything. Marbles, socks with marbles inside, they were throwing everything inside. As a matter of fact, we had to ban plastic drinking water from entering the stadium after like the fourth or fifth game. We had to go through the Army, the PNP, and everybody to have support in the stadiums because of the fans' passion. We call it the passion of the nation but sometimes, they become too passionate, too emotional. Very difficult to control the crowds. In Bacolod, there was a situation where a bomb exploded inside a garbage can. Players, coaches, and including us got death threats especially during the inauguration game, because as you remember, the PBA, who was I guess threatened, decided to move their opening day to our same opening day and made it a Robert Jaworski birthday bash. I guess Jaworski fans were a bit pissed off that we were in the same day but actually, they moved their opening day to ours, as a matter of fact, ABS-CBN had a countdown. The PBA was threatened? Interesting... (to be continued)   *I Love You, This Game is a series celebrating the Metropolitan Basketball Association's 20th anniversary. Stay tuned for more! READ PART 1: I LOVE YOU, THIS GAME: The logo that started a basketball revolution READ PART 2: I LOVE YOU, THIS GAME: The Passion of the Nation READ PART 3: I LOVE YOU, THIS GAME: Trouble from Lakerland --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 12th, 2018

Rose embraces new home, blocks out doubters

By Steve Aschburner, MINNEAPOLIS – Don’t let go of the rope. It’s one of Tom Thibodeau’s most familiar exhortations, a mantra of sorts to keep his teams locked in, digging down and generally committed through whatever grueling test they’re facing, be it a game, a road trip, a spate of injuries or the entire season. The trouble for Derrick Rose with that particular Thibs-ism is, so often, he has been the rope. On one side of an unfortunate tug o’ war, we’ve had the Rose loyalists, the fans, friends and family who believe that the 2010-11 NBA Most Valuable Player’s return from injury hell to elite status is just one more, legit opportunity away. Pulling from the other side, there is a growing group of Rose skeptics who are convinced that the Chicago kid’s best days – his most explosive, elusive, game-changing moves – are behind him, strewn on the floors of too many surgical rooms and rehab gyms. Rose, 29, knows they’re there. One group pulling for him, the other doubting him. And in an unusually candid and forceful moment Saturday (Sunday, PHL time), the normally soft-spoken Rose delivered a stark message to them all. “Yeah,” Rose said after his first full practice since signing a minimum-salary contract Thursday (Friday, PHL tie) to join the Minnesota Timberwolves. “This is how I feel about the whole perspective on it: You can have your perspective on me as far as I’m a bum, I can’t play, I can’t shoot, this and that. All right. Cool. I have no hard feelings with that. I’m cool with that. If that’s how you feel, that’s how you feel. “But at the same time, I don’t need your [bleeping] validation.” Rose’s eyes burned bright, in a direct response to the many health challenges he has endured from acquaintances and strangers both, picking at whatever good or bad is left of his basketball career. “I know who I am,” Rose continued. “I know the type of player I am. So, you respect that and I respect that, and we should be good. That’s how I feel about it.” In other words, you work your side of the street, Rose will continue to work his. If there are NBA administrators like Thibodeau, the Wolves’ head coach and president of basketball operations, willing to give him another chance, he’ll be chasing the ghost of his own self while trying to help somebody win. One more chance Rose’s latest grab at faded glory could begin in Sunday’s (Monday, PHL time) matinee against the defending champion Golden State Warriors at Target Center (editor's note: Rose wound up playing just seven minutes off the bench. He finished with two points on 1-of-5 shooting with a rebound, two assists, and two turnovers). It probably is his last, best shot to salvage something from a 2017-18 season that’s been largely lost due to injury, yes, but other factors outside Rose’s control as well. What looked like a terrific opportunity back in training camp – signing with Eastern Conference power Cleveland Cavaliers and home to the game’s best player (and Rose nemesis) in LeBron James – got sideways fast. In the Cavs’ second game, on a drive to the rim, Rose got whacked across the face and neck by Milwaukee center Greg Monroe. He landed badly on the baseline, suffering a “jacked-up” left ankle that left him in a walking boot and sidelined him for 11 of Cleveland’s next 15 games. Then word got out just before Thanksgiving that Rose had left the team, reportedly to contemplate his future as an NBA player. He was gone for nearly two weeks, at least part of it back home in Chicago, during what Cavs GM Koby Altman called “a very challenging and difficult time for Derrick.” Rose didn’t play again until Cleveland’s 44th game. In nine appearances over the next three weeks, he was a shell of the three-time All-Star he’d once been, averaging 6.3 points, 1.6 assists and 13.3 minutes, while shooting 39 percent. On Feb. 8 (Feb. 9, PHL time), he was one of six Cavaliers players dealt by Altman at the NBA trade deadline, sent to Salt Lake City as a throw-in to acquire Utah’s Rodney Hood and Sacramento’s George Hill. Two days later, the Jazz waived Rose. Four weeks passed before Thibodeau got the green light from Minnesota owner Glen Taylor to sign Rose. The Oklahoma City Thunder had sniffed in his direction, only to opt for veteran backup Corey Brewer. Rose had family duties to attend to – he and Alaina Anderson had a baby girl in Chicago to start the week – but he also had spent time working out by himself in the Cavs’ facility or at Cleveland State’s gym. The end seemed near. Given Rose’s limited involvement this season, he probably would have been a long shot to land with one of the league’s 30 teams in 2018-19, had Thibodeau not reached out. The people on the dark end of Rose’s rope were winning. Now, this buys him time for a shout-out to the folks on the other end. “‘Don’t give up,’ Rose said he would tell them. Talking later at the downtown Minneapolis hotel where he’s staying, he wanted to assure people that his desire to play remains strong, his passion to keep trying still burns, and his mental fitness for this and future challenges on or away from the court is fine. “I still have faith,” Rose said, two bags of ice strapped to each leg. “No matter what happens, I still have a lot of faith in myself and my ability. It’s just about opportunity and catching a rhythm. Whenever I do catch a rhythm, I’d rather see what it is then. Than to, like, give up knowing I have so much left. Like, ‘Damn, I should have kept playing.’ “I’m going to give it my all. And once I do, then it’s like, ‘All right, cool. I gave it my all, now what’s this next phase in my life?’ “But as far as right now, I’m still in it. I’ve got two kids that can look at me now. The oldest, my boy [P.J.] is 5 years old. He’s looking at me right now. He sees everything. I’m going to tell him, ‘No excuses. Don’t come to me cryin’, this and that. Nah.’ He’ll see what I’ve had to go through. ‘Now suck it up and go out there and do what you’ve got to do.’” A career interrupted For some NBA players whose careers got waylaid by injuries – Brandon Roy, Greg Oden, Penny Hardaway – their bodies finally refused to cooperate. They went from 60-to-0, no wiggle room on whether they would continue. Rose, for all his setbacks, has worked his way back – not back to his previous form – from each and every injury. From the ACL blowout that started him down his hobbled path in April 2012 to three subsequent meniscus knee surgeries, from the left orbital fracture he suffered when he caught teammate Taj Gibson’s errant elbow in the face in the opening practice of 2015-16 to the lingering ankle sprain dealt by Monroe’s blow in October. In that sense, Rose is more like Bernard King, Sam Bowie or Grant Hill, standout players whose career trajectories were forever altered – but not ended – by injuries. Rose speaks as if he has reached some level of peace with his maladies, referring to his injuries as “part of the game” and his particular “cross” to bear. “I’ve just had five surgeries more than other people,” he said. “That’s the way I look at it. That don’t mean that I can’t play. That don’t mean that I lost my love for the game. No.” What Rose doesn’t like is the “fragile” label that’s been affixed to him. He’s less interested that he has played in only 486 of approximately 789 regular-season games so far, while proud of the 130 he logged with the Bulls (2015-16) and Knicks (2016-17) more recently. It seems clear that the reckless abandon with which Rose played – and the excruciating torque he put on his knees with his bounding, zig-zag attacks through the lane – wreaked havoc on his knees. Beyond that, though, he’s not buying any pattern business. “You see how I was injured [in October]? I was taken out of the air,” Rose said. “People are like, ‘Aw, he’s always injured.’ Are you just watching highlights, just looking at clips, like new fans are these days? Or are you watching an entire game? Are you just reading reports that come up on your phone?” Scouts say that Rose has lost both quickness and leaping ability, without developing a perimeter game to compensate. They also bundle his Cleveland hiatus with the AWOL episode last season with the Knicks, when Rose left the team without notice before a game against New Orleans, to question his reliability and commitment. Rose disputes the comments about his game, citing the circumstances in New York and Cleveland. “I could sit here and tell you, ‘I’m gonna try to change this. Do this and do that.’ Nah, I always felt, it starts with my rhythm,” he said. “[In] New York ... I was playing the triangle [offense favored by former Knicks president Phil Jackson] and still playing pretty well [18.0 ppg, 4.4 apg, 32.5 mpg]. In Cleveland, when did I really have a chance to catch a rhythm? When did I play 20 games straight? Or 10 games? Five games?” As for his reliability – or likelihood to take a powder on the Wolves the way he did on the Knicks and seemed to do on the Cavs – Rose said there is no issue there, either. In the past couple weeks, Toronto’s DeMar DeRozan (depression) and Cleveland’s Kevin Love (panic attacks) have opened up about psychological challenges they and other athletes face. But Rose shook his head as the question was asked. “Oh no, no, no,” he said. “I’m blessed, man. Beyond blessed. It’s not even ... what do I have to complain about? I don’t have anything to complain about. Of course, I wish I was on the court more. I think in time, with the right opportunity, I’ll be out there more. “I’m not depressed, even though I think everybody deals with some depression in some way. It’s about how you deal with it. We’re emotional creatures. We hold onto things. I try to meditate, try to do little things to change my mindset and try to read things to easy my nerves.” Rose admitted he did wonder if he would get another chance, once the Cavs traded him to a Jazz team that had no use for him. “Especially when you get dropped by a team like Cleveland, that needed players,” he said. “It makes other teams think, ‘Damn, if they didn’t keep him...’” Rose has not spoken with James since being dealt, he said. “The way I take it, I don’t take it as personal,” Rose said. “They didn’t need my services. That’s the way I look at it, OK? I understand. It’s business. Does that stop me from working hard? Does that stop me from still putting out goals and trying to reach my goals? No.” Familiar faces aid return Now Rose is reunited with Thibodeau, Gibson, Jimmy Butler (sidelined after his own meniscus surgery) and familiar coaches and staff making up the “TimberBulls.” He even trusts Thibodeau, often criticized for the heavy minutes he loads on his top players, not to break him. “If anything, I want him to play me,” Rose said. “I want to show to him that I can still play. I want him to see me and be like, ‘Damn, he’s still got it.’ I want him to count on me. I want to be held accountable. You know what I mean? I don’t just want to be, like, an average guy on the team riding along just to see how far they go. I really want to add.” Said Thibodeau, who ran Rose Saturday (Sunday, PHL time) through a rigorous refresher course on his playbook: “Obviously when he was at an MVP level, that was the peak. But he also, my last year in Chicago, he had a great year. ... He still has the potential to be very good. He’s young, that was the other part of it. He knows some of our guys, he knows the system. “Like all stories, there’s a beginning, there’s a middle and there’s an end,” the Wolves coach added. “I don’t think it’s a finished story.” Gibson thinks Rose can shoulder some of Butler’s late-game duties, simply because the scoring guard has strong muscle memory of such situations. He, too, hopes Rose’s story can take a happy turn. “I’ve got my fingers crossed,” the veteran forward said. “I truly believe in him. He’s got a lot left in the tank. It’s just, sometimes life doesn’t go your way and you have to push through it and keep fighting.” Thibodeau has said that Rose, like starter Jeff Teague and backup Tyus Jones, can play both backcourt spots, so he can mix-and-match based on situations. Rose anticipates no problem walking that line between asserting his game and rocking the Wolves’ boat. “My job coming here, I’m not trying to step on nobody’s toes. I’m not trying to take someone’s spot,” he said. “I’m not trying to show myself. Nah. I’m here to win. Me going out there and playing, hopefully you all see that. ‘He’s making money plays. He’s playing to win. And that’s what we wanted from him.’” Not that Rose, lest we forget from up top, needs anyone’s bleeping validation. Boosters and doubters can pull this way or that, but he said he’ll be the one who decides when his time is up. “When my love of the game is not there,” Rose said, sounding sincere near the end of his 10th season overall. “When I get tired of going to the gym. “Don’t get me wrong, we all go through that. But after a couple of days, I get antsy, I want to be in the gym. When a week or two goes by and I haven’t touched the gym, even in the summer, oh yeah, I’d know it was over.” Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 12th, 2018

