Advertisements


‘13 Reasons Why’s’ ‘edgy’ new kid

  Bryce Cass was cast last year to star in the second season of "13 Reasons Why" as new character Cyrus, "an edgy, cynical mischief maker who serves as an unexpected champion of the downtrodden," according to entertainment site Variety. Now that the hit Netflix series is out, Cyrus is shown as a prominent addition, a punk rock-influenced student who leads his own group of rejects and unhesitatingly befriends misfit photographer Tyler (Devin Druid). Cass, 20, is a former child actor whose guest appearances in TV shows include "ER," "Barney & Friends" and, more recently, "The Night Shift." He also had roles in films like "The Guardian" and "Battle: Los Angeles." We...Keep on reading: ‘13 Reasons Why’s’ ‘edgy’ new kid.....»»

Category: newsSource: inquirer inquirerJun 18th, 2018

‘13 Reasons Why’s’ ‘edgy’ new kid

  Bryce Cass was cast last year to star in the second season of "13 Reasons Why" as new character Cyrus, "an edgy, cynical mischief maker who serves as an unexpected champion of the downtrodden," according to entertainment site Variety. Now that the hit Netflix series is out, Cyrus is shown as a prominent addition, a punk rock-influenced student who leads his own group of rejects and unhesitatingly befriends misfit photographer Tyler (Devin Druid). Cass, 20, is a former child actor whose guest appearances in TV shows include "ER," "Barney & Friends" and, more recently, "The Night Shift." He also had roles in films like "The Guardian" and "Battle: Los Angeles." We...Keep on reading: ‘13 Reasons Why’s’ ‘edgy’ new kid.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsJun 18th, 2018

Elite seek No. 5

Yeng Guiao reunites with his NLEX crew after close to three months, and how Blackwater deals with the national coach's return will determine whether the Elite can extend a franchise-best conference start in the PBA Governors' Cup on Wednesday at Smart Araneta Coliseum. But Guiao is the one who's worried. And he has all the reasons to be so. "I'm excited to get back to coaching NLEX, but the problem is, Blackwater is the hottest team right now," Guiao said after prepping his Road Warriors for the first time since taking on national duty. Unbeaten Blackwater has never had it this good and will be coming into the 4:30 p.m. contest as the solid pick to nail a fifth win using import ...Keep on reading: Elite seek No. 5.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated News3 hr. 2 min. ago

Players union reiterates disapproval of league match in US

By TALES AZZONI,  AP Sports Writer MADRID (AP) — The Spanish players' association remains against the league's plan to play a regular-season match in the United States despite receiving more detailed information. The association was not convinced by the league's update and said on Monday it still disapproved of the Girona-Barcelona game planned for suburban Miami in January. It said the league still lacks the necessary approvals from other stakeholders, and it can't guarantee the union contract won't be breached. The association doesn't have a final say on whether the game actually happens, although players recently did not rule out a strike if their demands are not considered. They complained about not being consulted by the league before the idea was presented. The association's latest announcement came three days after the Spanish soccer federation refused to approve the match, putting the plan in serious doubt. The federation requested more documentation from the league after saying it failed to show the overseas match would comply with Spanish and international regulations and TV broadcast contracts, and that it would not harm the other 18 league clubs and the fans of Girona and Barcelona. The match would also need to be approved by the U.S. soccer federation, plus continental bodies UEFA and CONCACAF. FIFA's permission is not mandatory but president Gianni Infantino recently expressed his concerns about the game. Spanish league president Javier Tebas again defended the match, saying football needs to catch up to what other sports have been doing to try to keep growing internationally. "If we don't keep working to try to grow, other competitions and other sports will leave us behind. We have to be different," Tebas said on Monday at a soccer conference in Madrid. "In the sports industry we have to try to copy what others are doing well. Why does the NBA and the NFL take a match abroad and we can't? Why can't we keep growing? This is our greatest responsibility, to grow, because this is an industry." Tebas said he was surprised by the amount of negative reaction to the proposal. "It looks like we want to play the entire league in Miami. It's just one match," he said. "We want to play one match, for strategic reasons, to try to grow the league." Earlier Monday, European Club Association chairman Andrea Agnelli, Juventus' president, said he "take(s) his hat off" to Tebas for taking the initiative and working to expand the Spanish league globally. "That's something that should be looked at," Agnelli said. "If you want to have a global audience, you need to be closer to (that audience)." The league plan to play games in the U.S. is part of a new 15-year partnership with sports and entertainment group Relevent, which operates the International Champions Cup, a tournament of club friendlies during the European offseason in July and August around the world. The Spanish federation held its season-opening Super Cup abroad for the first time in August, with Barcelona beating Sevilla in Tangier, Morocco. Real Madrid president Florentino Perez said on Sunday his team would not play the game abroad in the future, saying he was "vehemently against it." Tebas said: "The vast majority of the clubs, including Barcelona, are interested in playing this game. If Real Madrid doesn't want to go, then don't go. It's voluntary, no problem. Many clubs want to go.".....»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 25th, 2018