I LOVE YOU, THIS GAME: Trouble from Lakerland

The essentials for the Metropolitan Basketball Association to function were in place. ABS-CBN was ready to give it a shot and Ramon "El Presidente" Fernandez believed in the idea and was on board as the MBA's first-ever Commissioner. But for the MBA to start as an actual league, it needed teams. And picking teams is not as easy as it sounds. NORTH VS. SOUTH With the way how things work in the Philippines, it made sense for the MBA to go for the North vs. South route. This pattern was still heavily-influenced by the American leagues as MetroBall CEO Ramon Tuason had a first-hand experience of the home-and-away format when he was living in the States at the height of Martial Law. "I did [North vs. South] because I grew up in the States, we were used to the football, baseball, and basketball leagues always having the regions come in, and then Finals it was always North vs. South or East vs. West," Tuason told ABS-CBN Sports in an exclusive one-on-one interview about the origins of the MBA. "We thought in the Philippines it would be perfect, North vs. South no?" he added. KNOWLEDGE IS POWER While the idea of North vs. South was fun and intriguing, Tuason still had to make an informed decision which cities or provinces he wanted to hit for the MBA. So he read some books because with books, you gain knowledge. And knowledge is power. "I thought at that time, after reading books about franchising and all that, we had to choose the most popular and more populated cities also," Tuason said when discussing the reasoning behind the original 12 teams that formed the MBA. "Of course in the North, we chose all the way from Pangasinan down. Pangasinan, Tarlac, Pampanga, then down to Manila. And then further south, Batangas, Laguna, that thing right? Tarlac was not able to come in but we were able to get the six teams from here that included Pasig. Pasig came to our doorstep, na-tsambahan namin yung Pasig but we lost Tarlac. In the south, almost all the teams we wanted," he added. The first 12 teams that competed in the MBA's first season were Pangasinan, Manila, Batangas, Pampanga, Laguna, Pasig-Rizal, Cebu, Negros, Socsargen, Davao, Cagayan de Oro, and Iloilo. Pampanga ended up being the inaugural champions of the Metropolitan Basketball League. FINDING THE OWNERS While the cities and provinces were already located, the next step for the MBA was to find people to finance these teams. For some, like Cebu, it was easy to find a team owner. "What's interesting is we got team owners to match those teams. Like Cebu, we thought of who could we approach in Cebu and there's two or three names actually. And most of them are sports backers already. Lhuillier picked it up immediately," Tuason said. For other teams, Tuason approached with a different strategy. It varied depending on the place and the people he was dealing with. "With Davao with Anthony Del Rosario, he wanted to get into politics and it was a venue for him be well known and they could afford it. So each city had one or two families that we wanted to approach and we got them most," he added. "In Batangas we were looking for a family, we were looking at the Recto family but at that time it was a bit controversial. The Araneta family came to us and deciced, 'let's do Batangas.' I said okay, no problem. In other words we didn't need the family to have a big business or a footing in the city but we wanted the family to at least have something in the city. A residence, people that work there, or a branch and we got that through LBC. Something like that," Tuason added. WHAT'S IN A NAME? So the team locations, along with matching owners, were finally identified. Now the fun part comes. Naming the teams. Of the original 12 MBA teams, Tuason says that he recommended a monicker for about eigth of them, which were to be approved by the team owners. "As a matter of fact, out of the first 12 teams, I recommended eight names," Tuason said. For some of the teams, it was just clever ideas that made sense. For others, the team had to have that name. "Lhuillier got into Cebu right? And they were into the jewelry business so obviously Gems," Tuason said of the Cebu Gems. "Iloilo, Robert Puckett was in solar (energy) so I said why don't you put Volts? He said 'oh I love it.' Batangas has to be Blades, so things like that. The owner had the final choice but we gave recommendations and they picked it up. Davao of course, had to be the Eagles," he added. TROUBLE FROM LAKERLAND Not all MBA teams faced smooth transition with regards to naming their respective squads. It wasn't because the home fans rejected them though, it was more than that. Laguna in particular, who went by the name of the Lakers, got the attention of the NBA. Oh yes it's true. "The NBA, [Commissioner] David Stern, sued the MBA here because we were using Laguna Lakers," Tuason said, recounting that one time the MBA, barely into the start of its operations, already got in trouble with the most powerful professional basketball league on Earth. "I went over to Bert Lina, the owner of the Laguna Lakers. He said 'Ramon don't worry about that,' but I said 'sir we're gonna get sued,' he answered 'where are they gonna sue us? They have to sue us in our courts and we're gonna have it moved to Laguna. Who do you think is gonna go against us in Laguna?'" Tuason added. The NBA stopped bothering the MBA after one letter. And so the MBA was ready to rock. It was fun and it was crazy. Speaking of crazy... (to be continued)   *I Love You, This Game is a series celebrating the Metropolitan Basketball Association's 20th anniversary. Stay tuned for more!   --- Follow this writer on Twitter, @paullintag8.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 9th, 2018

Top 10 must-have items in your closet, according to Liz Uy

I’m happy to be back doing one of the things I love — writing!.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philstarRelated NewsMar 6th, 2018

New era, new challenges emerge for Warriors

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst "It’s the lack of faith that makes people afraid of meeting challenges, and I believe in myself. He who is not courageous enough to take risks will accomplish nothing in life. I figured that if I said it enough, I would convince the world that I really was the greatest." -- Muhammad Ali Ali defended his heavyweight championship 20 times, during two eras: when he was young and unstoppable, after beating Sonny Liston in Miami in 1964, and when he was old and vulnerable, after beating George Foreman in Zaire in 1974. He was the fastest heavyweight ever in the first era; he was smart and could take a punch in the second. A generation later, the Golden State Warriors are defending their NBA title for a second time, in three years. But they, too, are doing so in two eras. In 2014, no one had seen anything like what Golden State did on a basketball court, and how Stephen Curry’s and Klay Thompson’s shooting range changed the geometry of NBA defenses. They stretched to the breaking point trying to get out to Curry and Thompson. They couldn’t figure out how to handle the Warriors’ five-man switching defenses. They couldn’t stand up under Golden State’s withering pace. There is no need to hold a telethon yet for the Warriors, three years later. They are 49-14 today, with four All-Stars among their five starters, including Kia MVP candidate Kevin Durant, in the prime of his career, who wasn’t there when the Warriors first beat the Cleveland Cavaliers in the 2015 Finals. They are still first in the league in Offensive Rating, first in True Shooting Percentage, first in Effective Field Goal Percentage. They still are unsolvable to most opponents. But maybe not all, not anymore. The margin of separation between Golden State and the rest of the league is still there, most of the time. But there are tiny signs of slippage. Tiny. You recall what Warriors assistant coach Bruce Frasier said in the preseason, when no one is injured and everyone thinks they’re going 82-0. “Teams are starting to figure us out a little bit,” he said then. “We’re talented, so that sometimes overrides strategy. But I feel like teams are figuring certain things out to do to counter what they’ve seen. Year one, it was really hard, because it was all new. The pieces have changed a little bit, but I feel like our challenge will be to see if we can layer on some of the offense, our fluid movement, and counters, and change things up, and execute better. Defense is always big, too, so I wouldn’t go into the complacent (problem). I think it’s going to be more execution, and how smart can we really be, and can we keep that energy up through this year?” In each of their previous three seasons, the Warriors led the league in margin of victory -- 10.1 points in 2014-15, 10.8 points in 2015-16 and 11.6 points last season. This year, though, they’ve fallen to third, behind the Houston Rockets and Toronto Raptors -- and their win margin is down to 8.5 points per game. Two years ago, the Warriors were fourth in the league in Defensive Rating (100.9). Last season, Golden State was second (101.1). This season, the Warriors are fifth, at 103.4. In 2014-15, they were 14th in the league in points allowed in the paint; this year, they’re 24th (to be fair, they were 23rd last year, when they won it all anyway). Are they bored? Tired? Aging? Is their bench inconsistency this year the result of vets saving themselves for the playoffs, or guys just getting old? And will it matter against anyone other than Houston? “Once you start getting a little older, it’s harder and harder,” guard Shaun Livingston said last week. “We definitely need the youth, we definitely need the health. We’ve got to be healthy. We’ve got to be healthy. Sometimes you see teams that maybe are over the hill -- they have the experience, but maybe not (the ability). It’s human nature. Obviously, I don’t think we’re there yet. We’ve got guys that are still in their prime. It’s mental now.” In the Jean-Pierre Coopman phase of their latest title defense (oh, how one misses spectacles like Ali fighting Coopman, the “Lion of Flanders” -- with Pat Summerall and Tom Brookshier on the call!), the Warriors came to Washington last week. There was no White House visit on the docket, only time with D.C. area kids and a trip to the African-American History Museum, with owner Joe Lacob and GM Bob Myers on the trip as well. They have been in the public eye for five years now, back to Mark Jackson’s last season as coach, when the Splash Brothers exploded into the national consciousness. That’s a long time for one NBA team to have all that light and heat on it. For a minute, the Warriors tried to convince themselves that there was a backlash building against them nationally, that people had grown tired of their 3-pointers and video game point totals. It was, of course, a ridiculous posit -- Golden State and its players are more popular than ever, the love for Curry such that he felt perfectly comfortable posting a photo of the glass table he accidentally smashed in his hotel room on Instagram, any criticism surely to be muted amid America’s love for the two-time MVP.   when you feel like you’re on the @pgatour so you gotta get some swings going in the hotel room 😂😂😂 #idiot A post shared by Wardell Curry (@stephencurry30) on Mar 1, 2018 at 1:33pm PST “There was a little guy who was probably eight years old, and he came up and introduced himself,” Steve Kerr said. “His name was Ryan, and I’m talking to him, and he goes ’oh, my God, there’s Quinn Cook!’ And he ran over to Quinn Cook. Not Steph, not me -- he loved Quinn Cook. That was cool.” Throughout the Warriors’ run, they’ve faced down different challengers in the Western Conference -- the first iteration of the Rockets with Harden, a hybrid inside-out attack where Houston unhappily and unsuccessfully tried to meld Harden and Dwight Howard in the post. The Durant/Russell Westbrook one-two combo in Oklahoma City. The Spurs, morphing from the Tim Duncan/Tony Parker-led team to the Kawhi Leonard-dominant one. The “Lob City” Clippers, followed by the Chris Paul/Blake Griffin halfcourt version. But this season’s Rockets, with Paul at the point, may be the most unique and dangerous threat to the Warriors. They are much more than a team that just rains 3-pointers on you -- though they most certainly do that, and do it historically well. They’re also an outstanding defensive team, with the additions of P.J. Tucker and Luc Mbah a Moute giving them a grit they haven’t had in past seasons to pair with the shot blocking and rim presence of Clint Capela. The numbers are stark: Houston is 32-1 this season when Paul, Harden and Capela all play, including two wins over the Warriors The Rockets have no obvious weakness. They have no fear of Golden State, either, having won two of the three meetings with the Warriors this season. It’s not just that they’re good, it’s how they’re good that makes them look like the greatest challenge yet to Golden State’s hegemony in the West. “I mean, yes, because they do it a different way, I guess,” Curry said last week. “They adopted the power of the three ball and try to use it as a main weapon, and obviously with James and CP together. Honestly, we know that they’re playing well. We’re chasing that number one seed and keeping tabs on how they’re playing and whatnot. But at the end of the day, we’ve got a lot of time left before we have to face them again. We know they’re serious. But so are we.” The Warriors have had to deal with great adversity during their run, to be sure. The biggest challenge came about this time last year, when a collision between teammates -- Zaza Pachulia and Durant, in D.C., ironically -- culminated in a Grade 2 MCL sprain and bone bruise for Durant, taking him out of the lineup at the worst possible part of the season. Golden State had just ripped off wins in 23 of its previous 27 games since a lamentable Christmas Day loss to the Cavs. Curry had started to figure out how to play with KD, and vice versa. They were in the middle of a brutal stretch of seven road games in eight overall, with the one brief return home to play the Celtics. When Durant went down, the initial fear was that he’d torn his ACL and would be out for the season. The Warriors’ locker room was funeral after the Wizards game. “Obviously, we were trying to figure out if he was like ’done-done’ for the year, or whether or not there was going to be a chance he’d return,” forward David West said. “We were, at the time he got hurt, we were just starting to figure out the sort of roles, everybody was getting comfortable with roles. We basically had to reset., change some of the functions we were doing. We lost a few games  trying to literaly just figure out and recalibrate and re-balance. That was one of those periods where we were just looking at each other, trying to start this thing -- we lost this huge, huge piece.” Yet the Warriors figured it out on the fly. And how they responded then provides a big clue to how they might respond to the challenge the Rockets present to them now. “It took us, I think we needed to get home before we were able to stablize,” Kerr said. “I want to say we lost three of the last four on the trip or something  (they did lose three of four, but one of the three losses was at Oracle in that one home game with the Celtics). We got home and righted the ship and got going. But sometimes (an injury is) a galvanizing force when a guy gets hurt, and you have to do certain things. Like, for us, when Kevin got hurt, we talked about it and we said we have to be the best defensive team in the league. We don’t have that luxury of throwing the ball to Kevin and saying ’get us 30 points tonight.'” During that stretch without Durant (March 2, 2017 to April 5, 2017), who returned just before the start of the playoffs, the Warriors led the league in the league in Defensive Rating (100.0, just head of San Antonio’s 100.2), first in opponent field goal percentage (.429), tied for second in opponent 3-point percentage (.316) and fourth in opponent points allowed per game (100.9). And once Durant returned for good, the Warriors again flexed. They tore through the West, winning all but one game en route to a third straight NBA Finals. And they took the Cavaliers apart in five games for their second title in three years. “You could see Draymond, Klay, Andre, Shaun, those guys, even Loon (Kevin Looney), were like, ’we didn’t have KD last year,’ ” West said. “For someone like myself, I just followed their lead. Klay got a little more aggressive. Draymond sort of settled everybody defensively. And we started winning.” That muscle memory will come in handy this year. Durant and Curry have missed time with injuries, and Golden State hasn’t figured out things at center just yet. (Would it shock me if rookie Jordan Bell played a big role there down the stretch? No, it would not.) But the Warriors still are smoking people in the second halves of games; per, the Warriors lead the lead in third-quarter scoring margin at 5.3 points per game, more than double the margin of the second-place Denver Nuggets. Whether it’s adjustments or something else (“mainly, fiery halftime speeches, Knute Rockne style,” Kerr opines), they have again put a lot of opponents away with 12 minutes to spare. Since the All-Star break, they’re fourth in the league in opponent field goal percentage (.433) and Defensive Rating (100.3). “This year, obviously, knock on wood, we want to stay healthy,” Curry said. “We want to continue to push in the right direction. Every year’s different. That’s the fun part about this league. No matter how much success you’ve had and what your expectations are, it’s a different journey every year. We’re right in the middle of that right now. We have an amazing record, considering how we’ve played. I think we’d all say we haven’t lived up to our own expectations. That’s okay. We have an opportunity to build the right habits and the right momentum going into the playoffs this year and do it, all 15 guys.” Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsMar 6th, 2018