Calif. law protects work leave to care for sick family members 

Q: I have been working for 5 years in a Los Angeles company with 52 employees. I requested a leave of absence from work to care for my sick 21-year-old daughter. My boss denied the request and said my position will be given to someone else if I take off. Is this legal?   A: No, it is not. Your rights are protected under the California Family Rights Act (CFRA). CFRA provides that employees have the right to take a leave of absence for the following reasons:   For the employee's own serious health condition For the serious health condition of the employee's child, parent or spouse Birth of a child for purposes of bonding Placement of a child in the emp...Keep on reading: Calif. law protects work leave to care for sick family members .....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 21st, 2018

Typhoon Kills Dozens; Philippines Searches for Reasons

TAIPEI, TAIWAN - After a super-typhoon killed 6,200 people five years ago, Filipinos figured the experience had taught their country a lesson. Pre-storm warnings and disaster responses should impro.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilanewsRelated NewsSep 21st, 2018

Casilao: Reveal reasons for aborting passage of Road Boad abolition bill

Opposition Congressman Ariel Casilao of Anakpawis Partylist has asked the leadership of the House of Representatives to explain to the public its reason for recalling the final reading to approve a bill seeking the abolition of the graft-ridden Road Board. Casilao: Reveal reasons for aborting passage of Road Boad abolition bill Opposition Congressman Ariel Casilao… link: Casilao: Reveal reasons for aborting passage of Road Boad abolition bill.....»»

Category: newsSource:  manilainformerRelated NewsSep 21st, 2018

Typhoon Kills Dozens; Philippines Searches for Reasons

TAIPEI, TAIWAN - After a super-typhoon killed 6,200 people five years ago, Filipinos figured the experience had taught their country a lesson. Pre-storm warnings and disaster responses should impro.....»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsSep 21st, 2018

In Focus: 5 Reasons Why SNSD s SONEs Are The Most Loyal Fans

They've been there for their idols for more than a decade already!.....»»

Category: lifestyleSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 19th, 2018

JRU takes flight in NCAA just as Amores does so too in NBTC 24

John Amores of the JRU Light Bombers has been hailed the top high school player in Week 10 the Chooks-to-Go /NBTC 24 NCAA edition. The 6-foot-2 swingman is having a heck of Juniors campaign and his exploits have not gone unnoticed. Last Thursday, his herculean effort of 13 points and 19 rebounds paved the way for a 74-73 victory over title-contenders Mapua . That victory finished off an elimination round upset for JRU over the title conteder Red Robins. Amores, who is on his second and final year with the Light Bombers, is having a breakout season. Last year, he had modest averages of 3.6 points and 3.5 rebounds in just 13.4 minutes of play. Now in, Season 94, he amped up his game and has become one of the reasons why JRU is in a position to enter the Final Four as he is currently fourth in scoring with 18.8 points per outing. After being a constant fixture in NBTC 24’s top 20, including going as high as number two twice, Amores has finally earned the coveted number one ranking. Following Amores are three LSGH Greenies after the defending champions downed the San Sebastian Staglets, 76-65, last Tuesday. Inand Fornilos’ double-double of 24 points and 17 rebounds earned him the second spot while Joshua David came in at third following his 19-point, 9-rebound, 7-assist output. Joel Cagulangan is at fourth as he chipped in with eight points, three rebounds, and six assists in the win. Mapua’s Clint Escamis, who ruled the rankings for the past three weeks, settled for the fifth spot after their upset loss. Here are the complete Week 10 rankings: 1. John Amores (JRU) (6) 2. Inand Fornilos (CSB) (3) 3. Joshua David (CSB) (10) 4. Joel Cagulangan (CSB) (2) 5. Clint Escamis (MU) (1) 6. John Delos Santos (JRU) (9) 7. John Barba (LPU) (8) 8. Dan Arches (MU) (7) 9. Aaron Fermin (AU) (11) 10. Kean Baclaan (SSCR) (15) 11. Mac Guadana (LPU) (12) 12. Jonnel Policarpio (MU) (4) 13. Milo Janao (SSCR) (19) 14. Rom Junsay (AU) (13) 15. RC Calimag (CSB) (5) 16. Ezdel Galoy (UPHSD) (18) 17. Thomas Vasquez (JRU) (N/A) 18. Paolo Hernandez (MU) (N/A) 19. JR Ilustrisimo (EAC) 14) 20. Marwin Dionisio (JRU) (N/A) 21. Penny Estacio (SBU) (N/A) 22. Marj de Leon (LPU) (N/A) 23. Andrei Romenez (CSJL) (N/A) 24. Winderlich Coyoca (SBU) (N/A) This year, there will be three separate editions of the NBTC 24 – one for the NCAA, one for the UAAP, and one for the CESAFI – to accommodate the Juniors calendar for the whole year. After all three editions have been completed, a final list composing the top 24 players nationwide will then be chosen to participate in the annual NBTC All-Star Game in March......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 17th, 2018

Japan fisheries institute, Google to work on system to monitor illegal fishing

TOKYO --- The Japan Fisheries Research and Education Agency (FRA) will work together with Google and others to operate a system to monitor poaching at sea, as an increasing number of foreign ships fish illegally in waters around Japan. The move aims to step up efforts to investigate marine poaching, because illegal operations by foreign vessels are believed to be one of the reasons behind recent poor catches in Japan of sanma saury and other marine products. The envisioned scheme will use a system called Global Fishing Watch, which was developed by the U.S. information technology giant and other entities. The system can display ships' positions and courses on a map, based on informat...Keep on reading: Japan fisheries institute, Google to work on system to monitor illegal fishing.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 16th, 2018

The risking brain

There seems to be an oversupply of fear these days. We can argue till we are blue whether our fears are warranted or not. Some will say the accessibility to information gives us more reasons to be afraid of many things. Some say that trends point to a world that ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 16th, 2018

GLASSHOUSES: Essentials

NEW YORK (MindaNews / 15 September) — Many watch soap operas for a variety of reasons, sometimes to escape reality. For a little while, the mind is taken away from daily problems. Many swoon over love stories, cry over situations characters undergo and wish for happy endings. I watched the documentary of Faith Hill and […].....»»

Category: newsSource:  mindanewsRelated NewsSep 15th, 2018

U.P. president questions PNP over search for Diliman student

  MANILA, Philippines – University of the Philippines president Danilo Concepcion questioned the "sudden and uncoordinated intrusion" of uniformed and armed police officers inside the UP Diliman campus who searched for a student for unknown reasons.   In a letter addressed to Philippine National Police chief Oscar Albayalde, Concepcion said the presence ........»»

Category: newsSource:  rapplerRelated NewsSep 13th, 2018

Fernandez livid over Red Lions 4th quarter collapse

Fernandez had a lot of reasons to be furious with the Red Lions allowing the Knights, who went on a 19-0 surge at one stretch, to pull within a point, 69-68, with 16.8 seconds left.........»»

Category: newsSource:  philippinetimesRelated NewsSep 12th, 2018

Fernandez livid over Red Lions’ 4th quarter collapse

San Beda survived Letran on Tuesday but the Red Lions' performance down the stretch left coach Boyet Fernandez with a bad taste in the mouth. Fernandez was livid after San Beda needed to scrape past Letran late despite taking a commanding 22-point lead with only six minutes to go. "I'm just really pissed off with how we played in the fourth quarter," said a red-faced Fernandez. "First three quarters that was San Beda, but fourth quarter, I don't know whose team was that. I'm just really pissed off." Fernandez had a lot of reasons to be furious with the Red Lions allowing the Knights, who went on a 19-0 surge at one stretch, to pull within a point, 69-68, with 16.8 seconds left. "I...Keep on reading: Fernandez livid over Red Lions’ 4th quarter collapse.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Q& A: Hall of Fame Bob Lanier