Cavaliers may find Love sooner than expected

INDEPENDENCE, Ohio --- As the Cavaliers experience growing pains with four new players, relief might be ahead: Kevin Love. The All-Star forward, sidelined since Jan. 29 with a broken left hand, said Friday he could return sooner than expected. The initial timetable was for him to be out two months. "If I can get back before eight weeks, great," he said. "So I'm hoping that that is the case." Love's recovery has picked up speed in recent days. He's now able to catch the ball with a padded glove to protect his left hand, and the progress is such that there's less risk for re-injury. "One of the things I can do now is kind of catch the ball, guide it and shoot it within 1...Keep on reading: Cavaliers may find Love sooner than expected.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 3rd, 2018

Defiant Camila Mendes is ‘done with dieting’

  Riverdale" star Camila Mendes, who revealed last October that she and an older sister suffered from eating disorders, recently announced on Instagram her decision to embrace a less-strict lifestyle. "When did being thin become more important than being healthy?" asked Mendes, who plays ex-mean girl Veronica Lodge. "I recently went to a naturopath for the first time in my life. I told her about my anxiety around food, and my obsession with dieting. She phrased a pivotal question in such a way that struck a chord with me: What other things could you be thinking about if you didn't spend all your time thinking about your diet? I suddenly remembered all the activities I love...Keep on reading: Defiant Camila Mendes is ‘done with dieting’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 2nd, 2018

Kristoffer Martin finds dabbling in music ‘intimidating’

Although acting is where Kristoffer Martin wants to make a mark, he said he will always remain open to venturing into other fields in show biz. At the moment, the 23-year-old Kapuso talent also has his sights on becoming a recording artist. "I want to try other things, especially while I'm still young. That's why when GMA Records offered me a music-related project, I grabbed the opportunity," he told reporters at a recent pocket interview for his new single, "Paulit-Ulit." Singing isn't entirely new to him. As a 12-year-old child dreaming to make it in the entertainment industry, Kristoffer joined the reality talent tilt "Little Big Superstar" in 2007. "I love singing, and I use...Keep on reading: Kristoffer Martin finds dabbling in music ‘intimidating’.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsMar 2nd, 2018
Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 27th, 2018

This Week in NBA History: Cavs blow it up at the 2008 deadline

Prior to the 2018 NBA trade deadline, the Cleveland Cavaliers decided they were in need of a big-time shakeup. We all know now what happened back on February 9 (PHL time). In three trades, GM Koby Altman sent out Isaiah Thomas, Channing Frye, Iman Shumpert, Jae Crowder, Derrick Rose, and Dwyane Wade, getting back in exchange Jordan Clarkson, Larry Nance Jr., Rodney Hood, and George Hill (they also sent out their 2018 first round pick, a 2020 second-round pick via Miami, cash, and the draft rights to Dimitrios Agravanis). Initial reactions have been positive. The Cavaliers definitely were not going back to the Finals with the roster they had coming into the season. They were too old, didn't have enough shooting, and had severe chemistry problems. Not only did The Land upgrade at several positions of need, they got younger, and they didn't have to shed their coveted 2018 unprotected Brooklyn Nets first rounder. Obviously, they'll need to work on their chemistry now, and when Kevin Love returns to the lineup, but you can't help but feel their chances of making it to four straight Finals increased as a result of all their wheeling and dealing. Ten years ago, the Cavaliers found themselves in a similar situation. On February 21, 2008 (back when the trade deadline came after All-Star Weekend), the Cavaliers, the Chicago Bulls, and the Seattle Supersonics, agreed to a three-team trade that shook up their squads. Cleveland sent out Donyell Marshall and Ira Newble to the Supersonics, and shipped Shannon Brown, Drew Gooden, Larry Hughes, and Cedric Simmons to the Bulls. In exchange, Team LBJ welcomed Joe Smith, Ben Wallace, Wally Szczerbiak, and Delonte West (plus a 2009 second-round pick that later turned out to be...Danny Green!). Cavaliers press release The day before that trade deadline, the Cavaliers were 30-24, in fifth place in the East, and a whopping 12 games behind the newly-formed Big Three of the Boston Celtics (though they did beat them that same month, 114-113 on Feb. 5). The season prior, LeBron James and company made it to the NBA Finals, only to get swept by the San Antonio Spurs. Now, with Boston dominating, team management obviously felt they needed a little extra push if they were to make it back. Prior to the trade, Cleveland was running out a first-five of James, Hughes, Newble, Gooden, and Zydrunas Ilgauskas. Boobie Gibson, Damon Jones, and Marshall provided shooting off the bench, while Dwayne Jones and Anderson Varejao were extra muscle. Post-trade, the hope was that Wallace and Smith would boost their interior defense, while sprinkling in some much-needed veteran know-how. Delonte West was seen as a more dynamic, versatile running-mate to James, and Szczerbiak could further bolster their long-range shooting. Cleveland won their first game with the new additions (they edged the Washington Wizards in the game they played before the new additions had finished their physicals), thumping the Memphis Grizzlies 109-89. They dropped their next two though, versus the Milwaukee Bucks, and those aforementioned Celtics, before winding up with a 45-37 record, good for #4 in the East (though they went just 14-13 in the aftermath of the trade). In the Playoffs, Cleveland needed six games to hurdle the Wizards in round one, before running smack into the team they made the moves to counter: the Celtics. The two squads went back-and-forth, each winning on their respective courts, but with Game 7 at the TD Garden, it was the Celtics who emerged triumphant, via a 97-92 result. And we know of course that Boston then went on to win the 2008 NBA Championship. But back to 2018. After a spirited pair of wins prior to All-Star Weekend, Cleveland has now gone 1-2 after the breaking, losing to the John Wall-less Wizards and the San Antonio Spurs. There's still 23 games left to play though, and a lot can still happen, including, as previously mentioned, working Kevin Love back in. Suffice to say, things are always interesting in in Cleveland when LeBron James is involved. With a special talent like he is, general managers really do have to ensure they're creating a roster that can put him in the best position to go deep into the postseason. That's what happened in 2008, and that's what happened again this year. Now the question is, how far will they go? The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or ABS-CBN Sports......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 26th, 2018