By Steve Aschburner, NBA.com Bob Lanier turned 70 Monday, a big number for a big man. In fact, that number can be linked to the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer in several ways. It was in 1970 that Lanier was the No. 1 pick in the NBA Draft, selected out of St. Bonaventure by the Detroit Pistons. And it was the 70s as the decade in which Lanier excelled, earning seven of his eight All-Star appearances while averaging 22.7 points and 11.8 rebounds for the Pistons. Dinosaurs ruled the NBA landscape back then, with Lanier achieving his success against the likes of Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Bill Walton, Dave Cowens, Willis Reed, Nate Thurmond, Elvin Hayes, Artis Gilmore and other legendary big men. Yet it was Lanier who was the MVP of the 1974 All-Star Game, who won the one-off, 32-contestant 1-on-1 championship tournament run by ABC in 1973 as part of its national broadcast schedule and who (with Walton) got name-dropped by Abdul-Jabbar in the 1980 Hollywood comedy “Airplane!” [“I'm out there busting my buns every night!” he tells a kid as “co-pilot Roger Murdock.” “Tell your old man to drag Walton and Lanier up and down the court for 48 minutes!”] Lanier’s Detroit teams never got beyond the conference semifinals, though, so in 1979-80 he asked to be traded. In February 1980, the Pistons dealt him to Milwaukee for Kent Benson and a future draft pick. With the Bucks, who averaged 59 victories in Lanier’s four full seasons there, Lanier flirted with his greatest team success, yet never reached The Finals. He was 36 when bad knees and other injuries forced him to retire. Those knees still are trouble, preventing Lanier from attending this year’s Hall of Fame enshrinement ceremony -- he was elected in 1992 -- and limiting his ability to travel from his home in Arizona to catch his daughter Khalia’s volleyball games at USC. But the man nicknamed “The Dobber” was as chatty and opinionated as ever in a phone conversation last week with NBA.com: NBA.com: The league still keeps you busy, doesn’t it? Bob Lanier: Well, it did. But about 15 months ago, I had knee replacement surgery on my right leg and that is not going very well. It still aches and it gets me unbalanced. That’s what I was trying to get away from. The surgeon said mine was the most difficult one he’d ever done. I was supposed to get the left one done but I couldn’t, because the right one was bothering me so much. I can’t even stand to hit a golf ball. NBA.com: You were part of the original Stay In School initiative, if I recall correctly. BL: I was involved with a little bit of everything from the time David [Stern, longtime NBA commissioner] first called me in 1988. It started off with wanting me to do something for kids who stayed in school. We did “P-R-I-D-E,” with P for positive mental attitude, R for respect, I for intelligent choice-making, D for dreaming and setting goals, and E for effort and education. It was really amazing. The first year, we were talking about giving out 25,000 Starter jackets for kids who came to the rally. Shoot, we needed double that amount, the numbers we got. Everything is kind of under the same umbrella now with NBA Cares. Kathy Behrens [president, social responsibility and player programs] has done a wonderful job of taking this to a whole ‘nother level, her and Adam [Silver, NBA commissioner]. NBA.com: Have you ever had one of those kids whose lives you touched reach out to you years later? BL: [Laughs]. You know what, I’m laughing because you don’t expect to hear from anybody. The only time that somebody really validated something we were doing was when I wrote those books. (The “Hey, Li’l D!” series of kids books, loosely based on Lanier’s childhood adventures. Co-authored with Heather Goodyear in 2003, the Scholastic Paperbacks books still are available.) I was on a plane and one of the passengers asked me to sign the book for her, for her child. I was so taken aback by that, I was shaking while I was signing the autograph. That was really good -- I thought, maybe I did something right. NBA.com: But none of the Stay In School kids? BL: Look, in our business, in community relations and social responsibility areas, you don’t really … when you’re building houses for people, the folks who work with you side by side give you a thumbs up and say thank you before it’s over. When we do the playgrounds, we use kids in the neighborhood who are going to enjoy playing in it and having dreams -- they’re thankful. But there’s so much need out here. When you’re traveling around to different cities and different countries, you see there are so many people in dire straits that the NBA can only do so much. We make a vast, vast difference, but there’s always so much more to do. NBA.com: I know you’re not in it for the thank yous. BL: No. The only thing that stands out to me is from when I was still playing in Milwaukee and I was getting gas at a station on, I think it was Center St. A guy came up to me and said, “My dad is sick. And you’re his favorite player. Could you come up to the house and say hello to him? The house is right next door.” So I went over, I went upstairs. The guy was laying there in his bed. His son said, “This is Bob,” and he was like, “I know.” And he just had a little smile, a twinkle in his eye. And he grabbed my hand and squeezed it. And we said a little prayer. About two weeks later, his dad had died. And he left a card at the Bucks office, just saying “Thank you for making one of my dad’s final days into a good day.” NBA.com: It probably wasn’t, and isn’t, uncommon for you to be spotted out in public like that. At your size (6-foot-11, 250 pounds as a player). BL: As time passes on, people know you at first because you’re a player. Then you stop playing. And 10 years after, when a player like Shaquille O’Neal comes along, they know him and figure you must be Shaq’s dad. “You’re wearing them big shoes.” I just go along with it. “Yeah, I’m Shaq’s dad!” NBA.com: That has to sting, seeing as how Shaq took your title for the NBA’s biggest sneakers. You were famous for your size-22s. BL: Yeah, he sent me a pair one time and I think they were 23s. For some reason, I recall he would wear 23s and three pairs of socks or something instead of the 22s. NBA.com: Isn’t it sobering how quickly sports fans forget even distinctive-looking players such as yourself? BL: Absolutely correct. But that’s why we in the NBA and at the players association have to do a better job of passing down the history of our game. In a way that they’ll absorb it. Not necessarily that they’ll have to read it – it could be in a video game form, because that seems to hold interest a lot. NBA.com: You have been as busy in your post-playing career for the NBA as you ever were while playing, right? BL: I’ve really been blessed. You know this story: I started serving people with my mother [Nattie Mae] at church. Getting food to people who were sick or needy, taking it to the hospital, taking it to people’s houses or feeding them right after church. My mother was a Seventh Day Adventist and she was in the church all the time. She had me and my sister and a bunch of kids, we would all be there every Saturday. You start off doing it not only because your mother tells you to, but the food was good. Then David asked me to come help with the Stay In School, which was the start of it all. If I hadn’t graduated from college, I probably would never have gotten an opportunity to do that with the NBA. Plus, the amazing number of young people I’ve met around the country, around the world, that I think I’ve touched … some lives. I can’t say I touched everybody, but some. I always had a knack of selecting -- when I’d call up kids to help me with the presentation -- a girl or a boy who needed it. It’s amazing how many times a teacher has said to me, “You picked Joe” or “You picked Dorothy, and that’s a really difficult kid. You made them feel good.” You never let a kid fail. NBA.com: You never were a shy and retiring type. What do you think of the NBA these days? BL: I’ll tell you what, I wish that I were playing now. It’s not as physical a sport. You can do stuff anywhere in the world. You can make tons of money off the court -- I can’t imagine how much I’d make with a speaker deal and those big-ass sneakers of mine. The only thing I would not like about this era is that you’ve got to be so conscious of social media. And people taking photos of you when you don’t know they’re taking them. And having those things that zoom over your home and take pictures of your house. That part I wouldn’t like at all. NBA.com: It’s hard enough to avoid the public eye at your size. By the way, are you as tall as you used to be? BL: No, no. I remember standing next to Magic [Johnson] last year at some function we had, and I was looking at him eye-to-eye. I said, “Damn, I thought I was 6-11 and you were 6-9. You look like you’re taller than me now.” NBA.com: You might have fared well today, with the range you had on your jump shot. A big man like you or Bob McAdoo would fit right in. BL: But Mac was a true forward and I was a true center. With the game the way it is now, I think guys like he or I -- Dave Cowens, too -- could shoot from outside, inside, open up the lanes, make good passes. I say that gingerly with Mac, because every time it touched his hands it was going up. He’s my boy but that’s the truth. NBA.com: Wayne Embry, the NBA lifer as a player and executive, recently said to me about the current style of play, “C’mon, the big man likes to play too.” The game has gotten so much smaller. BL: I kind of like this game a little bit. If you’re a big who has skills, it helps to stretch the floor. You can always post up, if you’ve got a big can post up. But now you’ve got these bigs who are elongated forwards. Boogie Cousins is probably our last post-up big that I’m aware of. I think I just saw him on TV somewhere making about 10 3-pointers in a row. NBA.com: Any team or individuals to whom you pay particular attention? BL: I like watching ‘Bron [LeBron James], obviously. I like this Golden State team, too, because they play so well together. I like the kid [Anthony] Davis. With Boogie, my concern is whether he’ll be healthy this season. NBA.com: What’s your take on the “super team” approach of the past few years? BL: I think both of ‘em have their sides. Back in the day, we would never do that. There wasn’t a lot of huggin’ and kissin’, all that stuff, when you were competing. You were out there to kick each other’s butt. But with AAU ball, it’s become guys playing together on these premier teams at all these tournaments around the country. So they get to know each before they ever go to college. NBA.com: Do you think today’s players appreciate the work you and other alumni did to build the league? BL: I think everything evolves. The best thing I could say as a player is, you want to leave the game in better shape than when you came into it. You want to leave a legacy, a better brand. You want players to be making more money. You want the league to be stronger. And since we’re partner in this, it’s important that those kinds of things happen. NBA.com: The 1970s seems to be pretty neglected, as far as NBA memories and highlights. At times it’s as if the league went from Bill Russell’s Boston Celtics dynasty to Magic Johnson and Larry Bird carrying the NBA into the 80s. The league had some popularity and PR issues back then, but eight different franchises won championships that decade. BL: Back in the 70s, a lot of people were feeling that the NBA was drug-infested. Too black. That’s one of the reasons the league came up with its substance abuse program, one of the first in sports to do that. The point was not to punish guys but to help guys who needed it to get clean. As that passed, then Larry and Magic came in. The media money started going up, and then Michael [Jordan] came in in ’84 and everything took off from there. So I can see how you could kind of forget about the 70s. NBA.com: And yet now folks complain that each season starts with only three or four teams seen as capable of winning the title. Why was it different then? BL: I think everybody competed a lot. And guys didn’t change teams as much, so when you were facing the Bulls or the Bucks or New York, you had all these rivalries. Lanier against Jabbar! Jabbar against Willis Reed! And then [Wilt] Chamberlain, and Artis Gilmore, and Bill Walton! You had all these great big men and the game was played from inside out. It was a rougher game, a much more physical game that we played in the 70s. You could steer people with elbows. They started cutting down on the number of fights by fining people more. Oh, it was a rough ‘n’ tumble game. NBA.com: There were, of course, fewer teams. Seventeen when you arrived, for instance. BL: There was so much talent on every team. Every night you were playing against somebody really damn good, and if you didn’t come