Jr. NBA PH sends 11 from Agusan selection camp to Manila

Jr. NBA PH press release A record-breaking 1,505 young basketball players across Mindanao welcomed the Jr. NBA Philippines 2018 presented by Alaska at Fr. Saturnino Urios University in Butuan City on Feb. 24-25. Boys and girls from Butuan, Cagayan de Oro, Bukidnon, Davao, Sarangani and other cities and provinces in Mindanao, including young Higa-onon, Manobo and Banwaon players, participated in the first-ever Jr. NBA Regional Selection Camp in Butuan City, Agusan Del Norte. 11 aspirants got the nod from Jr. NBA Coaches Rob Newson and Jeffrey Cariaso as they excelled in two days’ worth of intense basketball training and scrimmages. They also exemplified the Jr. NBA core S.T.A.R. values of Sportsmanship, Teamwork, a positive Attitude and Respect throughout the camp. Traveling to Manila for the National Training Camp on May 18-20 are Richard Carvero III, 13, and Paolo Matthew Kho, 13, of Corpus Christi School; Christian Joi Mesias, 14, of Jose Maria College; Zhan Paolo Moreno, 13, of Xavier University; Michael John Sarmiento, 13, of Father Saturnino Urios University; Klein Tyrone Tagotongan, 13, of St. Mary’s School; and Vince Uchi, 14, of Alabel National Science Highschool for the boys division and Madelyn Flores, 14, of Bukidnon National Highschool; Aishe Solis, 13, of Corpus Christi School; Mikylla Taborada, 13, of Kauswagan National Highschool; and Pauline Angelique Valle, 13, of Misamis Oriental General Comprehensive Highschool for the girls division. “There’s a lot of talent here. We were really impressed with at least three of the kids who were selected that we really feel have the natural ability to make it until the end. The kids love the game. They worked really hard and I’m excited to see them in Manila,” said Coach Newson. Boys and girls aged 10-14 who want to join the NBA’s free youth basketball program can still participate in the two remaining Regional Selection Camps in Baguio on March 17-18 and Manila on April 21-22. Interested participants can still register online at, where the program terms and conditions can be found. For more information, fans can follow Jr. NBA on Facebook at and Twitter at For all things NBA, fans can visit, like the NBA on Facebook at and follow on Twitter. To learn more about the Alaska Milk Corporation, visit and»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 26th, 2018

Kings aim to bring NBA All-Star game to Sacramento

By Josh Dubow, Associated Press The Sacramento Kings are looking to bring the NBA All-Star game to California’s capital city for the first time ever. Kings owner Vivek Ranadive, Mayor Darrell Steinberg and local tourism officials are set to detail plans for the bid for the game in either 2022 or ’23 later Thursday (Friday, PHL time) and officially submit an application to the league on Friday (Saturday, PHL time). Getting the All-Star game would cap a remarkable comeback for Sacramento, which nearly lost its franchise to Seattle in 2013 before Ranadive bought the team and put together a deal to build a state-of-the-art downtown arena. “I think it would be a recognition of the fact that the city went all-in on the Kings,” Ranadive said. “It would be the ultimate recognition that the city pulled it off. There’s a love affair between the Kings and the city and the NBA. It would be an exclamation point on that love affair.” Winning the bid won’t be easy. The Golden State Warriors are seeking the game for their new arena in downtown San Francisco that is set to open for the 2019-20 season. Milwaukee is also bidding to play the game in its new arena set to open next season and other cities also will get involved. Commissioner Adam Silver said at the All-Star game last weekend in Los Angeles that he generally supports a bid from Sacramento with one major caveat. “Sacramento and the surrounding communities provide a tremendous opportunity for an All-Star. Wine country, great golf, great scenery, all kinds of wonderful things that I think people would love to visit around an All-Star. But at the end of the day, we have to have a sufficient number of hotel rooms,” he said. Ranadive said new projects will ensure that there will be enough hotel rooms to meet the NBA’s requirement of about 6,000 rooms in the area. But the bid will offer even more options with up to 1,000 rooms through a partnership with Airbnb, as well as two or three 300-room small luxury cruise ships in the Port of Sacramento. Silver said he would be open to that possibility, pointing out that USA Basketball players and guests have used cruise ships in the past for accommodations at the Olympics, including the 2016 games in Rio de Janeiro. “Not only will we meet the requirement but we’ll also give them a choice,” Ranadive said. “Do they want to be on a beautiful river? Do they want to be in a beautiful home? Or do they want to be in a hotel room? All of that will be accessible in less than 30 minutes.” The events surrounding the game will be anchored by the Golden 1 Center, with an indoor-outdoor Global Pavilion near the capitol to host concerts and food events that show off the region. The bid promises to be able to transport fans from transportation hubs to accommodations and venues in 30 minutes or less by the use of self-driving vehicles and dedicated traffic lanes. It also will show off arena that Ranadive believes raised the bar on technology and environmentalism for sports venues. There are “smart turnstiles” that allow fans to enter at more than triple the usual speed and the NBA’s first 4K ultra HD video board that stretches 84 feet long. The arena is the first professional sports venue powered completely by solar energy, saves about 1 million gallons of water a year compared to a typical venue of its size, was built with recycled material from the mall that stood at the site before construction began and gets 90 percent of its food and beverages from within 150 miles. “I think when we built the arena we had a goal that it would be the best arena that had ever been built,” Ranadive said. “It would be an iconic structure to look at. It would give the fans an experience like no other. To be able to share that with the entire basketball loving world is obviously a huge privilege and would be a treat for us to do that.”.....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 22nd, 2018

Nance Jr. and other new Cavaliers ready for home debuts

By Tom Withers, Associated Press INDEPENDENCE, Ohio (AP) — Larry Nance Jr. has run into an unexpected snag since joining the Cavaliers. "Trying to convince my mom that I'm not living at home," he said, smiling. "We're out looking for rental properties and stuff like that and she's like, 'Oh, our basement is pretty nice.' That's probably been the toughest thing." Nance's Ohio homecoming will become even more special Thursday (Friday, PHL time) when the former Lakers forward plays his first at Quicken Loans Arena with the Cavs, the same team his dad starred with from 1987-94 Life has been a whirlwind of late for Nance, who was obtained by Cleveland shortly before the Feb. 8 (Feb. 9, PHL time) trading deadline along with guards Jordan Clarkson and George Hill and forward Rodney Hill — four players the Cavs feel can get them back to the NBA Finals. Nance competed in last weekend's All-Star dunk contest, an event he turned into an unforgettable family affair by wearing his dad's Phoenix jersey and replicating the same dunk Larry Nance Sr. did while winning the inaugural dunk contest in 1984. The younger Nance finished second to Utah's Donovan Mitchell, but that doesn't diminish memories he'll forever cherish. "The dunk contest was a blast," Nance said. "If anybody had to win, Don did awesome so I'm happy for him. At the same time those are moments that I don't know if any father and son has ever had. That's the coolest part of it all and I'm already having several pictures blown up to be framed and stuff like that." On Wednesday (Thursday, PHL time), Nance and the other new Cavs took part in their first practice at the team's facility since the trades. And while there was a lot for the foursome to cram in — photo sessions, media interviews — before Thursday's (Friday, PHL time) game against Washington, it was also a chance for a refresher course on what they learned before the All-Star break. "Just like how I suspected, they forgot the plays," Cavs coach Tyronn Lue said with a laugh. "So, we grabbed them early, tried it, and then we're going to grab them again after the shooting and just continue to keep going through the plays and a couple defensive coverages." There's a lot for the new Cavs to digest and it's vital they pick things up quickly. Cleveland is 2-0 with its recent additions, getting impressive road wins at Boston and Oklahoma City. The Cavs played with a renewed energy and purpose in those two games with the performances giving the team a much needed jolt following weeks of turmoil. Currently third in the Eastern Conference, the Cavs are heading into a brutal stretch of 17 games in 32 days, which will require Lue and his staff to do all they can to get the new players ready for the postseason. "We'll have to use shootarounds as practice time to teach and for guys to get better," he said. "Not a lot of off days now. When we play every other day, we take off, we're not going to be able to do that now, especially the new guys. Just got to be smart about it so guys get their rest, but also make sure we're teaching and letting guys come in so they'll be able to pick up what we're trying to do." In the meantime, Nance was looking forward to taking the court in Cleveland, where his father's retired No. 22 hangs from the rafters. There has been speculation that he might ask the Cavs to let him wear the number, but that's been put on hold. "I'm 24 right now," he said. "We will revisit it in the summer, but with everything that happened so fast I wasn't about to go to Cavs management say, 'Hey what would you think about taking 22 down?' But I don't want to see it come down. If there is some way where I could even drop the 'Jr.' off my jersey and wear the 'Nance' No. 22 I'd love to keep it up there. I'd also love to wear 22, but I just don't want to see it come down.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsFeb 22nd, 2018