to play, they’d whip your behind. NBA.com: You know, I’m surprised I never heard about you being the target of a bidding war with the old ABA? Did they ever come after you? BL: Got approached at the end of my junior year at St. Bonaventure. They offered me a nice contract. But I wanted to stay in school because I thought we had a real chance at winning the NCAA title. NBA.com: Gee, that almost sounds quaint by today’s get-the-money standards. BL: Yeah. Well, I trusted them as a league -- it was the New York Nets, a guy named Roy Boe -- but I knew we had a really good team. And we did. We got to the Final Four. Then I got hurt. NBA.com: You went down against Villanova, your tournament ended by a torn ligament. I’m surprised, looking back, you were considered healthy enough to get drafted No. 1 and have a pretty strong rookie season. BL: I wasn’t healthy when I got to the league. I shouldn’t have played my first year. But there was so much pressure from them to play, I would have been much better off -- and our team would have been much better served -- if I had just sat out that year and worked on my knee. NBA.com: From the Final Four to the start of the NBA season isn’t much time to rehab a knee injury. Then you played 82 games, averaging 15.6 points and 8.1 rebounds in 24.6 minutes. BL: That was stupid. My knee was so sore every single day that it was ludicrous to be doing what I was doing. I wanted to play, but I was smart and the team was smart, everybody would have benefited. NBA.com: Did you ever fully recover? I know your later years were hampered by knee pain. BL: Oh, I fully recovered. Going into my third year, I think I had my legs underneath me a lot. NBA.com: Your coach as a rookie was Butch van Breda Kolff, who had butted heads with Wilt Chamberlain in Los Angeles. Did you have any issues with him? BL: He was a pretty tough coach, but he was a good-hearted person. As a matter of fact, he had a place down on the Jersey shore where he invited me to come and run on the beach to help strengthen my leg. I went there for about 2 1/2 weeks. I liked Butch a lot. NBA.com: Your Detroit teams had you as an All-Star nearly every season and of course Hall of Fame guard Dave Bing. Did you think you’d achieve more? BL: I think ’73-74 was our best team [52-30]. We had Dave, Stu Lantz, John Mengelt, Chris Ford, Don Adams, Curtis Rowe, George Trapp. But then for some reason, they traded six guys off that team before the following year. I just didn’t feel we ever had the leadership. I think we had [seven] head coaches in my 10 years there. That was a rough time, because at the end of every year, you’d be so despondent. NBA.com: So by the time you were traded to Milwaukee, you were ready to go? BL: I wanted the trade. But until you start getting on that plane and leaving your family and start crying, you don’t realize it’s a part of your life you’re leaving. I got to Milwaukee and it was freezing outside. But the people gave me a standing ovation and really made me feel welcome. It was the start of a positive change. I just wish I had played with that kind of talent around me when I was young. The only time I thought I had it was that ’73-74 team they messed up. But if I had had Marques [Johnson] and Sidney [Moncrief] and all of them around me? Damn. NBA.com: I got my start around those Bucks teams, and feel I often have to remind people how good they were deep into the ‘80s. You just couldn’t get past the Celtics and the Sixers in the same year, in a loaded Eastern Conference. BL: They were always a man better than us. We had to play our best to beat them and they didn’t have to play their best to beat us. It haunts me to this day. NBA.com: How did you like playing for Bucks coach Don Nelson? BL: Loved him. It was just like playing for your big brother. He was a player’s coach, for sure. He’d been through it, won championships. Knew what it was like to be a role player, knew what it took to be a prime-time player. Didn’t get upset over pressure. He was just a stand-up guy. NBA.com: As we talk, I’m looking at my office wall and I have that famous All-Star poster from 1977, painted by Leroy Neiman. That game was notable, too, because it was the first one after the NBA/ABA merger. So you had Julius Erving, George Gervin, Dan Issel and those other ABA stars flooding their talent into the league. BL: You know what? I think you could put 10 players from the 70s into the league today and be as competitive as anybody. Think of the guys who could really play and were athletic. And with the rule changes, that would make us even more effective. “Ice’ [Gervin]. Julius. David Thompson, a huge athlete. I don’t know who could mess with Kareem at all. NBA.com: What about Nate Archibald? BL: You took the words right out of my mouth. Tiny! He could scoot up and down and do what he needed to do. These guys knew the game, they played the basics of it so well. NBA.com: No one disputes the advances in training, nutrition, travel and rest. But in raw ability, you think it was close to today? BL: One thing I will say about this group of young men, they seem to be more athletic than we were. They seem to be able to cover so much more ground. Whatever that new step is, the Eurostep? And another thing they do differently know is, they brush-pick. They brush and then they pop. You rarely see a guy do a solid pick and then roll with the guy on his back to cause a mismatch. Everybody’s looking to open the floor to shoot 3’s. This has become the weapon of choice now. NBA.com: No rings for that Milwaukee team from which you retired has meant, so far, no Hall of Fame for Marques Johnson or Sidney Moncrief, the two stars.   BL: That’s what rings hollow in your ears. You hear people saying, “Where’s the ring? The ring!” And we don’t have any rings. That’s what we play for. NBA.com: Didn’t stop your enshrinement though. BL: They must have been blind, crippled and crazy, huh? It’s a short crop of brotherhood that gets in there. I just wish there was more time on those weekends where we could spend time just talking with one another. You rarely see each other, and it would be nice to have a quiet room where you could just re-hash old times and plays, and maybe have your family so your grandkids could listen to Earl the Pearl tell about this or [Bill] Walton tell about that. Just rehashing stuff that brought people a lot of joy. Steve Aschburner has written about the NBA since 1980. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

Here s why Chris Webber should be in the Hall of Fame

By David Aldridge, TNT Analyst C-Webb needs to be in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame. My Turner colleague Chris Webber has always brought out polarizing opinions -- first as a player, and now as a broadcaster. And I’m not objective when it comes to him, either. I love the guy. He’s a true student of the game, not afraid to speak his mind on and off the court, and is someone whose love for the game knows no equal. It’s just a matter of time before he gets his chance to run a team, either in the front office or as a part-owner. But it will and should happen. And, after his impactful career as a player, he should be enshrined in Springfield. Everyone’s criteria for the Hall is different. To me, getting in the Hall as a player requires a yes answer to two questions: 1) were you among the very best at your position for a substantial period of time during your career, and 2) did your presence and/or play change the game in a meaningful way while you played? (This is why a guy like Sixers guard Andrew Toney, in my view, is HOF-worthy, even though “The Boston Strangler” played from 1980-88 and was limited significantly by injury in two of those seasons.) Webber is a “yes” to both of those questions. In the NBA, Webber was a five-time All-Star, four times with the Kings, and was Rookie of the Year in 1993. He was first- or second-team All NBA four times. His career PER of 20.9 is the highest of any non-retired and Hall of Fame eligible player that isn’t currently in the Hall. (Tim Duncan, Kobe Bryant and Kevin Garnett each have higher PERs than Webber, and each is an obvious HOF lock, but they aren’t Hall of Fame eligible until 2020.) Webber’s career PER is better than those of Hall of Famers including Allen Iverson, Bob McAdoo, Ed McCauley, George McGinnis, Billy Cunningham, Steve Nash, David Thompson, Connie Hawkins, Alex English, Walt Bellamy, Cliff Hagan and many others. Yet in his fifth year of eligibility, Webber was again passed over by the Hall of Fame voters this year. That needs to change. His impact on the game, from high school to being a member of the “Fab Five” at Michigan in college and during his 15 NBA seasons, is undeniable. The Hall encompasses all of a person’s basketball achievements, and Webber’s career is Hall-worthy. At Country Day High School in Michigan, he led his team to three state championships, averaging 29 points and 13 rebounds per game his senior season, when he was a consensus national player of the year. He then decided to cap an incredible recruiting class, which had three of the top 10 players in the country, among a group of freshmen that came to be known as “The Fab Five.” (Also on that Michigan team was a junior guard who averaged 2.9 points per game, who had no future as pro player, but who carved out a place for himself nonetheless in the NBA -- Rob Pelinka, who became a high-powered agent representing the likes of Kobe Bryant before becoming the Lakers’ General Manager in 2017.) “The Fab Five”, like it or not -- and, I liked it very much -- changed basketball forever. And Webber was the lynchpin of those Michigan teams that reached consecutive NCAA championship games in 1992 and ‘93. Across the board, the Fab Five had long-lasting impact. Aesthetically, they were vanguards, wearing long, loooong shorts that became all the rage throughout basketball.  And while trash talking has been at the heart of hoops for generations, Michigan raised it to a team-wide art form. It drove traditionalists crazy, while kids watching at home loved it. They were the accelerant to the “one-and-done” era, even though none of them left Michigan after their freshman season. But seeing five freshmen start games and play the lion’s share of minutes rippled throughout the college game. Going forward, teams didn’t just recruit blue-chippers, they put them on the floor immediately. What John Calipari does annually at Kentucky now is but the logical conclusion to what Michigan started, and every Power 5 team in college basketball has had to follow suit or get left behind. Of course, “The Fab Five” era wound up being star-crossed. I’m well aware of the penalties assessed to the Michigan program because of the money that Ed Martin gave to players, including Webber. The university vacated the ‘92-93 season, including all of its NCAA Tournament games that year, and took down the banners commemorating “The Fab Five” and their two Final Four runs. (Michigan also vacated all of its games from 1995-96 because of Martin’s associations with other players on teams during those seasons, and its ‘93, ‘96 and ‘98 NCAA Tournament appearances, as well as its ‘97 NIT title and ‘98 Big 10 Tournament championship.) It’s obvious to me that if not for his involvement with Martin, Webber would have been on the 2000 U.S. Olympic team, which won the gold medal in Australia, as well -- another potential feather in his cap that would bolster his Hall of Fame credentials. I will say, as delicately as I can, that there are coaches and players in the Hall that have been accused of doing some of the very things that got Michigan and Webber in so much trouble. That, in and of itself, should not be disqualifying. Webber’s NBA career also did not include a championship. But he was just as impactful on the pro game. Beginning in Golden State and Washington, C-Webb was a category all his own -- a big man with catcher’s mitts for hands who could pulverize in transition, yet was also an incredibly deft passer, both from the post or out front. As a rookie, Webber elevated Golden State from a 34-48 record in 1992-93 to 50-32 the next season. Traded to Washington after that one season with the Warriors, having conflicted mightily with Coach Don Nelson, Webber helped get the then-Bullets to the postseason for the first time in nine years. Once there, the Bullets went toe-to-toe with the defending-champion Bulls in a tough, three-game first-round series in ’97. But it wasn’t until Webber was sent to what was then the equivalent of Siberia in the NBA -- Sacramento -- that his game reached full flower. Playing with another excellent passing big man in Vlade Divac, and a flashy savant of a point guard in Jason Williams, Webber and the Kings were the vanguard of the modern NBA game, coming to fruition years before the Suns’ Seven Seconds or Less attack led by one of last week’s Hall of Fame inductees, Steve Nash. The Kings moved the ball with flair and purpose. The Warriors have changed the game forever by stretching the floor to the breaking point for opposing defenses with their 3-point proficiency, but even they didn’t have what Sacramento possessed -- two bigs who could initiate and finish from anywhere inside the 3-point line. No one could do what the Kings could do, and with Webber, Sacramento changed almost overnight from perennial joke to perennial championship contender. The Kings made the playoffs six straight seasons, reaching the Western Conference finals in 2002 before losing in controversial fashion to the Lakers in seven games. Webber’s knee injury during the Kings’ semifinal playoff series with Dallas in 2003 marked the beginning of the end for him and the Kings. If he hadn’t gotten hurt, Sacramento probably would have beaten the Mavericks and played San Antonio in the West finals. And while San Antonio would have been favored in that series, the Kings would have had a chance, with the winner facing the Nets in The Finals that year. And a championship would also have made C-Webb’s pro career look much different. But, that didn’t happen. It doesn’t matter, though. Webb’s career stands on its own merits. At all levels, he has had impact and changed the game, and he deserves to have his moment in the sun in Springfield. Sometimes it takes players of merit a little longer, for various reasons -- think Spencer Haywood, or, this year, Mo Cheeks. Chris Webber is a Hall of Famer, and it isn’t a close call. Longtime NBA reporter, columnist and Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Famer David Aldridge is an analyst for TNT. You can e-mail him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter. The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs or Turner Broadcasting......»»

Category: sportsSource:  abscbnRelated NewsSep 11th, 2018

UAAP 81 Preview: DLSU Green Archers still solid despite key losses

How do you call this – rebuilding? I’m not sure. This team should be even better if they still had the Rivero brothers and Paraiso, but that falling out owing to a variety of reasons has to tell on the chances of the DLSU Green Archers. .....»»

Category: sportsSource:  philstarRelated NewsSep 10th, 2018

Should employees pay the cost of “Dress Code” required at work?

Alexander Brown and Arik Silva worked as retail sales associates at Abercrombie & Fitch Co., a company that operates retail clothing stores throughout the United States. Brown and Silva sued their employer in a class action, claiming that the employer compelled them to patronize Abercrombie products in violation of California law.   The employees claim that their employer compelled them to purchase Abercrombie clothing for two reasons: First, Abercrombie wanted to make profits from those purchases. Second, Abercrombie saw it as a marketing strategy so that the employees would be walking advertisements for Abercrombie. The employees argue that Abercrombie's cloth...Keep on reading: Should employees pay the cost of “Dress Code” required at work?.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 7th, 2018

Time for Trumpy Filipinos to flip, and you can do it anonymously

I've followed the phenomenon of the Trumpy Filipino for nearly two years now, and despite all the reasons for flips to flip, each time I go back and ask if any of them would like to recant their support for The Donald, they stand pat. They mention reasons for sticking with Trump, like Hillary, as if that's relevant. Or they talk about the economy. Yeah, that's a good one. Taxes are lower. And what about conservative values about controlling the debt? Oh, but the economy is good, they say. So, forget about the president who is the subject of an active criminal investigation; an unindicted co-conspirator; the subject of a damning book by Watergate journalist Bob Woodward, who cal...Keep on reading: Time for Trumpy Filipinos to flip, and you can do it anonymously.....»»

Category: newsSource:  inquirerRelated NewsSep 7th, 2018